AFIO Weekly Intelligence Notes #12-08 dated 24 March 2008
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Friday, 25 April 2008 - 10:30 am to 2 pm
AFIO SPRING LUNCHEON

"Technical Wizardry in the U.S. Intelligence Community"

Speaking at 11 a.m. is Dr. Lisa J. Porter, Director of the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA).
Office of the Director of National Intelligence
Dr. Porter [MIT, Stanford] is the first Director of IARPA.
The IARPA sponsors research aimed at game-changing breakthroughs to complement the mission-specific science-and-technology research
being conducted by intelligence agencies.


and

Speaking at 1 p.m. is Jerrold M. Post, M.D., former CIA Psychiatrist,
author of THE MIND OF THE TERRORIST:
The Psychology of Terrorism from the IRA to Al-Qaeda

Space limited. Make reservations at this secure page.

EVENT LOCATION: The Capitol Club at the Sheraton-Premiere Hotel, 8661 Leesburg Pike Vienna, Virginia 22182.
Driving directions here.


Monday, 7 April 2008 (2 PM) - Laurel, MD
Christopher Andrew to give Schorreck Memorial Lecture on
"British Intelligence, the American Alliance, and the End of the British Empire."

The Center for Cryptologic History at the National Security Agency is pleased to announce a lecture by Professor Christopher Andrew of Cambridge University, author of numerous books on intelligence history.  Professor Andrew will present the Second Henry F. Schorreck Memorial Lecture.  This annual series, named for the long-time NSA Historian, began in 2007 when Dr. David Kahn, author of The Codebreakers, presented a talk on "The Future of the Past."  Professor Andrew will speak on "British Intelligence, the American Alliance, and the End of the British Empire."  The lecture will be presented at the Kossiakoff Conference Center on the campus of the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory (located just off U.S. Route 29 at Johns Hopkins Road -- information about the facility and directions can be found here.
Admission is free, but advance registration is required.  Those wishing to attend should send an e-mail to the Center for Cryptologic History at history@nsa.gov.  Please call the Center at 301-688-2336 if you have any questions or need additional information.

Also note the upcoming lecture by the National Cryptologic Museum on 3 April below


AFIO 2008 SPY AUCTION

 The Second AFIO Spy Auction is being planned for late Spring and we are now accepting donated items to add to the auction catalog.
Goal: to raise funds to support AFIO programs in the areas of education, career recruitment, scholarships, seminars, publications, and conferences.
Please help by donating items [books, gift items, historic photos, documents] or services [legal, accounting, career advisory, investigatory] that would be of interest to AFIO Members or the public. Donors receive a tax-deduction receipt for the value their donated items received when auctioned. Items that do not sell are noted with a donation receipt for the property, minus a specific valuation.
 Deadline for auction items will be May 15, 2008. Send inquiries to WassinRichland@aol.com
Mail items to be sold at this auction to AFIO Auction, 6723 Whittier Ave Ste 303A, McLean, VA 22101.


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WIN CREDITS FOR THIS ISSUE:  The WIN editors thank the following special contributors to this issue: ls, pjk and dh.  
All have contributed one or more stories used in this issue. 


CONTENTS

Section I - INTELLIGENCE HIGHLIGHTS

Section II - TERRORISM

Section III - CONTEXT & PRECEDENCE

Section IV - BOOKS, CAREERS, ASSISTANCE NEEDED, ANNOUNCEMENTS AND COMING EVENTS

Books

Careers

Assistance Needed

Announcements

Coming Events

Current Calendar Next Two Months ONLY:

  For Additional Events two+ months or more....view our online Calendar of Events  

Section I - INTELLIGENCE HIGHLIGHTS

CIA Director Mike Hayden Announces Leadership Assignments. CIA Director Mike Hayden announced that Associate Deputy Director Michael Morell will become Director for Intelligence on May 5, succeeding John Kringen. Before becoming Associate Deputy Director in July 2006, Morell held a variety of positions in the Directorate of Intelligence (DI), which provides policymakers with all-source analysis on security opportunities and challenges facing our country overseas. In addition to working as an analyst and manager in the DI, he headed the unit that produces the President's Daily Brief, and served as a presidential briefer. Morell also did a tour of duty overseas and was Deputy Director for Intelligence at the National Counterterrorism Center.

Scott White, a veteran officer who currently serves as Director for Support, will succeed Morell as Associate Deputy Director. The ADD/CIA assists in overall leadership of the Agency, focusing especially on internal management. Over his 28-year career, White has served in leadership and staff positions with the Directorate of Intelligence, the Office of Congressional Affairs, and the National Intelligence Council. From 2002 to 2004, he was Associate Deputy Director for Intelligence. He also has held three senior posts at the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency, most recently Director of Source Operations & Management. [AllAmericanPatriots/12March2008] 

Canadian Spy Agency Expanding Staff and Headquarters. Canada's spy agency hired 100 new intelligence officers last year and is moving ahead with plans to expand its headquarters. In its latest annual report, the Canadian Security Intelligence Service says it will continue to invest heavily in attracting personnel amid threats to national security.

