AFIO Weekly Intelligence Notes #07-19 dated 19 February 2019

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CONTENTS

Section I - INTELLIGENCE HIGHLIGHTS

Section II - CONTEXT & PRECEDENCE

Section III - COMMENTARY

Section IV - Research Request, Jobs, Obituaries

Research Request

Jobs

Obituaries

Section V - Events

Upcoming AFIO Events

Other Upcoming Events from Advertisers, Corporate Sponsors, and Others

For Additional AFIO and other Events two+ months or more... Calendar of Events 

WIN CREDITS FOR THIS ISSUE: The WIN editors thank the following special contributors: ec, po, mh, km, gh, mk, rd, fm, kc, jm, mr, jg, th, ed, and fwr. They have contributed one or more stories used in this issue.

The WIN editors attempt to include a wide range of articles and commentary in the Weekly Notes to inform and educate our readers. However, the views expressed in the articles are purely those of the authors, and in no way reflect support or endorsement from the WIN editors or the AFIO officers and staff. We welcome comments from the WIN readers on any and all articles and commentary.
CAVEATS: IMPORTANT: AFIO does not "vet" or endorse research inquiries, career announcements, or job offers. Reasonable-sounding inquiries and career offerings are published as a service to our members, and for researchers, educators, and subscribers. You are urged to exercise your usual caution and good judgment when responding, and should verify the source independently before supplying any resume, career data, or personal information.]
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Gifts appropriate for intelligence officers, colleagues, recruitments, agents, advisors, and family.

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The Humanity of Espionage - A Symposium
at The Catholic University of America

28 February 2019, 6 - 8pm - Washington, DC

All AFIO Members and guests are invited to attend at no cost.

The Intelligence Studies Program of The Catholic University of America and the Institute for Human Ecology are cosponsoring the symposium.

Espionage is the collection of national security intelligence through human means. One person, the spy–typically a foreign national with access to information–passes it to another person, called a handler or case officer. At the heart of this activity is the relationship between the spy and his handler. This panel of former CIA case officers will explore the nature of that relationship through exploration of a variety of questions:

What does it mean to persuade another human being to break the trust he has with his own country and work for the benefit of the United States?
What obligations does the U.S. government have in such situations?
What is the personal connection between spy and case officer–is it totally cynical, or is there an authentic relationship?
How do we mitigate the risk to human dignity in the conduct of this intelligence activity?

Join moderator Nicholas Dujmovic (assistant professor and director of the University's Intelligence Studies and 26-year veteran of CIA, having served as an analyst, manager, editor of the President's Daily Brief, and CIA staff historian) and the following panelists for a great discussion:

John Bennett is a former Director of the National Clandestine Service at CIA. He retired from CIA in 2013 after 33 years as an operations officer and manager. Mr. Bennett served 18 years overseas, mostly in Africa, including four tours as a Chief of Station. He engaged in Cold War programs directed against the Soviets in Africa and managed counter-terrorism operations in East Africa and Southwest Asia. Mr. Bennett has a Bachelors Degree from Harvard and a Masters Degree from Georgetown University. Prior to joining CIA he served for five years as an infantry officer in the United States Marine Corps.

Juan Cruz is a former career CIA operations and case officer. He served as chief of station in four different overseas locations and later was in charge of the Agency's Latin America division. He has experience in counterinsurgency, counterproliferation, covert action, and covert influence operations. Mr. Cruz graduated from Georgetown University's School of Foreign Service and has a master's degree from Johns Hopkins. He has done graduate work at the Pontificia Universidade Catolica of Rio de Janeiro. Most recently he served on the National Security Council as Special Adviser to the President and Senior Director for the Western Hemisphere. He is originally from Puerto Rico and speaks Spanish and Portuguese.

Gil Kindelan is a retired case officer with 34 years of government service in the US Army and the CIA. He served overseas for 17 years of his career in Asia, Eastern Europe during the Cold War, Western Europe and the Middle East as a case officer, deputy chief of station and chief of station. At CIA Headquarters, he served at various levels of management including chef of staff in the Counterterrorism Center. Since retiring he works part-time as a consultant. He has a masters degree in journalism and has worked as broadcast newsman and director of an educational TV news program.

Scotty Skotzko served 40 years as a CIA operations officer with eight overseas postings in the Balkans, South Asia and Africa, senior management positions in several Headquarters components, and deployments in support of U.S. military operations in Somalia, Kosovo, Iraq, Qatar and Afghanistan. His experience includes interagency intelligence collaboration, cooperation with foreign governments, and researching lessons-learned case studies of security issues. He is a graduate of Franklin and Marshall College and the Columbia University School of International Affairs.

Full details here. For questions or accommodations, please contact ihe@cua.edu.

Location: The Catholic University of America, Heritage Hall in Father O'Connell Hall, 620 Michigan Ave NE, Washington, DC 20064 + Google Map and Directions


NCMF 2019 Spring Cryptologic Program Featuring Mr. C. Eric Estberg on Berlin Daze

Wednesday, 27 March 2019, 10 am - 1 pm - Annapolis Junction, MD

The National Cryptologic Museum Foundation's 2019 Spring Cryptologic Program features C. Eric "Rick" Estberg, author of the book Berlin Daze. Following his presentation, a book signing and lunch will take place from 1145 to 1300. Books will be available for purchase for $20. Learn more about Mr. Estberg, his presentation, and his book below.

Berlin Daze recounts dozens of Estberg's adventures and unique experiences over a seven-year period in walled West Berlin, as an Army NCO and an NSA civilian. As a "Cold Warrior" he served literally on the front lines, separated by only a few miles from hundreds of thousands of Soviet and East German soldiers. Unlike others who spent much of a career in those days simply training for some possible future crisis, Rick actually lived his real-world mission, day-in and day-out, along with hundreds of others of talented, dedicated military and civilian intelligence specialists.

Registration: The registration fee includes lunch. It is $25 for members and guests. To register now online follow this link.

Or you may mail-in your registration fee by check to NCMF, PO Box 1682, Fort George G. Meade, MD 20755-9998. Include names of self and your guests. For more details, please call the NCMF office at 301-688-5436. ***Deadline for registration is 25 March 2019.*****

Event Location: CACI Inc., Maryland Conference Center, 2720 Technology Dr, Annapolis Junction, MD 20755. Google map link here.

More about this event, about the author or book, is here.

