WIN #47-04 dtd 20 December 2004

Weekly Intelligence Notes (WINs) are commentaries on Intelligence and related national security matters, based on open media sources, selected, interpreted, edited and produced by AFIO for non-profit educational uses by AFIO members and WIN subscribers. IF YOU DO NOT WISH TO RECEIVE THESE NOTICES....SEE REMOVAL INSTRUCTIONS AT BOTTOM

CONTENTS of this WIN [HTML version recipients - Click title to jump to story or section, Click Article Title to return to Contents] [This feature does not work for Plaintext Edition recipients. If you wish to change to HTML format, let us know at afio@afio.com. However, due to recent changes in AOL's security standards, members using AOL will not be able to receive HTML formatted WINs from AFIO and will thus be receiving our Plaintext Edition. The HTML feature also does not work for those who access their e-mail using web mail. NON-HTML recipients may view HTML edition at this link: https://www.afio.com/pages/currentwin.htm

SECTION I -- CURRENT INTELLIGENCE

   Intel Warns Counterinsurgency in Iraq Not Winning

   DoD to Enlarge Intel Activities

SECTION II -- CONTEXT AND PRECEDENCE

   Bush Seeks DNI and 3 Top NIA Aides

   Muslim Chaplain's Prosecution Based on Unsound Evidence

SECTION III -- CYBER INTELLIGENCE

   Indonesian Islamist Urges Carding Against Americans

   GPS to be Shut Down During National Crises

   UK Police, Northrup to Upgrade Biometric ID Tech

SECTION IV -- BOOKS, SOURCES, AND ISSUES

   Books

      The 4th Global War and How It’s Going

      How to Protect Privacy

      Medieval Mystery Manuscript

   Issues

      Call for UAVs to Replace New Stealth Satellite Program

      CIA Barred Officers from Special Ops Interrogations

SECTION V -- CAREERS, NOTES, LETTERS, QUERIES, CORRECTIONS, COMING EVENTS, OBITUARIES

   Careers

      Translation Service Seeks Those with Bilingual Skills

   Notes

      Goss Picks Republican Flack to Head Public Affairs

   Correction

      Intel Budget Not Declassified

   Obituaries

      Norman K. Kriebel Jr.

      John H. Wyman

   Coming Events

      10 January 05 - Washington, DC - Spies on Screen: Behind the Scenes of BBC Video’s MI-5 - International Spy Museum

      FRIDAY, 14 January 05 - Tyson's Corner, VA - A F I O   W I N T E R   L U N C H E O N

      15 January 05 - AFIO Maine Chapter Organizational Meeting

      1 February & 8 February 05 - Washington, DC - Inside Stories: America Held Hostage - 444 Days to Freedom (2 Part Series) - International Spy Museum

      8 - 10 February - Crystal City, VA - New Intel Conference Debuts

     19 February 05 - Kennebunk, ME - AFIO Maine Chapter Meeting on Coast Guard Protection under Homeland Security

      24 February 05 - Washington, DC - Spies of the Kaiser - Lunchtime Author Debriefing and Book Signing - International Spy Museum

      1 March & 15 March 05 - Washington, DC - Sisterhood of Spies: Shady Ladies in Espionage (2 Part Series) - International Spy Museum

      10 March 05 - Washington, DC - Spy Book: The Encyclopedia of Espionage - International Spy Museum

     19 March 05 - Kennebunk, ME - AFIO Maine Chapter Meeting - Sen. Susan Collins(invited) on National Intelligence Reorganization Act

      21 - 22 March 05 - Washington, D.C. - EMININT 2005

      23 - 24 March 05 - Fairfax, VA - NMIA National Intelligence Symposium

      6 - 9 April 05 - Chicago, IL - SCIP Annual Conference

     15 - 16 April 05 - Saratoga Springs, NY - Cryptologic Veterans Reunion

      16 April 05 - Kennebunk, ME - AFIO Maine Explores Mysterious Death of Leslie Howard

      18 - 21 April 05 - SFSAFBI Western Regional Conference

      20 - 21 April 05 - Langley, VA - AFCEA Spring Intelligence Symposium

      21 April 05 - Washington, DC - 2005 MOAA Career Fair - DC Convention Center

      22 - 24 April 05 - Grapevine, TX - SFSAFBI South Central Regional Meeting

      25 - 28 April 05 - Philadelphia, PA - 2005 DoDIIS Worldwide Conference

      27 - 30 October 2005 - AFIO 30th Anniversary Symposium Celebration - Sheraton Premiere Hotel, McLean, Tyson's Corner, VA

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SECTION I -- CURRENT INTELLIGENCE

INTEL WARNS COUNTERINSURGENCY IN IRAQ NOT WINNING - The CIA, DIA and State Department have warned President Bush that the United States and its Iraqi allies are not winning the battle against insurgents, Knight Ridder newspapers reported on 17 December.