The main focus of CSIS in 2006-07 continued to be terrorism inspired by the ideology of al-Qaeda, and the possibility that Canadians could become radical followers. The intelligence service says it also remained wary of aggressive activities by foreign governments engaged in spying and interference with ethnic communities in Canada. [Globe&Mail/14March2008] 

Zimbabwe to Arrest Western "Spy" Journalists, Official Says. President Robert Mugabe's government will 'flush out' and arrest Western journalists entering Zimbabwe without official permission to cover upcoming elections, the government's senior media official said.
The government last week announced it had excluded observers from any Western country from monitoring the presidential, parliamentary and local government elections on March 29, because, officials said, Western governments believed that 'the only free and fair elections could be won by the opposition.'
Mugabe's victories in the three national elections since 2000 following the emergence of a powerful pro-democracy opposition have been mired in controversy because of violent intimidation and evidence of rigging. Western observers have been barred for the last two elections in 2002 and 2005.
Mugabe, 84, is seeking a further five-year presidential term and faces a major challenge from former labour leader Morgan Tsvangirai, head of the opposition Movement for Democratic Change, and Mugabe's former finance minister, Simba Makoni, who is standing as an independent.
Charamba said about 300 foreign journalists had applied for official accreditation to cover the elections, but 'a team drawn from (the ministries of) information, foreign affairs and the security arms are examining each and every application.'
Charamba claimed there was 'a preponderance' of Western media applying for accreditation for the elections which, he said, was 'giving credence to allegations that these countries want to use the media as a monitoring surrogate.'
He claimed that most of the journalists applying were currently covering the strife in Iraq or were from Kenya where 1,500 people have died in post-electoral violence.
Hundreds of foreign journalists have illegally entered Zimbabwe since Mugabe introduced draconian press laws in 2002. Three have been arrested, but two of them were released when a court found the state had no case against them. The third, Time magazine correspondent Alex Perry, was ordered to pay a minor fine. [Monsters&Critics/16March2008] 

Israel's Shin Bet Launches Spy Blog. Israel's Shin Bet internal secret service has launched a Hebrew-language weblog written by four of its agents. The agents discuss how they were recruited, and what sort of work they perform, and also answer questions sent in by members of the public. The agents are only shown in silhouette.
A Shin Bet official says the idea is to inform the public that the agency offers work beyond just stopping Palestinian paramilitary attacks. [ABC/18March2008] 

Security Agents Foil Attempt to Assassinate Putin. The Tvoi Den newspaper reported on 15 March that security forces foiled an attempt by a sniper to kill President Vladimir Putin near the Kremlin this month. The Kremlin declined to comment on the report by the popular tabloid, which is known for its strong sources in law enforcement circles. Itar-Tass cited a security source denying the report.
Tvoi Den, citing an unidentified source, reported that a sniper was arrested shortly before Putin walked through the gates of the Kremlin on election night, March 2, to appear at a concert held next to the Red Square. The concert was held to celebrate Dmitry Medvedev's victory in the presidential election, and, although the two men walked through the gates together, the newspaper said Putin was the only target of the plot. Tvoi Den printed a photo of a young man from Tajikistan, the suspected sniper, who was arrested in an apartment in a residential building next to Red Square.
The Federal Security Service declined to comment on the report. FSB director Nikolai Patrushev said earlier in the week that his agency had prevented a number of acts of terrorism and sabotage due to coincide with the election. In October, the FSB warned Putin that suicide bombers and kidnappers were preparing to kill or capture him during a visit to Tehran. Putin did not cancel the Iranian trip. [Djurica/Reuters/17March2008] 

Yemeni Describes CIA Secret Jails. A Yemeni man has described being held for nearly three years in secret CIA prisons, or "black sites", around the world and accused the US of torture.
Khaled al-Maqtari told Amnesty International he was held in isolation for more than 28 months without charge or access to any legal representation. He said he first became a US "ghost detainee" at Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq after being arrested there in 2004.
The US has not acknowledged detaining Mr. Maqtari.
US President George W. Bush did acknowledge the existence of black sites in 2006. He said the prisons were a vital tool in the US "war on terror" and insisted that the CIA had treated detainees humanely and had not used torture.
In his first interview since being released by the Yemeni authorities in May last year, Mr. Maqtari described the torture and ill-treatment he said he had suffered at the hands of the US military and CIA while in secret custody. He describes being subjected to international crimes such as enforced disappearance and torture, yet these allegations have never been investigated. 
He said he was initially arrested in Iraq in January 2004, when the US military raided a suspected arms market in Falluja. He is believed to have then been handed to US Military Intelligence on suspicion of being a foreign insurgent. He said he was then transferred to Abu Ghraib, where he alleged he was subjected to a regime of beatings, sleep deprivation, suspension upside-down in painful positions, intimidation by dogs and induced hypothermia. After nine days of interrogation at Abu Ghraib, Mr. Maqtari said he was flown to a secret CIA detention facility in Afghanistan and held there for three months.
Amnesty says it has obtained flight records which show that a plane operated by an alleged CIA front company flew from Baghdad to Kabul nine days after his arrest.
Mr. Maqtari said that while in Afghanistan he was subjected to further torture and ill-treatment, including prolonged solitary confinement, the use of stress positions, sleep deprivation, exposure to extremes of hot and cold, sensory deprivation and disruption with bright lighting and loud music or sound effects.
During the lapses in the music and sound effects, he was able to speak to other detainees and deduced that there were about 20 others being held in the cell around him, including Majid Khan, one of the "high value" detainees transferred to Guantanamo Bay in September 2006, according to Amnesty.
Mr. Maqtari said that in late April 2004 he and a number of other detainees were transferred to another CIA black site, possibly in eastern Europe and held there in isolation for a further 28 months.
Mr. Maqtari was eventually handed over by the CIA in the summer of 2006 to the Yemeni authorities, who continued to hold him without charges until May 2007, the rights group said.
The US state department said it had no comment to give on Mr. Maqtari's case. [BBCNews/14March2008] 