Additional information or questions can be handled at NCMF Office at cryptmf@aol.com or call 301-688-5436


New and Forthcoming Books of the Week

Practical Terrorism Prevention — Reexamining U.S. National Approaches to Addressing the Threat of Ideologically Motivated Violence
by Brian A. Jackson, Ashley L. Rhoades, Jordan R. Reimer, Natasha Lander, Katherine Costello, Sina Beaghley
(RAND Corp, Feb 2019)

The Homeland Security Operational Analysis Center (HSOAC), operated for DHS by the RAND Corporation, released a new report on how to build an effective and practical national approach to terrorism prevention. The report examines past terrorism prevention efforts and makes recommendations for future programs.
The report highlights various areas of terrorism prevention, including: • Successful community education efforts by DHS; • Countering terrorist narratives through public-private partnerships; • Robust systems inside government for suspicious-activity reporting, and the need for a uniform mechanism for making interventions for referral by the public; • How spending on terrorism prevention in the U.S. compares with some of our partners; • The role of state, local, nongovernmental and private organizations in leading prevention efforts, with support from the federal government; and, • The importance of addressing domestic as well as international terrorism in prevention programs. The full RAND Report is available here at no charge.

A printed version of the RAND Report may be ordered here.


Subordinating Intelligence: The DoD/CIA Post-Cold War Relationship
by David P. Oakley
(University Press of Kentucky, Feb 2019)

A first-time unique insight into an unseen history and evolution of the collaboration between two of the most critical national security agencies of the US government: the CIA and the DoD. Written not by an observer or reader, but by an intelligence professional who, in Iraq, experienced personally the complicated relationship between CIA and DoD, this book should be read by all serious national security students and professionals. — Douglas H. Wise, retired senior CIA operations officer and Deputy Director/DIA

This book is undoubtedly the most comprehensive treatment to date of the history of coordination and operational cooperation between the Department of Defense and the intelligence community of the United States, especially the Central Intelligence Agency. This is a thorough and balanced study of this issue, collecting in one work the key developments of recent years. — David Edger, senior fellow at the University of Oklahoma's Center for Intelligence and National Security and former CIA associate Deputy Director/DO

David Oakley has compiled a compelling and informative assessment of the history of the CIA and DoD during a critical time of US history. His attention to detail and rigorous exploitation of source material provide for a rich and unrivaled account that should be included on the reading lists of scholars and practitioners alike. Though historical in focus, the subject matter could not be more relevant for today's times. — David H. Ucko, author of The New Counterinsurgency Era: Transforming the US Military for Modern Wars

NOTE: 30% off at kentuckypress.com with code FS30. Access discount here.

Book may also be ordered here.


The Threat: How the FBI Protects America in the Age of Terror and Trump
by Andrew G. McCabe
(St. Martin's Press, Feb 2019)

On 16 March 2018, just twenty-six hours before his scheduled retirement from the FBI, McCabe was fired as deputy director of the FBI after being caught lying about his contacts and leaks to the press. He lied about it repeatedly, under oath. The FBI Office of Professional Responsibility agreed that he should be dismissed. The Department of Justice concurred. And President Donald Trump fired him and celebrated on Twitter: "Andrew McCabe FIRED, a great day for the hard working men and women of the FBI - A great day for Democracy."

This is McCabe's payback. It offers a different version of what happened and why. It is an account of his career, and a defense of other FBI agents, and of the institution's integrity and independence.

McCabe started as a street agent in the FBI's New York field office, serving under director Louis Freeh. He became an expert in two kinds of investigations that are critical to American national security: Russian organized crime—which is inextricably linked to the Russian state—and terrorism. Under Director Robert Mueller, McCabe led investigations of major attacks on American soil, including the Boston Marathon bombing, a plot to bomb the New York subways, and several narrowly averted bombings of aircraft. Under James Comey, McCabe was involved in the controversial investigations of the Benghazi attack, the Clinton Foundation's activities, and Hillary Clinton's use of a private email server and her dishonest accounts about that use when she was secretary of state.

McCabe recounts the period between Trump's November 2016 election and McCabe's firing. McCabe claims that the greatest threat to the US comes from (no surprise)...the man who fired him: Trump and his administration.

You decide.

Book may be ordered here.




Section I - INTELLIGENCE HIGHLIGHTS

Intelligence Community Migrates to Cloud Technology at Lightning Speed.  The U.S. Intelligence Community (IC) is moving at lightning speed to harness the advantages of migrating its networks to the cloud, enabling faster data consolidation, broader access to time-sensitive information and operationally significant network integration.

Working closely with Amazon Web Services, IC entities have been pursuing a multi-faceted, multi-year initiative to move its networks to the cloud, an effort which appears to have already massively transformed operations into a new, improved era.

Through its $600 million deal with Amazon going back to 2013, IC leaders are citing successes when it comes to a range of cloud-enabled developments, to include a much-increased ability to analyze legacy systems, integrate new ones and rework information networks, senior intelligence leaders describe. Amazon Web Services is credited with building the CIA's C2S cloud to gather, access and organize data.  [Read more:  Osborn/LexingtonInstitute/18February2019]

Senior Belgian Spy Accused of Sharing Secrets with Russia.  A senior Belgian intelligence officer is under investigation over allegedly sharing secrets with the Russians, in a case that exposes fears about spying in the European Union and Nato.

An unnamed major who is the head of division at the general intelligence and security service (GISS), the equivalent of M16, is accused of having exchanged confidential information with a Serbian woman believed to be a Russian agent.

In another blow to the agency, it emerged that Clement Vandenborre, the head of counter-intelligence at GISS, was suspended from his post at the end of last month. He is alleged to have shredded confidential documents, according to the Flemish daily De Morgen, which broke the story on Vandenborre and the Russian spying allegations.  [Read more:  Rankin/TheGuardian/15February2019]

'Secret Plan' to Create National Intelligence Agency in Swaziland.  There is a secret plan in Swaziland/eSwatini to set up a National Intelligence Agency, an  investigative website has reported.

The new body would report directly to King Mswati III, the kingdom's absolute monarch, the Swaziland News said.

The former National Commissioner of Police and present senator Isaac Magagula is said to be spearheading the move.

The new body would work closely with the police and correctional services in Swaziland which make up the kingdom's present civilian security services, the Swaziland News reported.  [Read more:  SwaziMedia/19February2019]

South Sudan Gets New Chief Of Military Intelligence.  South Sudan President Salva Kiir has appointed a new chief of military intelligence through an executive order.