   (http://www.kansascity.com/mld/kansascity/news/politics/10443253.htm)

   Administration officials, speaking on condition of anonymity because intelligence estimates are classified, said the battle in Iraq was not lost and successful elections might yet be held on 30 January. But they said the warnings, including one delivered last week by DCI Goss, indicate that U.S. forces have not stopped intimidation of Iraqi voters and candidates.  A senior official said, "We don't have an answer to the intimidation."

   The United States and the interim Iraqi government have also failed to find divisions among the Sunni Muslim insurgents to exploit, the intelligence reports say. (DKR)

DoD TO ENLARGE INTEL ACTIVITIES - The Pentagon plans to give the military a more prominent role in intelligence-collection operations traditionally the province of the CIA, including missions aimed at terrorist groups and weapons proliferation, the New York Times reported on 19 December.

   (http://www.nytimes.com/2004/12/19/politics/19military.html?oref=login&th)

   Indications of the scope and significance of the secret plan began to emerge in recent weeks. DoD Deputy Undersecretary Lt. Gen. William G. Boykin heads a team that is drafting part of the overall proposal.

   Part of the proposal described by DoD officials is creation of a Joint Intelligence Operational Command within the Pentagon that would elevate the power of intelligence and possibly replace the DIA. Other ideas mentioned by DoD officials include “fighting for intelligence,” that is combat operations intended chiefly to obtain intelligence.  Also proposed is a major expansion of HUMINT within both uniformed services and the DIA.

   The White House and CIA are monitoring the DoD planning which has not yet received White House approval, according to administration officials. It is unclear to what extent U.S. military forces have already acquired increased authority for gathering intel.

   Boykin's proposal would ensure that senior officers work more closely with intelligence analysts tracking threats like terrorists and insurgency cells. A recent directive by DefSec Rumsfeld instructed regional commanders to expand the military's role in intelligence gathering, particularly in tracking terrorist and insurgent leaders.

   One former intelligence criticized putting more military resources into intel collection when the military is already stretched thin coping with insurgency in Iraq and handling threats elsewhere. But an intelligence official outside DoD said relations between the Pentagon and CIA were closer than ever. "There's a real sense that there's plenty of work for everyone," he said. (DKR)

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SECTION II -- CONTEXT AND PRECEDENCE

   BUSH SEEKS DNI AND 3 TOP NIA AIDES - President Bush is searching not only for a Director of National Intelligence but also for three other senior officials to fill top slots in the organization created by the Intelligence Reform Act, the Washington Post reported on 16 December.

   (http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A3146-2004Dec15.html)

   Bush signed the act into law on 17 December.

   (http://www.washingtontimes.com/national/20041217-114549-4735r.htm)

   Along with a DNI, there is to be a principal deputy DNI, a director of the national counterterrorism center, and a general counsel to the DNI. All will be presidential appointees subject to Senate confirmation.

   A chief information officer for the DNI, who is to create a computerized information-sharing system for the IC, will also be a presidential appointee confirmed by the Senate.

   Bush is also to name, and the Senate to confirm, a chairman and vice- chairman of the Privacy and Civil Liberties Board. The board will review regulations and policies related to the war on terrorism. They, too, are subject to a Senate vote.

   Whoever the President chooses for DNI will have to undergo Senate confirmation. That includes DCI Goss, should he be named to the new post although he now appears out of the running, according to the Post. (DKR)

MUSLIM CHAPLAIN’S PROSECUTION BASED ON UNSOUND EVIDENCE - Confidential government documents, court files and interviews show that investigations into a Muslim chaplain at Guantanamo drew significantly on questionable evidence and information that only tenuously linked him to Islamist militants, the New York Times reported on 19 December.

   (http://www.nytimes.com/2004/12/19/politics/19gitmo.html?pagewanted=all)

   The FBI found that a car belonging to the chaplain, Capt. James J. Yee, had been seen twice outside an Islamist activist's house in the Seattle area. Although it was unclear what the activist had done or whether Yee knew him, a counterintelligence officer, Captain Theodore C. Polet, took the FBI report to the Guantanamo commander, Maj. Gen. Geoffrey D. Miller.

   The case grew much bigger than has been made public, according to the Times, and developed into a web of counterintelligence investigations that eventually involved more than a dozen suspects, military and civilian agencies and numerous agents in the United States and overseas.

   In less than a year, the investigations into espionage and aiding the enemy turned into an embarrassment for DoD as legal cases against Yee and Airman Ahmad Al Halabi, a translator at Guantanamo, fell apart.