CIA Expands Legal Insurance Coverage for Agency Employees. The CIA announced Monday that it will now pay the full cost of legal liability insurance for about two-thirds of the agency workforce. The insurance costs about $300 a year. Until now the CIA has paid just half of the premium annually. Only about 15 percent of eligible employees actually apply for reimbursement.
The insurance comes from private companies to cover legal expenses that arise out of actions undertaken in the course of a CIA officer's official duties. It is meant to cover potential litigation expenses including damages. It covers legal expenses associated only with those activities undertaken after liability insurance is taken. The reimbursement program began in 2000.
Agency Director Michael Hayden on Monday announced that he had expanded the pool of those eligible to be reimbursed for insurance to include all employees involved in covert activities, not just those involved in counterterrorism and counterproliferation. [IHT/7March2008]

Study Profiles Suicide Bombers. The suicide bombers who have killed 10,000 people in Iraq, including hundreds of American troops, usually are alienated young men from large families who are desperate to stand out from the crowd and make their mark, according to a U.S. military study.
As long suspected, most come from outside Iraq. Saudi Arabia, home of most of the 9/11 hijackers, is the single largest source. And the pipeline is continually replenished by al-Qaida in Iraq's recruiters.
The study, obtained by the Associated Press, profiles the suicide bombers and their support system based in part on interrogations of 48 foreign fighters who were captured or surrendered. The U.S. command is trying to understand the system, including al-Qaida in Iraq's recruiting, training and transportation network, so it can be disrupted before the bombers strike.
According to the summary, interrogators concluded that most foreign fighters are Sunni Muslim men ages 18 to 30, with a mean age of 22. They are almost always single males with no children, and tend to be students or hold blue-collar jobs ranging from taxi drivers to construction and retail sales.
The summary described the majority of fighters as having six to 12 years of schooling, with very few having gone to college. Most come from families in the poor or middle classes and have six to eight siblings. [Quinn/AP/16March2008] 

Czech Civilian Intelligence to be Reinforced by 46 New Employees. The civilian intelligence service (UZSI) will be reinforced in order to better fight terrorism and to strengthen economic and Internet security. The new employees will also assist in securing a new radio-communication center and the Czech Republic's EU presidency in the first half of 2009.
The Czech service is also wants to bolster its intelligence capabilities against Russia. The head of the service warns that the economic dependence on Russia may become a serious problem for the Czech Republic, above all in connection with the oil and gas supplies and prices, as that there is a risk of Russia trying to control the key Czech power utilities. [Ceskenoviny/17March2008] 

Israeli-Made Phone Attracts World Spy Agencies. A new Israeli-made Internet telephone that scrambles messages before they are sent down the line is attracting spy agencies and military clients in Israel and abroad.
Petah Tikva-based Tikal Networks developed its Cryptone phone following a request by the Italian Navy for a secure telecommunications line, the company's CEO, Alex Argov, said.
Unlike other scrambling devices, the Cryptone sends coded Internet protocol (VOIP) technology, Argov said. Encrypted conference calls, voice-mail and videos are tangible solutions for those who fear that someone hostile could be eavesdropping on their conversation, Argov said.
A second device created by Tikal can turn any cellphone conversation into a ciphered exchange, including SMS messages, Argov said, by installing an encoding bluetooth application on the cellphone. [Lappin/JerusalemPost/20March2008] 

U.S. Army Developing Tiny, Flying Spy-Bat. The Center for Objective Microelectronics and Biomimetic Advanced Technology (COM-BAT) at the University of Michigan (U-M) is developing a six-inch spy plane called "The Bat." In addition to scavenging for power, will also come equipped with a bevy of sensors. Stereoscopic cameras and microphones will allow for detailed reconnaissance, while other sensors will detect radiation and airborne poisons.
Currently, the Bat is just a concept, but the U.S. Army has awarded a five year $10 million grant to the College of Engineering at U-M to bring this vision to life. This highly portable and persistent surveillance vehicle will extend soldiers senses and provide a tactical advantage to those in urban environments, where traditional spy-planes are ineffective. [Switched/20March2008] 

Military To Boost Cyber-Protections. The military is beefing up efforts to gather intelligence, fend off cyber-attacks and improve relations with other nations as part of a strategy for keeping the U.S. safe while fighting two wars, according to a Pentagon document.
The four-page plan acknowledges there is still a significant risk that the military cannot quickly and fully respond to another outbreak in the world and outlines what must be done to counter that threat.
Sent to Congress by Defense Secretary Robert Gates and obtained by The Associated Press, the plan relies heavily on building partnerships with other countries. It accompanied a classified risk assessment compiled by Adm. Michael Mullen, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.
The plan provides few specifics and instead maps out six broad areas where improvements must be made. The first on the list is the need to improve the military's ability to gather intelligence.
Saying the U.S. must uncover terror plots before they can be put into action, Gates said the Pentagon is adding more special operations forces, as well as other specialized troops - ranging from linguists to military police officers. [Baldor/AP/19March2008] 