Kiir replaced Major-General Chock-rach Angich with Major-General Rin Tueny Mabor, ending months of speculations over possible candidates for the position.

Tueny, former Eastern Lakes State governor has held various positions in the government.

The president gave no reason for the changes. [Madut/TowerPost/19February2019]

British MI6 Spy Chief to Stay to Guide Intelligence Post-Brexit.  The head of Britain's MI6 foreign spy service is expected to stay on beyond his retirement date this year to guide the intelligence agency through the post-Brexit period, The Times newspaper reported.

Alex Younger, 55, is due to retire in November after five years in the role. But officials want him to extend his appointment to cover the 12 to 24 months after Britain has left the EU, The Times said.

If Prime Minister Theresa May and Foreign Secretary Jeremy Hunt confirm the extension, he will become the longest-serving MI6 chief since the 1960s. MI6 chiefs, known as "C", traditionally serve for five years at most.  [Read more:  Reuters/13February2019]


Section II - CONTEXT & PRECEDENCE

Profile of a Traitor: How Monica Witt Proffered Herself to Iranian Intelligence.  There is no doubt the defection of former Technical Sergeant Monica Witt to Iran was an intelligence coup for Iran. How she got there and the gyrations which the Iranians went through to determine her bona fides shows they had their own counterintelligence concerns.

The Department of Justice indictment of Witt references Individual A, an unidentified female, as an individual with whom Witt was in contact both via email and face-to-face in 2012 through 2013. It is believed Individual A is American-born Iranian journalist, Marzieh Hashemi, the television news anchor for Iran's state-run Press TV.

In June 2012, following Witt's first visit to Iran, to a conference organized by Hashemi, the latter visited Witt in the U.S. and professionally engaged Witt in the production of a video in which Witt, a veteran of the U.S. armed forces, spoke ill of the United States.

Hashemi is characterized in the indictment as a "spotter and accessor" by the DOJ.  [Read more:  Burgess/ClearanceJobs/15February2019]

Letter From Bulgarian Intelligence Refutes Talk That 'Umbrella Murder' Victim Georgi Markov Was A Spy.  A Bulgarian historian has uncovered a document contradicting communist-era rumors that exiled dissident Georgi Markov worked as an agent abroad for Bulgarian foreign intelligence before his 1978 assassination.

Markov was a celebrated Bulgarian novelist and playwright who defected to become one of that country's most famous dissidents for his stinging criticism of communist society and its leaders.

He was poisoned in London in the infamous "umbrella murder," ascribed to an agent or operative of the Bulgarian communist regime's repressive secret police, the Committee for State Security (also known as State Security, or DS).

Rumors that Markov was a State Security agent or informer, or even a double agent, have persisted, fueled mostly by communist-era reports after his defection in 1969 and interviews and books about him by secret-service veterans.  [Read more:  RFERL/15February2019]

Can You Break Secret Code Set by Queen to Mark Intelligence Service's Centenary?  The Queen has revealed a new plaque to mark GCHQ's 100th birthday but you'd have to be a code breaker to figure out what it says.

The Monarch was on hand to unveil the green sign at Watergate House in Charing Cross yesterday.

The venue was the original home of the country's Intelligence, Security and Cyber Agency when it started in 1919.

People were left scratching their heads trying to figure out the code. [Read more:  Nsubuga/Metro/15February2019]

The Secret Life of Jack Bailey, Former Northeastern Dean and Military Intelligence Commander.  Jack Bailey was an exquisite dresser. This was what you noticed first. He would arrive for work each day at Northeastern's Boston campus like a character actor in an elegant Alfred Hitchcock film from the 1950s or �60s. A tailored suit with knife-sharp creases, a tie knotted-through like calligraphy, dark shoes shining bright: He wore his elegance casually.

John Stephen Bailey, who died on New Year's Eve in Athens, Greece, at age 89, was a former dean and public relations director at Northeastern. He expressed sophistication as if it had been bred into him. But there was more to him beyond his welcoming manner and fine fabrics. There was an urgency to the style he carried so easily.                                                            

Bailey's friends surmised this is why the United States Army placed him in charge of the secretive 421st military intelligence unit, which was based on Northeastern's campus in Boston in the 1960s.

Little is known of the seven-man Northeastern unit, or the work that Colonel Bailey performed as its commanding officer.  [Read more:  Thomsen/Northeastern/19February2019]

At a Glance: Intelligence Agencies of Bangladesh.  A number of domestic intelligence agencies, both state-owned and independent, operate in Bangladesh.

Despite some similarities among the intelligence agencies, each of these organizations has specific duties.

Giving details, Assistant Inspector General (Media) of Police headquarters Md Sohel Rana said:

"Each of the intelligence agencies operating under police jurisdiction carry out specific duties, and these units perform those duties as per orders."  [Read more:  Labu/DhakaTribune/19February2019]


Section III - COMMENTARY

That USAF RC-135 Rivet Joint Caribbean Spy Flight Was Far More Common Than Most Think.  For weeks now, Venezuela has been in the grips of a political battle between President Nicol�s Maduro and opposition leader Juan Guaido, who the United States and dozens of other countries have recognized as the country's legitimate head of state. The plane spotting community is now among those intently watching the situation for signs of curious air traffic, or a potential U.S. military intervention. So, it certainly turned heads when a U.S. Air Force RC-135V Rivet Joint spy plane made an unusually public appearance recently in the Caribbean Sea. But Rivet Joint missions in the region are more common than many people might know and this sortie may not necessarily have been related to the crisis in Venezuela at all.

Expert military aviation tracker and friend of The War Zone @aircraftspots was first to notice the RC-135V, serial number 63-9792, using the callsign Gismo 84, in the Caribbean on Feb. 14, 2019. The airliner-sized intelligence gathering platform subsequently linked up with a KC-10A Extender tanker, Spur 57. This isn't uncommon for Rivet Joint flights, which can be many hours long as the planes fly long tracks close to target areas gathering valuable intelligence.