   Military officials have defended their actions and have pointed out that some of the inquiries continue.

   Air Force prosecutors could not make most of the charges stick against Halabi, who faced the death penalty. He pleaded guilty in September to four relatively minor charges of mishandling classified documents, taking two forbidden photographs of a guard tower and lying to investigators about the snapshots. He was sentenced to the 10 months imprisonment he had already served, and is appealing a bad-conduct discharge.

   Yee, a West Point graduate, was held in solitary confinement for 76 days, charged with six criminal counts of mishandling classified information and was suspected of leading a ring of subversive Muslim servicemen. He was found guilty only of non-criminal charges of adultery and downloading Internet pornography. That conviction was set aside in April, and his punishment was waived. (DKR)

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SECTION III -- CYBER INTELLIGENCE

INDONESIAN ISLAMIST URGES CARDING AGAINST AMERICANS - An Indonesian Islamist terrorist, Imam Samudra, has included a chapter in his recently published autobiography urging Muslim radicals to attack U.S. computers with the aim of committing credit card theft and outlining how to learn to do so, the Washington Post reported on 14 December.

   (http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A62095-2004Dec13.html)

   Samudra has been sentenced to death for his part in the bombing of a Bali nightclub in 2002 that killed 202 people, most of them Australian tourists.

   U.S. and Indonesian cybercrime experts called Samudra's primer on carding rudimentary but an indication of the growing threat posed by terrorists using Internet fraud to finance their operations.

   The book has had a first run of 4,000 copies in Indonesian. Samudra's attorney, Achmad Michdan, who wrote the forward, said the publisher is planning a second run and is considering translating the book into English, French and Arabic. Profits benefit Samudra's wife and children.

   The chapter on carding is less about "how to" than "how to learn," directing the reader to Indonesian-language Web sites that provide instruction. For those who find the sites too sophisticated, Samudra suggests first learning programming languages such as Linux. He also counsels learning about hacking by finding mentors through online chats and lists six chat rooms as sources. Samudra then discusses scanning for Web sites vulnerable to hacking and the basics of online credit card fraud and money laundering.

   "If you succeed at hacking and get into carding, be ready to make more money within three to six hours than the income of a policeman in six months," Samudra wrote. "But don't do it just for the sake of money. Remember, the main duty of Muslims is jihad in the name of God, to raise arms against the infidels, especially now the United States and its allies." (DKR)

GPS TO BE SHUT DOWN DURING NATIONAL CRISES - President Bush has ordered plans for temporarily disabling the U.S. network of global positioning satellites during a national crisis to prevent terrorists from using the navigational technology, AP reported on 15 December.

   A White House announcement said any shutdown would be ordered only in the most remarkable circumstances. The GPS system is vital to commercial aviation and marine shipping.

   Bush also ordered DoD to plan to be able to disable an enemy's access to the U.S. navigational satellites and to similar systems operated by others. The European Union is developing Galileo, a $4.8 billion undertaking. (DKR)

UK POLICE, NORTHRUP TO UPGRADE BIOMETRIC ID TECH - Britain's Police IT Organization and Northrop Grumman have made a deal worth $237.3 million, running for eight years, to create next-generation biometric identification technology, ZDNet reported on 15 December.

   Northrop Grumman is to provide the underlying technology for the Ident1 service, which is to allow police to identify suspects from palm prints and fingerprints throughout Britain.

   Ident1 will also be used for future undertaking in mobile fingerprint checking, facial imaging and video identification. (DKR)

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SECTION IV -- BOOKS, SOURCES, AND ISSUES

Books

   THE 4TH GLOBAL WAR AND HOW IT’S GOING - George Friedman, America’s Secret

War: Inside the Hidden Worldwide Struggle Between America and Its Enemies (Doubleday, 368pp. $25.95)

   Friedman, who will be a speaker at AFIO’s 14 January lunch, is founder and chairman of Strategic Forecasting, known as Stratfor, the highly successful Austin-based intelligence analysis firm.

   For Friedman, 9/11 and what has followed is the fourth global war. As Stratfor makes its money in large part from a corporate clientele, it aims at providing sound analysis to enable corporations to turn profits and avoid losses. The result, as this book shows, is a refreshing absence of spin that is so much a part of official views as publicly stated.

   Among the issues Friedman takes up are a deal the United States made with Russia and Iran which made possible the invasion of Afghanistan, why the Saudis closest friends in the administration became their worst enemies after 9/11, the CIA miscalculation of Saddam Husayn’s and Iran’s plans and also the strategic successes that are slowly leading the United States to victory.