Pentagon Battle Breaks Out Over a Spy Plane. Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates has ordered the Air Force to put nearly all of its unmanned Predator aircraft into the skies over the Middle East, forcing the service to take steps that officers worry could hobble already-stressed drone squadrons.
Pressure from the Defense secretary in recent months has nearly doubled the number of Predators available to help hunt insurgents and find roadside bombs in Iraq. But it has forced air commanders into a scramble for crews that officers said could hurt morale and harm the long-term viability of the Predator program.
Some officers said pressure from Gates resulted in one plan that could have taken the Air Force down a path similar to the German Luftwaffe, which cut back training in World War II to get more pilots in the air.
The surge in drone flights is Gates' latest push for short-term measures to win the Iraq war that will have long-term implications for the U.S. military. In recent months, Gates has campaigned to increase the size of the Army and to ship new, heavily armored troop transporters, known as MRAPs, to Iraq.
Because of the far-reaching implications of the Predator debate, a fight has broken out between the Army and the Air Force over control of one of the most heralded technological successes of the war.
The Army has argued that more overhead drones will save troops' lives, a position largely adopted by Gates. But the Air Force has complained that simply demanding more, with no end in sight, would severely strain the service - just as repeated deployments of ground soldiers has strained the Army.
In the most dramatic example of brinkmanship in the struggle, the plan debated by the military leadership in January would have shut down the Predator training operation in order to increase to 36 the number of Predators continuously flying combat patrols in the Middle East by August.
The plan was dubbed "all in" by its developer, Gen. T. Michael Moseley, the Air Force chief of staff.
Although the most drastic parts of Moseley's "all in" plan have not been carried out, the Predator program has been forced through three makeovers since July, and the service has had to take aggressive steps to meet the new demand.
At first, the Air Force extended the tours of the Predator crews. By September, however, officials began to recall many of the pilots who had completed their Predator duty and left for fighter and bomber assignments elsewhere.
Then, as part of the January deal, Predator and Reaper crews were frozen. Even pilots who have been flying drones nonstop for three years will have to remain in Nevada for at least two more years. Many of them originally were trained as fighter and bomber pilots.
Air Force officials are acutely aware that their concerns may seem like whining, particularly compared with Army counterparts who serve 15-month tours in Iraq and Afghanistan. Still, Predator crews have been working 13-hour days, sometimes six days a week, for three years with no end in sight.
In the debate over control of the fast-growing fleet, the Air Force argues that only qualified pilots should fly airplanes that drop bombs and fire missiles. But Army ground commanders maintain they most need and use the streaming video to plan and execute their ground operations.
Moseley, the Air Force chief of staff, acknowledged the risks of overstretching Predator crews during an interview last month aboard his plane returning from Nellis Air Force Base in Nevada.
He insisted his January plan was not an attempt to fire a warning shot at the Pentagon leadership. As a former war commander - he ran the air war during the Iraq invasion - Moseley said he understood the importance of supplying commanders in Iraq with the aircraft they needed.
Others saw Moseley's plan as an attempt to highlight the potential for long-term damage to the Predator program.
But Pentagon officials familiar with Gates' thinking said he was not likely to let up. As one example, the Air Force is under pressure to give up its insistence that only qualified pilots fly Predators. That would significantly expand the available pool of operators. [Spiegel/LATimes/21March2008] 


Section II - TERRORISM

Spies No Closer to Infiltrating Al-Qaeda. A decade after al-Qaeda issued a global declaration of war against the US, American spy agencies have had little luck recruiting well-placed informants and are finding the upper reaches of the network tougher to penetrate than the Kremlin during the Cold War, US and European intelligence officials said.
Some counter-terrorism officials said their agencies missed early opportunities to attack the network from within. Relying on Cold War tactics such as cash rewards for tips failed to take into account the religious motivations of Islamist radicals and produced few results.
Since the attacks of September 11, 2001, officials said, al-Qaeda has tightened its security, placing a greater emphasis on personal and tribal loyalties to determine who can access its leaders.
At the same time, those agencies have made their task harder by blowing the cover of some promising informants. In January, Spanish police arrested 14 men in Barcelona who they suspected were preparing to bomb subways in Europe. Investigators disclosed in court that the arrests had been prompted by an informant working for French intelligence. The French were forced to withdraw the informant. Spanish authorities said they had no choice; the case rested largely on the informant's word.
US and European spy agencies have largely avoided sending their undercover officers to training camps in Pakistan and Afghanistan. Few operatives, officials said, have the skills, backgrounds and knowledge to talk their way into the camps. [Whitlock/SMH/20March2008] 