Rivet Joints, which include the RC-135Vs, as well as the functionally equivalent RC-135Ws, are among the most capable aerial intelligence gathering platforms the Air Force has at present.  [Read more:  Trevithick/TheDrive/15February2019]

Project Raven: What Happens When U.S. Personnel Serve a Foreign Intelligence Agency?  It's been known since 2012 that a Baltimore-based company called Cyber Point had a contract with the United Arab Emirates (UAE) to assist its newly-established signals intelligence agency (then called the National Electronic Security Authority) with "advice on cyberdefense and policy," as Ellen Nakashima reported at the time for the Washington Post. Later, there were suggestions that Cyber Point might be involved in helping the UAE service acquire malware that the UAE used to support surveillance activities that included monitoring of political opponents. And now, Reuters has  a remarkable piece from Chris Bing and Joel Schactman, published last week, that goes deeper and raises important questions about the role of U.S. citizens in working for foreign intelligence agencies.

The Reuters report explains that Cyber Point hired a group of ex-NSA employees to work in the UAE in support of the UAE signals intelligence service, under the name of "Project Raven." Later, the Project Raven team was transferred in some fashion from the Cyber Point contract to a contract with the UAE-based firm DarkMatter. Along the way, the Americans came to appreciate that their efforts at times did indeed include surveillance of political opponents of UAE authorities, and further that the UAE service at times targeted Americans despite assurances that this would not occur (or at least that the operations Project Raven in particular conducted or supported would not be directed at Americans). They probably should not have been surprised by any of that. But be that as it may, the story understandably has excited concern that the United States lacks a sufficient policy-and-law framework to regulate situations of this kind.

What policy concerns, precisely, does this story illustrate?  [Read more:  Chesney/Lawfare/11February2019]

In Defense of Best Practices.  At the height of Operations Iraqi Freedom and Enduring Freedom, I worked as part of a contract team providing intelligence support to U.S. Central Command. Our team's job was to help document how exactly the U.S. Central Command Intelligence Directorate provided key intelligence support to operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. We examined how Central Command performed its functions - how data was received, integrated, analyzed, disseminated, and used from Tampa to Baghdad to Kabul.

To share these findings, my team created several documents that we titled the "USCENTCOM Intelligence Directorate Best Practices." Other commands looking to model Central Command's intelligence support processes read and shared these documents. Unfortunately, these other commands did not have teams of dedicated process analysts, so cross-command process comparisons were rare.

This level of understanding, documentation, and sharing of process should be encouraged across the entire intelligence community.  [Read more:  Lortz/WarOnTheRocks/13February2019]


Section IV - Research Request, Jobs, Obituaries

Research Request

CFP - The Australian Institute of Professional Intelligence Officers (AIPIO) issued a Call for Papers for the August 2019 conference. Paper proposal deadline is 15 April 2019.

On 19 - 21 August 2019 in Sydney, Australia, the Australian Institute of Professional Intelligence Officers (AIPIO) holds their National Conference. The AIPIO has issued a Call for Papers for this 2019 National Conference. The conference theme is "An Emerging Intelligence Enterprise" in Australia with a focus on capability planning, workforce/organizational development and analytic rigor. Proposals (300 word abstracts) are due by April 15, 2019 with a decision date of April 29, 2019. Papers will be due June 15, 2019 and with author approval will be published following the conference in a special issue of the AIPIO Journal.
CFP and conference details can be found here.

Jobs

FireEye Jobs Available are as follows:

Job Title:

Senior Data Scientist

Company:

FireEye, Inc.

Experience:

3 to 20 years

Salary:

Full Time

Job Location:

Reston, VA

 

Senior Data Scientist Reston, VA Full time Company Description FireEye is the intelligence led security company. Working as a seamless, scalable extension of customer security operations, FireEye offers a single platform that blends innovative security technologies, nation state grade threat intelligence, and world renowned...

 

Job Title:

Exploit/ Malware Researcher (UNIX and OSX)

Company:

FireEye, Inc.

Experience:

2 to 3 years

Salary:

Full Time

Job Location:

Reston, VA

 

Exploit/ Malware Researcher (UNIX and OSX) Reston, VA, USA Full time Company Description FireEye is the leader in intelligence led security as a service. Working as a seamless, scalable extension of customer security operations, FireEye offers a single platform that blends innovative security technologies, nation state grad...

 

Job Title:

Strategic Account Manager

Company:

FireEye, Inc.

Experience:

3 to 7 years

Salary:

Full Time

Job Location:

Reston, VA

 

Strategic Account Manager Reston, VA Full time Company Description FireEye is the leader in intelligence led security as a service. Working as a seamless, scalable extension of customer security operations, FireEye offers a single platform that blends innovative security technologies, nation state grade threat intelligence,...

Obituaries

David Forden, CIA Officer Involved in Major Soviet Recruitment, Dies at 88. 

David Warner Forden, 88, a Polish-speaking former Warsaw CIA station chief who ran a highly placed Polish colonel for eight years during Cold War, died 12 February 2019 of Alzheimer's disease in Alexandria, VA.
Forden's source - Ryszard Kuklinski, a colonel on the Polish Army's general staff and a liaison with Moscow - provided advance warnings that the Soviets were poised to invade Poland, as they had invaded Czechoslovakia in 1968, and may have helped prevent the invasion.
Forded, born in Buffalo, NY, was an Eagle Court, played football, read gas meters, delivered newspapers, and was passionate for skiing and tennis.
"Chip," as he was called, won a scholarship to Wesleyan University, earning a BA in Government in 1952. At the Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs at Syracuse University, he roomed with Peter Falk who went on to star as the rumpled television detective, Colombo. With an MA in public administration and a desire to serve the government, he traveled to Washington, DC in 1953 with Falk and other graduates in search of jobs. But under President Eisenhower's RIF, few agencies were hiring other than CIA. Forden was accepted on condition he complete Officer Candidate School at Fort Benning, GA. The training included six months of paratrooper training with the 82nd Airborne.
Forden's CIA career stretched from 1956 to 1988, spanning three decades of the Cold War. He served in Germany, Argentina, Poland, Mexico City, Vienna, and Greece, including as station chief in Warsaw, Vienna, and Athens. He rose to become Chief of the Soviet-Eastern European Division. Ahead of each foreign assignment, Forden mastered the language and immersed himself in the cultural, geographical, and political landscape of the new country. His love for Poland and its people held a special place in his life.
Field officers operating behind the Iron Curtain were forced to gather intelligence under heavy surveillance. In Warsaw in the mid-1960s, Forden perfected the use of a technique called the "brush pass" to exchange sensitive information with local sources. While out on a stroll, agents would quickly turn a corner and pass intelligence to a source in the brief moment before surveillance caught up, thus operating "in the gap." But Warsaw's streetscape was better-suited to driving than walking. Using the same concept, Forden developed a new technique he called the "moving car delivery."
Forden's knowledge of the Polish language, history and culture would prove invaluable years later when CIA gained one of its most productive sources of Soviet war plans: then Polish Lieutenant Colonel Ryszard Kuklinski. Recognizing the enormous risks that Kuklinski put himself and his family though in an effort to move Poland away from Soviet dominance, Forden cautiously built a trusting relationship with Kuklinski over the nine years of their operation.
In 1981 the Poles suspected a leak, so Forden helped Kuklinski and family escape to the U.S. and the two men developed a closer friendship that lasted their lifetimes.
Forden "was an improbable spy," Benjamin Weiser, a New York Times reporter, wrote in an outstanding book about the Kuklinski case, A Secret Life: The Polish Officer, His Covert Mission, and The Price He Paid to Save His Country (2004). "He often wondered how he had ended up working for the CIA."
Forden retired in 1988 after 35 years with CIA and was awarded its Distinguished Intelligence Medal.
Forden is survived by his three children, and other family.
A memorial service will be held in the spring with details to follow.  [Read more:  Roberts/NYTimes/13February2019]