   Sometimes Friedman may fail to convince, but more often he is informative and persuasive. (DKR)

   HOW TO PROTECT PRIVACY - Daniel J. Solove, The Digital Person: Technology and Privacy in the Information Age (New York University Press, 288pp. $29.95)

    Solove, an associate law professor at George Washington University Law School, looks at the state of privacy in the United States and proposes ways of improving it.

    The problem created by the use of databases stems from an often careless and unconcerned bureaucratic process, one that has little judgment or accountability. The result is that we are heading not just toward a world of Big Brother, but one that is beginning to resemble Kafka’s vision in The Trial, he believes.

    Existing methods for protecting privacy fail because they require individuals to deal with situations they don’t even know exist. The remedy lies in creating a regulatory system, like those that regulate food, the environment and financial institutions, Solove suggests. (DKR)

   MEDIEVAL MYSTERY MANUSCRIPT - Lawrence and Nancy Goldstone, The Friar and the Cipher: Roger Bacon and the Unsolved Mystery of the Most Unusual Manuscript in the World (Doubleday, 288pp. $26)

   The Goldstones have written a witty biography of Roger Bacon, the 13th-century Dominican friar and philosopher who laid the intellectual foundations for the development of science in the West.

   When Bacon challenged the accepted view that what the Bible said was literally true, the Church responded with the intrigues whose twists and turns the authors recount. But the heart of their work is the story of a manuscript discovered in 1912 and known by the name of its owner, Wilfrid Voynich.

   The manuscript is written in an encoded text accompanied by hundreds of illuminations showing a variety of plants, astronomical events, and strings of tiny naked women cavorting in a variety of fountains, waterfalls, and pools. Some experts believe Bacon was the author but the efforts of crack cryptanalysts from the CIA and Britain’s MI-8, as well as the largest computers in the world, have failed to establish who wrote the intriguing work. (DKR)

Issues

   CALL FOR UAVs TO REPLACE NEW STEALTH SATELLITE PROGRAM - An alternative to a classified $9.5 billion stealth satellite program, the subject of a Congressional dispute, would be for the United States to rely more on high-flying UAVs to photograph targets around the world, former government officials and private experts say, according to the New York Times on 15 December. (See "Controversy over New Stealth Satellite," WIN #46-04 dtd 13 December 2004)

   The alternative was included in a classified proposal endorsed by the Senate Intelligence Committee. The committee has tried for over a year to kill the new satellite program that it considers too expensive and unnecessary. Support in the House and the Bush administration has kept the program alive.

   Opponents of the new program point out that the Global Hawk UAV and its possible successors are able to stay within range of a target for hours at a time and would be more effective in monitoring targets than orbiting satellites.

   The Senate committee also wants increased use of other, non-stealth satellite systems, including commercial reconnaissance satellites and Future Imagery Architecture satellites.

   Some government officials question the utility of a stealth satellite, given that countries like Iran and North Korea hide most of their illicit activities. But some private experts hold that stealth satellites could be justified if they have proved useful in gathering intelligence not otherwise obtainable.

   At the request of the NRO, DoJ is considering whether to investigate how details of the classified program were leaked.

   AFIO member Don H. reports U.S. Marines last summer deployed a recently developed UAV, ScanEagle, to Iraq and by November had accumulated over 1,000 hours on ISR missions.  Operating at about 1,500 feet, the four-foot-long UAV with a 10-foot wing span can fly as long as 15 hours while burning less than two gallons of fuel. Images can be sent to forward-deployed troops as well as back to the ground-control station for analysis and further relay.

   The initial version of the bird costs about $100,000, not including the ground station and associated comms. The UAV's electronics suite can be varied depending on the mission. The builders say it is hard to detect at 1,000 feet; a follow-on version is planned for next year with a 30-hour endurance capability, according to an account in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch of 28 November. (Don H., DKR)

   CIA BARRED OFFICERS FROM SPECIAL OPS INTERROGATIONS - The CIA, in a classified directive, barred its officers from taking part in military interrogations in Iraq out of concern for harsh methods used by Special Operations forces, the New York Times reported on 14 December.

   (http://www.nytimes.com/2004/12/14/politics/14intel.html?oref=login&pagewanted=all)

   The directive, issued from Langley and dated 8 Aug. 2003, advised, "If the military employed any type of techniques beyond questions and answers, we should not participate and should not be present," a senior intelligence official told the Times.