Section III - CONTEXT & PRECEDENCE

President Weakens Espionage Oversight. President Bush has issued an executive order stripping the independent Intelligence Oversight Board of much of its authority. 
President Ford created the board following a 1975-76 investigation by Congress into domestic spying, assassination operations, and other abuses by intelligence agencies. The probe prompted fierce battles between Congress and the Ford administration, whose top officials included Dick Cheney, Donald Rumsfeld, and the current president's father, George H. W. Bush.
To blunt proposals for new laws imposing greater congressional oversight of intelligence matters, Ford enacted his own reforms with an executive order that went into effect on March 1, 1976. Among them, he created the Intelligence Oversight Board to serve as a watchdog over spying agencies.
The board's investigations and reports have been mostly kept secret. But the Clinton administration provided a rare window into the panel's capabilities in 1996 by publishing a board report faulting the CIA for not adequately informing Congress about putting known torturers and killers in Guatemala on its payroll.
But Bush downsized the board's mandate to be an aggressive watchdog against such problems in an executive order issued on Feb. 29, the eve of the anniversary of the day Ford's order took effect. The White House said the timing of the new order was "purely coincidental."
Under the old rules, whenever the oversight board learned of intelligence activity that it believed might be "unlawful or contrary to executive order," it had a duty to notify both the president and the attorney general. But Bush's order deleted the board's authority to refer matters to the Justice Department for a criminal investigation, and the new order said the board should notify the president only if other officials are not already "adequately" addressing the problem.
Bush's order also terminated the board's authority to oversee each intelligence agency's general counsel and inspector general, and it erased a requirement that each inspector general file a report with the board every three months. Now only the agency directors will decide whether to report any potential lawbreaking to the panel, and they have no schedule for checking in.
Suzanne Spaulding, a former deputy counsel at the CIA who has worked as a congressional staff member on intelligence committees for members of both parties, said the order "really diminishes the language that calls on the Intelligence Oversight Board to conduct independent inquiries," leaving the panel as potentially little more than "paper pushers."
And Elizabeth Rindskopf Parker, a former general counsel at both the CIA and the National Security Agency who is now the dean of the University of the Pacific law school, said it was unwise for the Bush administration to undermine the Intelligence Oversight Board at the same time that the administration has been pushing for fewer restrictions on its intelligence powers.
But Tony Fratto, a White House spokesman, denied that the order reduced the authority and independence of the panel.
Fratto pointed to a federal statute that makes it a general duty of all government officials to report lawbreaking to the Justice Department. Because of this, he said, there is still a "widely understood background presumption" that the board can contact the attorney general even though Bush deleted the authority to make criminal referrals from its list of core responsibilities.
Fratto also said the changes merely updated the board's responsibilities after Congress in 2004 created a director of national intelligence to run the intelligence community. The order says the director is the person responsible for making any criminal referrals to the Justice Department.
Still, critics contend that the director of national intelligence cannot play the same watchdog role as the oversight board because he is part of the intelligence world, not independent from it, and so there may be occasions in which he has signed off on an activity whose legality might be questioned by outsiders.
Some analysts said the order is just the latest example of actions the administration has taken since the 2001 terrorist attacks that have scaled back intelligence reforms enacted in the 1970s.
In his 1976 executive order, for example, Ford banned intelligence agencies charged with collecting foreign intelligence, such as the National Security Agency, from collecting information about Americans. The Bush administration bypassed that rule by having domestic agencies collect information about Americans and then hand the data to the NSA, The Wall Street Journal reported this week.
Ford's order also banned assassination. But Bush authorized the CIA to draw up a list of Al Qaeda suspects who could be summarily killed.
The administration decided that such targeted killings were an exception to the rule because it was wartime.
In 1978, Congress enacted a law requiring warrants for all wiretaps on domestic soil. But now spies are free to monitor Americans' international calls and e-mails without court supervision if the wiretaps are aimed at targets overseas.
In 1980, Congress enacted a law requiring that the full House and Senate intelligence committees be briefed about most spying activities. The Bush administration asserted that it could withhold significant amounts of information from the committees, briefing congressional leaders instead.
Finally, executive orders were once widely understood to be binding unless a president revoked them, an act that would notify Congress that the rules had changed. But the administration has decided that Bush is free to secretly authorize spies to ignore executive orders - including one that restricts surveillance on US citizens traveling overseas - without rescinding them.
Some critics of the post-Watergate era have contended that its investigations and reforms went too far. For example, Cheney, who was Ford's chief of staff, said in December 2005 that "a lot of the things around Watergate and Vietnam... served to erode the authority, I think, the president needs to be effective, especially in a national security area."
But Frederick A. O. Schwarz Jr., the former chief counsel to the Senate committee that undertook the 1975-76 investigation into intelligence abuses, said that by rolling back the post-Watergate reforms, the Bush administration had made intelligence abuses more likely to occur. [Globe/14March2008] 


Section IV - BOOKS, CAREERS, ANNOUNCEMENTS AND COMING EVENTS

Books

Queenfish: A Cold War Tale. Atop the globe, the icy surface of the Arctic Ocean has remained relatively peaceful. But its depths have boiled with intrigue, no more so than in the cold war.
Although the superpowers planned to turn those depths into an inferno of exploding torpedoes and rising missiles, the brotherhood of submariners - the silent service, both Russian and American - has worked hard over the decades to keep the particulars of those plans hush-hush.
Now, a few secrets are spilling through a crack in the wall of silence, revealing some of the science and spying that went into the doomsday preparations.
A new book, "Unknown Waters," recounts the 1970 voyage of a submarine, the Queenfish, on a pioneering dive beneath the ice pack to map the Siberian continental shelf. The United States did so as part of a clandestine effort to prepare for Arctic submarine operations and to win any military showdown with the Soviet Union.
In great secrecy, moving as quietly as possible below treacherous ice, the Queenfish, under the command of Captain Alfred S. McLaren, mapped thousands of miles of previously uncharted seabed in search of safe submarine routes. It often had to maneuver between shallow bottoms and ice keels extending down from the surface more than 100 feet, threatening the sub and the crew of 117 men with ruin.
Another danger was that the sub might simply be frozen in place with no way out and no way to call for help as food and other supplies dwindled.
The Queenfish at one point became stuck in a dead end. The rescue took an hour and tense backtracking out of what had threatened to become an icy tomb.
"I still dream about it every other week," Dr. McLaren, 75, the book's author, recalled in an interview. "It was hairy." 
After Dr. McLaren's mission, the Arctic became a theater of military operations in which the Soviets tried to hide their missile-carrying subs under the fringes of the ice pack while American attack subs tried relentlessly to track them. The goal was to destroy the Soviet subs if the cold war turned hot, doing so quickly enough to keep them from launching their missiles and nuclear warheads at the United States.
Dr. McLaren commanded one of the Navy's most advanced warships, a jet-black monster the length of a football field.
It was the first of a large class of submarines specially designed for year-round operations in polar regions. As such, it boasted an array of special acoustic gear meant to help it visualize the complex world beneath the pack ice.
For instance, the sub had a special sensor to detect icebergs jutting downward with threatening spikes. From bow to stern, it had a total of seven acoustic sensors pointing upward to help the crew judge the thickness of ice overhead.
As Dr. McLaren recounts in "Unknown Waters," the Queenfish, in preparation for its Arctic voyage, was stripped of all identifying marks and picked up a full load of torpedoes.
It arrived at the North Pole on Aug. 5, 1970, rising through open water. On the ice, an impromptu Santa Claus in a red suit frolicked with crew members.
The submarine then sailed for the Siberian continental shelf, where it began its mission of secret reconnaissance.
Moscow claimed seas extending 230 miles from its shores, including most of the shelf, whose waters averaged a few hundred feet deep. But Washington recognized just a 12-mile territorial limit, and Dr. McLaren was instructed to play by those rules.
As the book recounts, the sub repeatedly ventured within periscope range of Soviet land. In the Severnaya Zemlya archipelago, its crew examined the October Revolution and Bolshevik Islands.
The main mission was to map the seabed and collect oceanographic data in anticipation of the Arctic's becoming a major theater of military operations. The sub did so by finding and following depth contours, for instance, by locating the areas of the Arctic Basin where the seabed was 600 feet below the surface. A result was a navigation chart that bore the kind of squiggly lines found on topographic maps.
The two-month voyage ended in Nome, Alaska, where the sub and crew encountered a chilly reception. The mayor and other people on the town dock had mistaken the sinister-looking sub without markings as Soviet.
In 1972, Dr. McLaren won the Distinguished Service Medal, the military's highest peacetime award.
Historians say cold war maneuvering in the Arctic picked up after his mission, with the two sides deploying more submarines beneath the ice. The United States built a total of 36 sister subs to the Queenfish, known as the Sturgeon class. [Broad/NewYorkTimes/18March2008] 