Joe Hayes, Senior CIA Clandestine Services Officer

Joseph Patrick Hayes, 81, a senior CIA Clandestine Services Officer, died 10 February 2019 in Fairfax, VA.
Joe attended the University of Wisconsin as an undergraduate and attended graduate school at both Stanford (PhD program in Humanities) and Princeton (Woodrow Wilson School). After completing his studies at Princeton, he joined the staff of the Woodrow Wilson School before joining the CIA.
Over the course of his 35-year career, Joe served in seven foreign locations in Central and Eastern Europe and the Far East in positions ranging from classical espionage officer to senior field commander of complex global programs and as a Chief of Station. During his assignments to Washington, he served in a number of senior positions in the Soviet/Eastern European Affairs Division where he oversaw operations against the Soviet Union, was Chief for Policy, and the leader of a major joint CIA-NSA program significant in scope and impact. He was founding Director of the Center for the Study for Intelligence, and was selected by the Director to be the inaugural holder of the Richard Helms Chair where he was able to work with the next generation of Operations Officers to prepare them to conduct overseas operations.
Joe received numerous distinctions and awards during his CIA service including the Distinguished Career Intelligence Medal, the Medal of Merit, the Director's Award, was a two time recipient of the Donovan award and also received the National HUMINT Collector of the Year Award.
Joe loved this country and the promises of this country; he was a great patriot with an immense passion for the mission and an equally deep compassion for those who carry it out. He believed in the enduring idea of liberty and freedom, that Communism and the USSR were the clear and direct threat of his age and was gratified to have seen the fall of The Berlin Wall; a piece of which was a treasured possession.
Joe's principal interests in the Intelligence world included the relationship between technology and human intelligence; the challenge of fostering, nurturing and embracing creativity and innovation in high-security intelligence enterprises; and realizing the potential of multinational intelligence and security partnerships against problems of common concern.
After retiring, he joined Booz Allen Hamilton where he played a leadership role with the Collection Concepts Development Center created to develop new ideas for Intelligence collection at the direction of the Associate Director of Central Intelligence.
In his later years, he continued to work on a broad range of intelligence issues for CIA as a consultant.
Joe loved music, art, languages, poetry, and the stoic philosophy of Marcus Aurelius. His favorite musical piece was by Johann Sebastian Bach - partita for solo violin Number 2 in D minor and two poems he especially cherished were Alive Together by Lisel Mueller and Ithaca by C.P. Cavafy. He frequently cited T.S. Eliot, whose collective works were always close at at hand. As C.P. Cavafy began his poem Ithaca, "as you begin your journey, pray that it is a long one, filled with many adventures" and so it was.
From his first job working with steel at a factory in Patterson, NJ to living in places that he would never have imagined visiting as a child; where life began for him in very modest circumstances, he lived his life fully and completely. As gratifying as his professional life was, Joe's richest source of satisfaction and inspiration were the moments of human contact which filled his memory.
As a life long learner, who had recently become interested in quantum computing.
He is survived by his wife of over 55 years, Marbeth, two sons, and other family. A memorial service will be held in the spring at Quantico National Cemetery, 18424 Joplin Rd., Triangle, VA.. [Read more:  WashingtonPost/16February2019]

Remembering Sir Charles Farr 1959-2019.  The Institute mourns the loss of Sir Charles Farr, the Chairman of the Joint Intelligence Committee and Head of the Joint Intelligence Organisation in the Cabinet Office, who passed away on Friday, 15 February.

Sir Charles was not only a gifted and dedicated senior civil servant, but also exceptional in his determination to engage the broader expertise of the academic and think-tank community in the task of analysing and interpreting intelligence information. All those who had the privilege of working with him would attest to his determination and razor-sharp attention to detail, but also to his ability to take seriously counter-arguments to the prevailing views of the intelligence community. Sir Charles was acutely aware of the danger of 'group-think'.

Commenting on Sir Charles's death, Sir John Scarlett, RUSI's Vice-Chairman said: 'Charles Farr was a truly exceptional public servant. I know from long personal experience his deep commitment to the safety of our country and our citizens. We are fortunate indeed to have benefited from his high intelligence, practical abilities and consistent hard work. I do not use any of these words lightly. His premature passing is a great loss and tragedy.' [Read more:  RUSI/19February2019]


AFIO EDUCATIONAL EVENTS IN COMING TWO MONTHS....

Thursday, 14 March 2019, 11:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m. - Scottsdale, AZ - AFIO AZ Chapter hosts Dr Gary Marchant discussing "Artificial Intelligence - Current Applications and Concern."

Artificial intelligence (AI) has recently had a resurgence in attention and applications due to recent innovations in machine learning and deep learning. This presentation will describe the recent advances in AI and why they are important, and will describe some current applications of AI across various industry and social sectors. It will also describe some of the concerns about Ai in terms of potential bias, safety, technological unemployment, national security and international competiveness.
Professor Marchant's research interests include the use of genetic information in environmental regulation, risk and the precautionary principle, legal aspects of personalized medicine, and regulation of emerging technologies such as nanotechnology, neuroscience and biotechnology. He teaches courses in Environmental Law, Law, Science & Technology, Genetics and the Law, Biotechnology: Science, Law and Policy, and Nanotechnology Law & Policy. Professor Marchant has served on two National Research Council committees, has been the principal investigator on several major grants, and has organized numerous academic conferences on law and science issues.