   The directive was more restrictive than previously known.  When officials first disclosed the order last September, they said it had barred CIA officers from interviewing the military's prisoners unless military officials were present. DIA complaints about Special Ops treatment of prisoners became public two weeks ago. (See "DIA Officers Say Special Forces Abused Iraqi Prisoners," WIN #46-04 dtd 13 December 2004)

   The restrictive CIA guidelines remain in effect, intelligence officials have said. According to the Times, it was not clear how relations between the CIA and the DIA and Special Ops forces have been affected. The agency continues to take part in the joint task forces in Iraq, but it is unclear whether it is taking part in interrogations, a senior government official said. (DKR)

SECTION V -- CAREERS, NOTES, LETTERS, QUERIES, CORRECTIONS, COMING EVENTS, OBITUARIES

Careers

   Translation Service Seeks Those With Bilingual Skills - TCS Translations works in support of a U.S. Government Task Force comprised of Special Agents of the DHS, Immigration & Customs Enforcement, the DEA and local and state law enforcement officers.    

    TCS has periodic requirements for many languages and is currently seeking an English/Spanish translator for a post in mid-town Manhattan, New York. Travel, per diem and hotel expenses are covered as per U.S. Government guidelines.  Salary is commensurate with experience.

   Most TCS personnel have a current SECRET or TOP SECRET clearance.

   The service has a Web site at http://www.TCSTranslations.com

   Interested individuals should send their resume to Jorge@TCSTranslations.com

Notes

   Goss Picks Republican Flack To Head Public Affairs - DCI Goss has named Jennifer Millerwise as head of public affairs at the agency, UPI reported. Millerwise was a spokeswoman for the Bush-Cheney 2004 campaign.

    Her appointment is not yet final, according to administration officials, but a former senior CIA official confirmed she was Goss's choice. (DKR)

Correction

   Intel Budget Not Declassified – AFIO member Pat K. pointed out on 15 December that "National Intelligence Reform Act Awaits President's Signature" (WINs #46-04 dtd 13 December 2004) incorrectly reported that the Intelligence Reform Act declassifed the annual intelligence budget.

   Pat K. found no provision for declassification in the final version of the act posted at:

http://frwebgate.access.gpo.gov/cgi-bin/getdoc.cgi?dbname=108_cong_bills&docid=f:s2845enr.txt.pdf

   A dispatch dated 18 December in the New York Post reported the 9/11 Commission's hope for disclosure of America's total spy budget was nixed and the number will remain a secret.

   (http://www.nypost.com/news/nationalnews/36704.htm)

   Pat K. also pointed out that although there is no mention of an ombudsman in the act, some of the duties of an ombudsman, contained in other intel reform bills, made it into section 1020 of the final version of the act. (DKR)

Obituaries

   Norman K. Kriebel Jr. - A retired CIA head of station, he died, aged 86, of pulmonary fibrosis on 14 December at home in Bryn Mawr, PA, the Philadelphia Inquirer reported.

   While growing up, Kriebel was a talented ham-radio operator, in contact with operators in Tibet and Nepal. The FCC recruited him in 1945 and two years later he joined the just created CIA. At first a technical information specialist, he later became head of station in Tokyo, Nicosia and London. He retired in 1975.

   Kriebel earned a bachelor's degree from the University of Pennsylvania. During World War II, he was a conscientious objector assigned to alternative service as a "smoke jumper," parachuting into forests in Montana to fight fires.

   His daughter Christine said that when he retired, he volunteered over 2,000 hours to Contact Careline Philadelphia, a crisis hotline. He enjoyed travel and nature photography and had curiosity about everything until the last day of his life, she said.

   In addition to his daughter, he is survived by his wife of 52 years, Suzanne Roseberry Kriebel, another daughter, Linda Day, two grandchildren, and two great-grandchildren.

   Memorial donations may be made to Wissahickon Hospice, 1 Presidential Blvd., Bala Cynwyd, PA. 19004. (DKR)

   John Howard Wyman - A CIA systems analyst, he died, aged 80, of respiratory failure on 13 December after surgery at Inova Fairfax Hospital in Virginia, the Washington Post reported.

   Wyman worked for the CIA from 1952 to 1982 and spent 26 years at the National Photographic Interpretation Center. He was instrumental in applying technology to photographic intelligence gathering and on his initiative the CIA obtained its first digital computer. This was a key component in analyzing photographs taken on U-2 missions and confirmed that the Soviets had put missiles into Cuba.

   In 1963, President Kennedy presented Wyman with the certificate for meritorious service. After retiring from the agency, he received its Career Intelligence Medal.

   Wyman was born and raised in Sycamore, Ill. He served in the Army Air Forces during World War II in Australia and the Philippines. In 1951, he graduated from the University of Wisconsin and also received a master's degree in geography from the same university.

   He enjoyed wildlife and nature, playing bridge and doing the London Times' crossword puzzles. A stickler for proper English, Wyman owned more than two dozen dictionaries.