Careers

Two Job Requisitions for JHU/APL. The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Lab (JHU/APL) for support of on ongoing OSD/NII Defense Command Capability (DCC) Study has two job requisitions:
Position Title: OSD/NII NMO Systems Engineer (Onsite #1)
Location: Crystal City, Virginia
Salary: Senior Professional Staff; Open
Position Description: Provide systems engineering support to OASD(NII) NMO in the development of robust command capabilities for national leadership. Duties: - Participate on technical teams to develop future information sharing and command architectures.
- Perform technical review of systems engineering and architecture products developed by NLCC participants.
- Work with industry, academic, and government laboratory staff to identify opportunities to apply promising emerging technologies to national command applications. - Advocate NMO technical positions to government partners (DISA, STRATCOM, JFCOM, etc.) and contractors. - Assist in the identification of measures and metrics appropriate to New Triad missions and ascertaining the effectiveness of national leadership command capabilities. Education, Skills, Training, Experience, Special Physical Demands:
Required: - BS Degree in an engineering or science discipline - A senior systems engineer with around 20 years experience, including experience in systems development - Experience in C2 systems and communications networks - High degree of flexibility and ability to adjust to changes in direction or scope Desired: - MS degree or PhD in engineering or science discipline
- Prior military experience, particularly in C2 or nuclear C2 - Experience with NMCS, White House military operations, COCOM operations centers, or SLC3S Special Working Conditions: - Base work location at JHU/APL in Laurel, Maryland - Long term (years) assignments on site at work locations in Crystal City, VA - Local travel (DC metro areas, single day trips) approximately 1-2 times per week to Pentagon, contractor-facilities, and sponsor facilities. - Irregular travel within CONUS to sponsor/contractor sites approximately once or twice per quarter. Clearance Needed: Top Secret

For immediate consideration, search and apply at: http://www.jhuapl.edu/employment/#; Keywords: C2, systems engineering, architecture, communications networks

Position Title: OSD/NII NMO Systems Engineer (Onsite #2)
Location: Crystal City, Virginia
Salary: Senior Professional Staff; Open
Position Description: Provide systems engineering and technical management support to OASD(NII) NMO in the development of robust command capabilities for national leadership. Duties: - Assist in planning, organizing, and facilitating technical projects and working groups. - Advocate NMO technical positions to government partners (DISA, STRATCOM, JFCOM, NORTHCOM, HD, etc.) and contractors. - Participate on technical teams to develop future information sharing and command architectures.
- Work with industry, academic, and government laboratory staff to identify opportunities to apply promising emerging technologies to national command applications. - Assist in the identification of measures and metrics appropriate to New Triad missions and ascertaining the effectiveness of national leadership command capabilities. Education, Skills, Training, Experience, Special Physical Demands: Required: - BS Degree in an engineering or science discipline - 20+ years experience in a technical field such as CS, EE, IT, networks, Web services - Experience with C2 operations and policy - High degree of flexibility and ability to adjust to changes in direction or scope Desired: - MS degree or PhD in engineering or science discipline - Prior military experience, particularly in C2 or nuclear C2 - Experience with NMCS, White House military operations, COCOM operations centers, or SLC3S
- Creative individual with forward thinking and good problem solving skills Special Working Conditions: - Base work location at JHU/APL in Laurel, Maryland - Long term (years) assignments on site at work locations in Crystal City, VA
- Local travel (DC metro areas, single day trips) approximately 1-2 times per week to Pentagon, contractor-facilities, and sponsor facilities. - Irregular travel within CONUS to sponsor/contractor sites approximately once or twice per quarter.
Clearance Needed: Top Secret

For immediate consideration, search and apply at: http://www.jhuapl.edu/employment/#; Keywords: C2, systems engineering, technical management, architecture, communications networks