TO ATTEND: RSVP no later than 72 hours ahead of time. And if you have to cancel or find you cannot attend, the chapter is charged for no-shows. A charge can be avoid if we receive word of your cancellation more than 72 hours before day of event.
BADGES: many have a permanent, regular badge. If you do not, email Simone at simone@afioaz.org with the information you would like on your badge (Full Name and Past Career Title/Affiliated Organization ~ should you wish). The cost with a magnetic strip is $8.
For reservations or questions, email Simone at either of these: simone@4smartphone.net, or simone@afioaz.org; or call and leave a message on 602.570.6016.
REMEMBER: If you are bringing a guest, send the full name.
Location: Best Western Thunderbird Suites, 7515 E Butherus Dr, Scottsdale, AZ 85260
Luncheon fee: $18 pp
RSVP - to simone@afioaz.org.

Thursday, 21 March 2019, 11:30 AM - Colorado Springs - The AFIO Rocky Mountain Chapter hosts Steve Maffeo, discussing "Intelligence in the Nelson Era."

In today's world of satellites and electronic eavesdropping, it's hard to appreciate the difficulties in collecting, analyzing, and disseminating secret intelligence two centuries ago. This presentation, based upon the speaker's first book Most Secret and Confidential: Intelligence in the Age of Nelson, gives a close look at the methods used to obtain and analyze secret material and deliver it to operational forces during the Great Age of Fighting Sail. The British experience from 1793 to 1815 is the main focus, but it also includes French and American activity. In addition, it examines how commanders used the information to develop strategy and tactics and win—or sometimes lose—battles. And, it informs on how Vice Admiral Lord Nelson and his associates dealt with intelligence obstacles and how the outcomes affected their own futures and, in some cases, the history of the modern world.

Steve Maffeo retired in 2008 as a Navy captain – after 30 years (both enlisted and commissioned) in the Colorado Army National Guard, the U.S. Navy, and the U.S. Naval Reserve. His last three assignments were as the commanding officer of reserve shore-based units supporting the Office of Naval Intelligence, the Joint Intelligence Center Pacific, and the National Defense Intelligence College. Steve then retired in 2015 as the Associate Library Director at the U.S. Air Force Academy. He holds a B.A. (English) from the University of Colorado; an M.A. (Library Science) from the University of Denver; and an M.S. (Strategic Intelligence) from the U.S. National Defense Intelligence College. His civilian career was for the most part as a library administrator. He's worked at Martin-Marietta Aerospace, the University of Northern Colorado; the U.S. Naval War College; and the Aurora (Colo.) Public Library.
Steve has published several journal and encyclopedia articles as well as four books: Most Secret and Confidential: Intelligence in the Age of Nelson; Seize, Burn, or Sink: The Thoughts and Words of Vice Admiral Lord Nelson; The Perfect Wreck: "Old Ironsides" and HMS Java—A Story of 1812; and U.S. Navy Codebreakers, Linguists, and Intelligence Officers against Japan: 1910-1941.

For more information and to reserve a seat, please contact Steve at steve13507@gmail.com.

Monday, 13 May 2019, 5:30 p.m. - New York, NY - AFIO NY Metro hosts Jeff McCausland, University Professor and CBS National Security Consultant

Dr. Jeff McCausland, a visiting professor of International Security Studies at Dickinson College (Carlisle, PA) serves as a national security consultant for CBS radio and television. He routinely does analysis for CBS on issues such as Iraq, European security, arms control, or related questions of national security policy. He is currently involved in a project for the National Nuclear Security Administration focused on nuclear weapons in South Asia and proliferation of weapons of mass destruction. Dr. McCausland is also the founder and CEO of Diamond6 Leadership and Strategy, LLC.

Location: Society of Illustrators, 128 E 63rd St (between Park and Lexington), New York, NY 10065.
Timing: Registration starts at 5:30 pm, Speaker presentation starts at 6 pm. Fee: $50/person. Payment at the door only. Cash or check. Full dinner, cash bar.
RSVP: Strongly recommended that you RSVP to ensure space at event. Call or Email Chapter President Jerry Goodwin at afiometro@gmail.com or 646-717-3776.

Monday 18 September 2018, 5:30 p.m. - New York, NY - AFIO NY Metro Chapter hosts Larry Loftis, on SOE Hero, Odette Sansom, in his book Code Name: Lise

Larry Loftis is the author of Code Name: Lise—The True Story of the Woman Who Became WWII's Most Highly Decorated Spy, the story of Odette Sansom (1912-1995), a Frenchwoman living in England, wife of an Englishman and mother of 3 daughters, who was recruited into Britain's Special Operations Executive (SOE) to conduct espionage in France during WW II with her commander, and yet-to-be second husband, Peter Churchill. Leaving her daughters in a convent school and with relatives, she joined the rigorous training program, becoming proficient with a wide range of weapons, learning the fine points of spycraft, and perfecting her new identity with the code name Lise. In France she proved herself fearless. Hunted by the Germans, in 1943, Odette and Peter were captured, imprisoned, and tortured. Loftis describes Odette's ordeal in grisly detail. Two lies saved her: She pretended that she and Peter were married (they would be after the war) and that Peter was related to Winston Churchill. In defeat, the Gestapo hoped to use her as a bargaining chip.

Location: Society of Illustrators, 128 E 63rd St (between Park and Lexington), New York, NY 10065.
Timing: Registration starts at 5:30 pm, Speaker presentation starts at 6 pm. Fee: $50/person. Payment at the door only. Cash or check. Full dinner, cash bar.
RSVP: Strongly recommended that you RSVP to ensure space at event. Call or Email Chapter President Jerry Goodwin at afiometro@gmail.com or 646-717-3776.



Other Upcoming Events from Advertisers, Corporate Sponsors, and Others

Monday, 25 February 2019, 9 a.m. - 3:20 p.m. - Washington, DC - Journal of National Security Law & Policy Annual Symposium ― The Continuing Threat of Nuclear Weapons

This year's Journal of National Security Law & Policy symposium is "The Continuing Threat of Nuclear Weapons," and is brought to you by the JNSLP, the Georgetown Center on National Security and the Law, and the Georgetown Center for Asian Law. The symposium will be held on the 12th floor of the Gewirz Student Center. Directions and map here.