   He is survived by his wife of 53 years, Barbara Davis Wyman of Fairfax County, two daughters, Martha L. Wyman of Exton, Pa., and Army Col. Mary J. Wyman of Fayetteville, N.C, and four grandchildren. A son, John D. Wyman, died in 2002. (DKR)

Coming Events

   10 January 05 - Washington, DC - Spies on Screen: Behind the Scenes of BBC Video’s MI-5 - International Spy Museum - From suicide bombers to treason, much of the BBC’s hit series MI-5 – seen in the U.S. on A&E – seems dangerously close to the truth about the UK’s security intelligence agency. Discover the difference between fact and act at this thought-provoking, fun, and revealing evening hosted by MI-5 espionage consultant, Mike Baker, former CIA covert field operations officer and current CEO of Diligence LLC. You’ll watch action-packed clips, discuss their inspiration and authenticity, and take home your very own screener of an episode from the series’ second season plus a special bonus feature. Advance copies of the MI-5 Volume 2 DVD will also be on sale at the session, prior to their public release.

   Tickets: $15. Members of The Spy Ring: $12. Space is limited – advance registration required! To register, please email: membership@spymuseum.org or call (202) 654-0942

   FRIDAY, 14 January 2005 - Tyson's Corner, VA - A F I O   W I N T E R   L U N C H E O N - The Hidden Worldwide Struggle Between the United States and Its Enemies -- Islamic Terrorist Extremism - Abroad and Within - Europe's Late Awakening by Dr. George Friedman, Founder/Chairman, Stratfor, Strategic Forecasting, Inc., Author of the recently released and very riveting "America's Secret War" - morning speaker - AND The Political Tug-of-War over Money and Power -The Intelligence Community Restructure Battle by Philip D. Zelikow, Executive Director, 9/11 Commission, National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States, - afternoon speaker -, Problems the Commission faces with adoption of its findings and what he foresees in a restructuring of the intelligence community.

   Time:  10:30 a.m. for badge pick-up. Friedman speaks at 11 am; lunch at noon; Zelikow at 12:45; close at 2 pm. $35/person - current AFIO members and their guests, only.

   Where: Tyson's Corner Holiday Inn.

Reserve right away with Visa, MasterCard or AMEX via email to afio@afio.com, by fax to (703) 991-1278, or by voice to (703) 790-0320. Newly released intelligence books will be on display and on sale.

   15 January 2005: AFIO MAINE - Important member organizational meeting to discuss the chapter program to set the stage for the activities and projects to be undertaken by the chapter during 2005 to further the goals and objectives of AFIO. Membership participation vital. What direction would you like to see the chapter go in and how can you participate? There will also be a ceremony, with special guests, to present AFIO's Stilwell Award to MG Edmund R. Thompson for his service to his country and to AFIO. Meeting takes place in Hank's Room at the Kennebunk Free Library, 112 Main Street, corner of Fletcher, in downtown Kennebunk. All AFIO Maine Chapter meetings are open to the general public. New members welcome. Chapter dues for 2005 are $25. For questions or information contact Barbara Storer, 9 Spiller Drive, Kennebunk, ME 04043. tel. 207.985-2392.

   1 February & 8 February 05  - Washington, DC - Inside Stories: America Held Hostage - 444 Days to Freedom (2 Part Series) - International Spy Museum - When Iranian students took Americans hostage 25 years ago, the U.S. worked feverishly to resolve the crisis – from the failed “Operation Eagle Claw” – to the ultimately successful “Canadian Caper” rescue. Now hear the details – many never-before revealed – from crucial players, including former CIA Director Admiral Stansfield Turner; former CIA officer Tony Mendez; members of the elite Delta Team; former hostage and author of In the Shadow of the Ayatollah: A CIA Hostage in Iran William J. Daugherty; and former U.S. Department of Agriculture Attaché in the U.S. Embassy in Tehran and the “sixth man” of the “Canadian Caper” Lee Shatz. With Mendez moderating their stories about the covert operations, secret negotiations, and rescue missions you’ll find out how it felt to be in their shoes with danger around the corner and the clock ticking. The speakers will also share their thoughts on the Iranian situation today.

   Tickets: $40. Members of The Spy Ring: $35. Space is limited – advance registration required! To register, please email: membership@spymuseum.org or call (202) 654-0942

   8 - 10 February 05 - Arlington, VA - National Intelligence Conference and Exposition (INTELCON) debuts at the Hyatt Regency Crystal City. INTELCON'S goal to bring together intel professionals and members of Congress in an informal setting on neutral ground to provide educational enhancement and discuss common issues. Veteran intelligence specialist John Loftus is directing the INTELCON Program. Based upon the theme of “Widening the Intelligence Community,” the Conference offers five two-day Program Tracks – Federal Civilian, DOD/Military, State and Local Law Enforcement, Business, and Private Sector. There will be eight, full-day Professional Enhancement Seminars, Luncheon and keynote addresses. There will also be a vendor exposition with companies and products relevant to intelligence interests. Its organizer is Federal Business Council of Annapolis Junction, Maryland.