Assistance Needed

Did you know the late Dr. Robert S. Jamar, with CIA Office of Medical Services? I am an associate member of AFIO. I am researching a scholarly history of CIA Office of Medical Services. I would interested in hearing from anyone who may have recollections of the late Dr. Robert S. Jamar. Bob Jamar was a native of Texas who graduated from UT Galveston Medical School in 1955 and joined the Agency in the early 1960s, severing at the NACC base on Taiwan, Bangkok and elsewhere. Around July 1964 to early 1965, at the age of 37, Bob went though JOT Class #18. He later served in a variety of other postings including at the Mazamari camp with the 49th Commandancia in 1967 under Roger McCarthy, and another special salvage mission on the West Coast during the summer of 1974. Any help AFIO members can provide would be greatly appreciated. Thanks, Jonathan D. Clemente, MD. I can be reached at jonathan_clemente@yahoo.com


Announcements

SCIP Annual Meeting 2008, San Diego, California - April 14-17, 2008. SCIP's 2008 International Annual Conference & Exhibition is your opportunity to enhance your skills and increase your value. You can select from more than 70 sessions divided among five key tracks of education necessary for the competitive intelligence professional. In addition, you will have access to pre- and post-conference workshops for more intensive and hands-on professional development.
The Five Tracks of Education Include:  * CI Offense - provides you with tools and techniques that help grow the business including technology, alliances, and new markets.  * CI Defense - protects your business by identifying emerging/latent threats, defensive strategies, economic espionage, early warning systems, and the role CI plays in threat awareness.  * Critical Skills - develops core capabilities and skills for practitioners to develop skills in research planning, data collection, analysis, delivery/dissemination, and utilization by management.  * Professional Effectiveness - increases skills that are not found expressly in your job description: managing projects and resources, dealing with management and internal clients, and navigating though our organization's unique structure, culture, and politics.  * Scholarly Research & Innovation - examines cutting edge new research as well as techniques for educating professionals.  Registrants Receive:  * Access to 17 pre-conference workshops  * Insightful keynote session that will explore a simple, yet profound idea for those who seek to gather intelligence.  * Mark Penn's book, "Microtrends: the small forces behind tomorrow's big changes" Complimentary for full registrants!  * 70+ informative sessions divided among five key tracks of education  * Exposure to 80+ CI vendors and consultants  * Two great networking receptions  * Awards and Recognition Program 
* Conference materials on a convenient CD that you can use immediately.  * Continental breakfast and lunch each day for two days  For more detailed information please click on this link: http://www.scip08.org/


COMING EVENTS

EVENTS IN COMING TWO MONTHS....

26-28 March 2008 - Raleigh, NC - The Fifth Raleigh Spy Conference at the NC Museum of History - Not to miss. Topic: CIA’s Unsolved Mysteries: The NOSENKO Case, Double Agents and Angleton’s Wilderness of Mirrors features top experts in counterintelligence to discuss unresolved issues from the Cold War: “Wilderness of Mirrors” is the theme for the fifth annual Raleigh Spy Conference, an internationally acclaimed event that draws top experts in the field of intelligence to Raleigh each year. The 2008 conference will be held March 26-28 at the North Carolina Museum of History in downtown Raleigh.

Speakers include: -- David Robarge, Chief Historian for CIA and expert on controversial counterintelligence chief James Angleton, will discuss the dissension created at CIA by the former chief of counterintelligence due to his obsessive hunt for a Soviet mole. -- Pete Bagley, the former chief of CIA's Soviet bloc counterintelligence division, will appear at the 2008 conference. According to Reeves, Bagley will discuss his controversial new book on KGB defector Yuri Nosenko entitled Spy Wars: Moles, Mysteries and Deadly Games. Nosenko’s mysterious references to Lee Harvey Oswald, his inconsistent recall and the suspicion he was a KGB plant sent to discredit other defectors kicked off 40 years of unresolved internal strife at CIA. -- Brian Kelley, the wrong man in the Robert Hanssen spy case, and former counterintelligence officer for CIA, will use examples of defectors and double agents he draws on as case models for courses he teaches to train espionage agents. -- Jerry Schecter, former bureau chief for Time magazine in Moscow during the Cold War, later a spokesman for the National Security Council, and a respected expert and author of books on Cold War espionage, will discuss important cases of defectors and double agents in the heat of the Cold War. -- David Ignatius, former foreign editor - now columnist for the Washington Post – and author of espionage fiction, is respected in the "community" for his insights on the impact of defectors and double agents on the craft of espionage. Special Guest M. Stanton Evans, columnist, editor and author of the new book Blacklisted by History: The Untold Story of Senator Joe McCarthy and His Fight Against America's Enemies is a surprise addition to this year’s conference. According to Reeves, Evans used previously classified FBI and governmental files to “upend the McCarthy myth and turn the tables on the real guilty parties. “The Evans book is new and is causing comment”, says Reeves. “Although the McCarthy Era is not part of the conference subject matter, we feel the new book is of great interest to our audience as it deals with penetration of the US government by Soviet operatives.” Tickets to the three-day event are $250 for the general public, $175 for seniors, and $145 for teachers, students and members of the military and intelligence community. Early registration is available by calling Jennifer Hadra or Dan Reeves at 919-831-0999. For more information, go to http://www.raleighspyconference.com

2 April 2008, 6 pm - Las Vegas, NV - The AFIO Las Vegas Chapter evening meeting will feature a tour of the Metro Fusion Center at the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department. The evening will also feature a briefing on "Armor Capabilities." The meeting is open to LV Chapter members, only. Members who wish to bring a guest to the meeting, must first submit the name(s) for the Chapter President's approval. You may email at eppley@nv.doe.gov or call the Chapter Secretary at 702-295-0073 if you have any questions. They look forward to seeing you at this very special meeting! Christine J. Eppley, Chapter Corresponding Secretary 