In addition to the following three panels, the symposium will also feature a lunchtime keynote speech by Joseph Cirincione, President of Ploughshares Fund. INTRODUCTORY REMARKS by Stephen Dycus, Professor of Law, Vermont Law School.
PANEL 1: Banning Nuclear Weapons?
Panelists: Adam Mount, Senior Fellow and Director of the Defense Posture Project, Federation of American Scientists; John Burroughs, Executive Director, Lawyers Committee on Nuclear Policy; Alexandra Bell, Senior Policy Director, Center for Arms Control & Non-Proliferation; Moderator: David A. Koplow, Professor of Law at Georgetown Law.

PANEL 2: U.S./Russia Nuclear Relations.
Panelists: Michael Krepon, Co-founder/Senior Associate, Stimson Center; Bonnie Jenkins, Nonresident Senior Fellow, Brookings Institute; Adam Scheinman, Former Special Representative of the President for Nuclear Nonproliferation, Dept. of State; Moderator: Dakota Rudesill, Assistant Professor of Law, Ohio State University Moritz College of Law.

LUNCHEON AND KEYNOTE ADDRESS by Joseph Cirincione, President of Ploughshares Fund.
PANEL 3: Nuclear Weapons Issues on the Korean Peninsula.
Panelists: Scott Snyder, Senior Fellow for Korea Studies and Director of the Program on U.S.-Korea Policy, Council on Foreign Relations; Joel S. Wit, Senior Fellow and Director of 38 North, Stimson Center; Sue Mi Terry, Senior Fellow, Korea Chair, Center for Strategic and International Studies; Moderator: James V. Feinerman, Co-Director, Georgetown Center for Asian Law.

CLOSING REMARKS: Stephen Dycus, Professor of Law, Vermont Law School
RECEPTION will follow the event.

To RSVP, please click here.

Qs?: Email Journal of National Security Law and Policy here.

28 February 2019, 6 - 8pm - Washington, DC - "THE HUMANITY OF ESPIONAGE" is the theme of this symposium at The Catholic University of America

All AFIO Members and guests are invited to attend at no cost.

The Intelligence Studies Program of The Catholic University of America and the Institute for Human Ecology are cosponsoring a symposium entitled "The Humanity of Espionage."

Espionage is the collection of national security intelligence through human means. One person, the spy�typically a foreign national with access to information�passes it to another person, called a handler or case officer. At the heart of this activity is the relationship between the spy and his handler. This panel of former CIA case officers will explore the nature of that relationship through exploration of a variety of questions:

What does it mean to persuade another human being to break the trust he has with his own country and work for the benefit of the United States?
What obligations does the U.S. government have in such situations?
What is the personal connection between spy and case officer�is it totally cynical, or is there an authentic relationship?
How do we mitigate the risk to human dignity in the conduct of this intelligence activity?

Join moderator Nicholas Dujmovic (assistant professor and director of the University's Intelligence Studies and 26-year veteran of CIA, having served as an analyst, manager, editor of the President's Daily Brief, and CIA staff historian) and the following panelists for a great discussion:

John Bennett is a former Director of the National Clandestine Service at the Central Intelligence Agency. He retired from CIA in 2013 after 33 years as an operations officer and manager. Mr. Bennett served 18 years overseas, mostly in Africa, including four tours as a Chief of Station. He engaged in Cold War programs directed against the Soviets in Africa and managed counter-terrorism operations in East Africa and Southwest Asia. Mr. Bennett has a Bachelors Degree from Harvard and a Masters Degree from Georgetown University. Prior to joining CIA he served for five years as an infantry officer in the United States Marine Corps.

Juan Cruz is a former career CIA operations and case officer. He served as chief of station in four different overseas locations and later was in charge of the Agency's Latin America division. He has experience in counterinsurgency, counterproliferation, covert action, and covert influence operations. Mr. Cruz graduated from Georgetown University's School of Foreign Service and has a master's degree from Johns Hopkins. He has done graduate work at the Pontificia Universidade Catolica of Rio de Janeiro. Most recently he served on the National Security Council as Special Adviser to the President and Senior Director for the Western Hemisphere. He is originally from Puerto Rico and speaks Spanish and Portuguese.

Gil Kindelan is a retired case officer with 34 years of government service in the US Army and the CIA. He served overseas for 17 years of his career in Asia, Eastern Europe during the Cold War, Western Europe and the Middle East as a case officer, deputy chief of station and chief of station. At CIA Headquarters, he served at various levels of management including chef of staff in the Counterterrorism Center. Since retiring he works part-time as a consultant. He has a masters degree in journalism and has worked as broadcast newsman and director of an educational TV news program.

Scotty Skotzko served 40 years as a CIA operations officer with eight overseas postings in the Balkans, South Asia and Africa, senior management positions in several Headquarters components, and deployments in support of U.S. military operations in Somalia, Kosovo, Iraq, Qatar and Afghanistan. His experience includes interagency intelligence collaboration, cooperation with foreign governments, and researching lessons-learned case studies of security issues. He is a graduate of Franklin and Marshall College and the Columbia University School of International Affairs.

Full details here. For questions or accommodations, please contact ihe@cua.edu.

Location: The Catholic University of America, Heritage Hall in Father O'Connell Hall, 620 Michigan Ave NE, Washington, DC 20064 + Google Map and Directions

Wednesday, 6 March 2019, 7:30 - 8:45 pm - McLean, VA - "How to Identify Jihadi-Salafists Through Ideology, Practices, and Methodology" - presentation by Dr Habeck at the Westminster Institute

Dr. Mary Habeck, Senior Fellow, FPRI, lectures on al-Qaeda and ISIS, as well as on military strategy and history, at the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies, Georgetown University, and American University.

Her recent monograph for the Heritage Foundation is titled The U.S. Must Identify Jihadi-Salafists through Their Ideology, Practices, and Methodology-and Isolate Them. She is the author of Knowing the Enemy: Jihadist Ideology and the War on Terror (Yale, 2005) and three forthcoming sequels, Attacking America: Al-Qa'ida's Grand Strategy; Managing Savagery: Al-Qa'ida's Military and Political Strategies; and Fighting the Enemy: The U.S. and its War against al-Qa'ida.