   For more information, please visit: http://www.intelcon.us, or contact: David Powell, Federal Business Council, 10810 Guilford Road, P.O. Box 685, Annapolis Junction, Maryland 20710 Tel. (301) 206-2940, Fax: (301) 206-2950, david@fbcdb.com

    19 February 2005: AFIO MAINE meets to discuss Maine's vulnerable coast. Ensign Mike Glensky from the Coast Guard in South Portland will speak on the vital role of the Coast Guard in protecting Maine under Homeland Security. Meeting is held at Hank's Room at the Kennebunk Free Library, 112 Main Street, corner of Fletcher, in downtown Kennebunk. All AFIO Maine Chapter meetings are open to the general public. New members welcome. Chapter dues for 2005 are $25. For questions or information contact Barbara Storer, 9 Spiller Drive, Kennebunk, ME 04043. tel. 207.985-2392.

   24 February 05 - Washington, DC - Spies of the Kaiser - Lunchtime Author Debriefing and Book Signing - International Spy Museum - In the early twentieth century, the British were obsessed with the possibility of German spies operating in their midst – so much so that all Germans in the United Kingdom were catalogued and eventually interned. Was the German spy threat real? What was German intelligence really up to? Armed with information from untapped German sources and recently declassified British documents, International Spy Museum historian and AFIO member Thomas Boghardt will reveal the true scope of German covert operations, their objectives, and the dramatic British response. Join this author for an informal chat and book signing from 12PM to 1PM. No registration required!

   1 March & 15 March 05 - Washington, DC - Sisterhood of Spies: Shady Ladies in Espionage (2 Part Series) - International Spy Museum - Spies come in all shapes and sizes… sometimes the shapelier the better. Using their often under-estimated intellect and feminine wiles, women have influenced events and gathered critical intelligence throughout history. Who better to blow the cover of the sisterhood of spies than two charter members? Retired Senior U.S. Army Counterintelligence Special Agent Connie Allen and former CIA Chief of Disguise Jonna Mendez will brief you on these shady ladies, exploring the roles held and progress made by women in the world of espionage. Whether you’re interested in Mata Hari’s tactics of seduction, wives with secret lives, Cold War-era operations in Moscow, or the recent “outing” of Valerie Plame, this session is sure to redefine your interpretation of feminine persuasion.

   Tickets: $40. Members of The Spy Ring: $35. Space is limited – advance registration required! To register, please email: membership@spymuseum.org or call (202) 654-0942

   10 March 05 - Washington, DC - Spy Book: The Encyclopedia of Espionage - International Spy Museum - From “Angels” to “Z priorities,” the second edition of the definitive reference to the world of espionage features over 2,500 entries. Spies, agencies, organizations, and operations, are carefully uncovered and detailed in this accurate and accessible resource for aficionado and layman alike. Join authors Norman Polmar and Thomas B. Allen as they discuss intelligence successes and failures throughout history. Join this author for an informal chat and book signing from 12PM to 1PM. No registration required!

     19 March 2005: AFIO MAINE has invited a member of Sen. Susan Collins staff to brief us on the National Intelligence Reform Act. Commitment pending. Meeting is held at Hank's Room at the Kennebunk Free Library, 112 Main Street, corner of Fletcher, in downtown Kennebunk. All AFIO Maine Chapter meetings are open to the general public. New members welcome. Chapter dues for 2005 are $25. For questions or information contact Barbara Storer, 9 Spiller Drive, Kennebunk, ME 04043. tel. 207.985-2392.

   21 - 22 March 05 - Washington, DC - EMININT 2005 - The National Security and Law Society of the American University Washington College of Law is hosting a two-day professional symposium on Emerging Issues in National and International Security. The meeting will address the pressing issues of the day in the fields of national and international security. The symposium will consist of expert panels equally distributed between the fields of foreign policy, intelligence, and law, discussing such topics as: The Risks of Cross-Cultural Profiling; The Emergence of a New Intelligence Mindset; Climate Change, Infectious Disease, and Resource Shortages as Threats to International Security; The Fourth Estate and National Security Policy: Reporters or Watchdogs?; Comparative Counter-Terrorism Policies; Personal Information Privacy in the Post-9/11 World; Homeland Security Law and Private Industry; Whistle-blowing and the Intelligence Community; Torture, Interrogation, and Human Rights in the Global War on Terror; and Reconciling an Active Role for First Responders in Homeland Security with Budgetary Appropriations. The speakers represent the pinnacles of their respective fields, coming from five countries and across the United States. They represent academic experts, senior U.S. government policymakers, and corporate leaders.  They have written books, made laws, established companies, and otherwise shaped the field of National Security.  There is something for everyone in this symposium, and few attendees will fail to take something away from it. Note: This event requires paid registration for non-students.