She is also a Senior Fellow with the Foreign Policy Research Institute. From 2005-2013 she was an Associate Professor in Strategic Studies at SAIS, teaching courses on extremism, military history, and strategic thought. Before moving to SAIS, Dr. Habeck taught American and European military history in Yale's history department, 1994-2005. She received her PhD in history from Yale in 1996, an MA in international relations from Yale in 1989, and a BA in international studies, Russian, and Spanish from Ohio State in 1987.
Dr. Habeck was appointed by President Bush to the Council on the Humanities at the National Endowment for the Humanities (2006-2013), and in 2008-2009 she was the Special Advisor for Strategic Planning on the National Security Council staff.

Times: Come early to enjoy reception at 7 p.m. Program begins at 7:30 p.m.
Where: Westminster Institute, 6729 Curran St, McLean, VA 22101
Questions: Robert R. Reilly, Director, The Westminster Institute, Call 703-288-2885 or email him at br@westminster-institute.org
No fee to attend. RSVP here.

18 March 2019, noon - 2 pm - Washington, DC - "Talking to a Former Terrorist: American Al-Qaeda Bryant Neal Viñas" at the International Spy Museum

Bryant Neal Viñas, 'American Al-Qaeda' tells his story at the new, expanded International Spy Museum at their new location in L'Enfant Plaza.

In 2009, Bryant Neal Vi�as, an American born in New York to a family of Catholic Hispanic immigrants, pleaded guilty on charges of conspiracy to murder U.S. citizens, and for providing material support to Al-Qaeda. The media referred to him as 'American Al-Qaeda' and reported his intriguing journey from the New York suburbs to Pakistan to attack U.S. military forces in Afghanistan. Vi�as proceeded to cooperate with law enforcement and intelligence officials, in what has been described as a "treasure trove" of valuable information about the inner-workings of the Al-Qaeda network. What was the nature of Vi�as's radicalization? How does a Western-born jihadist get through terrorist training in Pakistan?

Participants: Bryant Neal Vi�as, Former American Al-Qaeda member; Mitchell Silber, Former Director of Intelligence Analysis, NYPD; Christopher Costa, COL, USA (Ret.), Executive Director, International Spy Museum, Former Special Assistant to the President and Senior Director for Counter-terrorism � National Moderator: Peter Bergen, Vice President, Global Studies & Fellows, New America

Event Location: The "Expanded" International Spy Museum, 700 L'Enfant Plaza SW, Washington, DC 20024. Directions or Map Location here.

Register Here.

Wednesday, 27 March 2019, 10 am - 1 pm - Annapolis Junction, MD - NCMF 2019 Spring Cryptologic Program Featuring Mr. C. Eric Estberg on Berlin Daze

The National Cryptologic Museum Foundation's 2019 Spring Cryptologic Program features C. Eric "Rick" Estberg, author of the book Berlin Daze. Following his presentation, a book signing and lunch will take place from 1145 to 1300. Books will be available for purchase for $20. Learn more about Mr. Estberg, his presentation, and his book below.

Berlin Daze recounts dozens of Estberg's adventures and unique experiences over a seven-year period in walled West Berlin, as an Army NCO and an NSA civilian. As a "Cold Warrior" he served literally on the front lines, separated by only a few miles from hundreds of thousands of Soviet and East German soldiers. Unlike others who spent much of a career in those days simply training for some possible future crisis, Rick actually lived his real-world mission, day-in and day-out, along with hundreds of others of talented, dedicated military and civilian intelligence specialists.

Registration: The registration fee includes lunch. It is $25 for members and guests. To register now online follow this link.

Or you may mail-in your registration fee by check to NCMF, PO Box 1682, Fort George G. Meade, MD 20755-9998. Include names of self and your guests. For more details, please call the NCMF office at 301-688-5436. ***Deadline for registration is 25 March 2019.*****

Event Location: CACI Inc., Maryland Conference Center, 2720 Technology Dr, Annapolis Junction, MD 20755. Google map link here.

More about this event, about the author or book, is here.

Additional information or questions can be handled at NCMF Office at cryptmf@aol.com or call 301-688-5436.

16 May 2019, 6 pm - Washington, DC - "Night of Heroes Gala 2019" by the PENFED Foundation

The PENFED Foundation hosts their impressive annual "Night of Heroes Gala 2019" at the beautiful Mandarin Oriental, 330 Maryland Ave SW, Washington, DC 20024. This year marks the 15th annual gala honoring our unsung heroes ― military children. Each year, the PenFed Foundation raises more than $1.5 million for military heroes through this hallmark event. Last year's event sold out and raised $2.5 million! Do not miss your opportunity to support Military Heroes.

6 pm General Reception and Silent Auction; 7 pm Dinner Program; After Dinner - Dessert Reception. To learn more...or to register.


Gift Suggestions:

AFIO's Guide to the Study of IntelligenceAFIO's 788-page Guide to the Study of Intelligence. Peter C. Oleson, Editor, also makes a good gift. View authors and table of contents here.

Perfect for professors, students, those considering careers in intelligence, and current/former officers seeking to see what changes are taking place across a wide spectrum of intelligence disciplines. AFIO's Guide to the Study of Intelligence helps instructors teach about the large variety of subjects that make up the field of intelligence. This includes secondary school teachers of American History, Civics, or current events and undergraduate and graduate professors of History, Political Science, International Relations, Security Studies, and related topics, especially those with no or limited professional experience in the field. Even those who are former practitioners are likely to have only a limited knowledge of the very broad field of intelligence, as most spend their careers in one or two agencies at most and may have focused only on collection or analysis of intelligence or support to those activities.
For a printed, bound copy, it is $95 which includes Fedex shipping to a CONUS (US-based) address.
To order for shipment to a US-based CONUS address, use this online form,

To order multiple copies or for purchases going to AK, HI, other US territories, or other countries call our office at 703-790-0320 or send email to afio@afio.com to hear of shipment fees.

Order the Guide from the AFIO's store at this link.

The Guide is also available directly from Amazon at this link.

MousepadAFIO's Intelligence Community Mousepads are a great looking addition to your desk...or as a gift for others.
Made in USA. Click image for larger view.

These 2017 mousepads have full color seals of all 18 members of the US Intelligence Community on this 8" round, slick surface, nonskid, rubber-backed mouse pad with a darker navy background, brighter, updated seals. Also used, by some, as swanky coasters. Price still only $20.00 for 2 pads [includes shipping to US address. Foreign shipments - we will contact you with quote.] Order MOUSEPADS here.

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