   For registration or further information, visit http://wcl.american.edu/org/nsls or email nsls@wcl.american.edu. CLE credit is available.

   23 - 24 March 05 - Fairfax, VA - NMIA National Intelligence Symposium - NMIA will hold its annual symposium on 23 Wed - 24 Thurs 2005 at Northrop Grumman Corporation, 12900 Federal Systems Park Drive, Fairfax, VA 22033. For more information, please visit http://www.nmia.org

   6 - 9 April 05 - Chicago, IL - SCIP Annual Conference - At the Hyatt Regency Chicago, an event not to miss. A great organization under new leadership.  Info at: http://www.scip.org/chicago. SCIP is at 1700 Diagonal Rd Ste 600, Alexandria, VA 22314; (703) 739-0696.

   15 - 16 April 05 - Saratoga Springs, NY - Cryptologic Veterans Reunion - The reunion is being organized by the New England Chapter, Naval Cryptologic Veterans Association. Contact Bob Marois, Tel:  (518) 237-0015; E-mail: marois@acp.edu; Website: http://www.ncva-ne.org

    16 April 2005: AFIO MAINE hosts Veteran AFIO member and Univ New Hampshire Professor Doug Wheeler who has agreed to reveal his findings from his research into the circumstances surrounding the death of actor Leslie Howard, one of the last great mysteries of WW II Meeting is held at Hank's Room at the Kennebunk Free Library, 112 Main Street, corner of Fletcher, in downtown Kennebunk. All AFIO Maine Chapter meetings are open to the general public. New members welcome. Chapter dues for 2005 are $25. For questions or information contact Barbara Storer, 9 Spiller Drive, Kennebunk, ME 04043. tel. 207.985-2392.

   18 - 21 April 05 - SFSAFBI Western Regional Conference - For more information, please visit http://www.socxfbi.org/Conference/Conferences.htm

   20 - 21 April 05 - Langley, VA - AFCEA Spring Intelligence Symposium - For more information, please visit http://www.afcea.org/calendar/eventdetails.asp?offset=10&EventID=227

   21 April - Washington, DC - 2005 MOAA Career Fair - DC Convention Center - The Military Officers Association of America is holding their annual Career Fair, to be held at the Washington, DC Convention Center on Thursday April 21, 2005. Join local, national, and international employers -- including Lockheed Martin, AT&T Government Services, Anheuser Busch Companies, Inc., Raytheon, the State Department, and the FBI -- who are there to meet and recruit qualified and proven leaders, and their spouses, to fill a wide variety of key positions. Others seeking to recruit at this event are asked to register before January 14, 2005 for lower fees. The rate of $1,500.00 includes a carpeted 10' x 10' pipe-and-drape booth, company sign, skirted table, two chairs, employer lounge, two lunches, and all-day beverage service. In addition, they receive a link from their website and 60 days of electronic resume access. Booths will be assigned on a first-come, first-served basis. At last year's event, the MOAA reports that over 2,100 candidates (most with security clearances) with leadership, management, and operational experience attended.

   Click on the following link for the 2005 MOAA Career Fair Registration Form: https://www.moaa.org/TOPS/CareerFair2005/registration

   If you have any questions, contact their Career Fair Manager - toll free 877-553-8677 or by email at: moaacareerfair@aol.com

   22 - 24 April 05 - Grapevine, TX - SFSAFBI South Central Regional Meeting - For more information, please visit http://www.socxfbi.org/Conference/Conferences.htm

   25 - 28 April 05 - Philadelphia, PA - 2005 DoDIIS Worldwide Conference - For further details visit http://www.federalevents.com or contact: Howard Blumberg, Government Relations Manager, National Conference Services, Inc. (NCSI), 6440 Dobbin Road Suite C, Columbia, MD. 21045; 888-603-8899, ext. 224 (toll-free) blumberg@ncsi.com, http://www.ncsi.com

   **** 27 - 30 October 2005 - AFIO 30th Anniversary Symposium Celebration - Sheraton Premiere Hotel, McLean, Tyson's Corner, VA and at other secured venues. PUT THIS DATE ON YOUR CALENDARS. ****

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