Thursday, 03 April 2008, 1030 - 1300 - Fort Meade, MD - The National Cryptologic Museum Foundation [NCMF] 2008 program features Dr. Donald Kerr on Technical Issues Facing the U.S. Intelligence Community.This important first program of the NCMF for 2008 features Dr. Donald M. Kerr speaking on important technical issues facing the U.S. intelligence community. ABOUT THE SPEAKER: In October 2007 Dr. Kerr was confirmed by the Senate as Principal Deputy Director of National Intelligence (PDDNI), second in command to Mike McConnell, the DNI. Prior to serving as PDDNI, Kerr was Director of NRO and in 2005 was Assistant to the Secretary of the Air Force. From 2001 through 2005, Kerr served as Deputy Director for Science and Technology at CIA. Dr. Kerr holds a PhD in plasma physics and microwave electronics from Cornell. As a technical expert with extensive top-level experience, he has an impressive insight into the subject area of his presentation on the current issues facing the intelligence community.
LOCATION and TRANSPORTATION: The Museum Foundation is offering transportation from the museum to Booz Allen Hamilton [BAH] Conference Center in the National Business Park. A charter bus will depart from the parking lot in the rear of the museum at 0915 and then return for a second pickup around 0945. Return transportation will begin at 1300 in two shifts. Refreshments will be available in the Center at 0915 and you will have time to socialize with colleagues before taking your seats at 1015.
REGISTRATION: Send $15 by Wednesday, 26 March 2008, if you plan to attend. The $15 fee will cover transportation, refreshments and lunch. Lunch will be served following the presentation at 1200. You may contact us on (301) 688-5436 or at cryptmf@aol.com.

Friday 4 April 2008, 5:30 PM - New York, NY - AFIO Metro New York Chapter Spring meeting features exclusive report by Lt. General Robert J. Elder, Jr. Commanding General of the 8th Air Force, the U. S. Cyber Command on "What we're doing about these cyber attacks on our country – Defending the nation TODAY."
In May 2001, Chinese hackers took down the White House Web Site for almost three hours. According to AIR FORCE Magazine, since then, the attacks originating from servers in China have grown in sophistication and intensity.
Just a year ago, the Naval Network Warfare Command acknowledged that Chinese attacks had reached the level of a campaign-style force-on-force engagement.
Last April 26th came the first full-blown cyber assault resembling an act of war. A controversy over moving a bronze statue of a Russian soldier from the center of Tallinn, the capital of Estonia, ended with a massive, coordinated assault on Estonia's cyber institutions. Many commercial and government web sites were shut down.
On Friday, April 4th, General Elder will reveal the remarkable story of how the newly-established U.S. 8th Air Force is using the electromagnetic spectrum first, as cyber defense, then to conduct cyber missions such as defeating remotely triggered IED's in Iraq, conducting electronic warfare, halting terrorist use of the Global Positioning System and satellite communications and preventing jamming.
Location: The University Club, Fifth Ave at 54th St. Reservations are required and are limited by available space. They will be accepted in the order they are received until room capacity is reached. Admission is $45 to cover meeting costs. Meeting begins at 6:00 PM
TO RESERVE: Jerry Goodwin, 646-696-1828 or by email: afiometro@yahoo.com

Monday, 7 April 2008 (2 PM) - Laurel, MD - Christopher Andrew to give Schorreck Memorial Lecture on "British Intelligence, the American Alliance, and the End of the British Empire." The Center for Cryptologic History at the National Security Agency is pleased to announce a lecture by Professor Christopher Andrew of Cambridge University, author of numerous books on intelligence history.  Professor Andrew will present the Second Henry F. Schorreck Memorial Lecture. This annual series, named for the long-time NSA Historian, began in 2007 when Dr. David Kahn, author of The Codebreakers, presented a talk on "The Future of the Past."  Professor Andrew will speak on "British Intelligence, the American Alliance, and the End of the British Empire."  The lecture will be presented at the Kossiakoff Conference Center on the campus of the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory (located just off U.S. Route 29 at Johns Hopkins Road -- information about the facility and directions can be found here.
Admission is free, but advance registration is required. Those wishing to attend should send an e-mail to the Center for Cryptologic History at history@nsa.gov.  Please call the Center at 301-688-2336 if you have any questions or need additional information.

7 - 11 April 2008 - Boston, MA - The International Association of Law Enforcement Intelligence Analysts (IALEIA), and the Law Enforcement Intelligence Unit (LEIU), will be co-hosting the 2008 Annual Conference in Boston. The conference takes place at the Park Plaza Hotel. This is the only event of its kind for law enforcement intelligence, serving an international audience, and is a "must attend" conference. The training will be first-rate and the opportunities to foster professional relationships with colleagues and peers from around the world will be extraordinary. To register on line, or for more information about the conference, please go to
http://leiu-homepage.org/events/index.php For hotel information and registration, please go to:
http://www.starwoodmeeting.com/StarGroupsWeb/booking/reservation?id=0707030645&key=5C3A5

10 April 2008 – San Francisco, CA – The AFIO Jim Quesada Chapter hosts Rich Hanson on Joint Military and CIA Operations. Hanson's presentation will include a discussion of US Code Title 50, recent history of military and CIA joint operations, his personal experiences locating and reporting on bomb targets in Cambodia, and a discussion of the current state of the “Target Support Group,” as well as current military/CIA relations at Major Command level and at Langley.
The meeting will be held at United Irish Cultural Center, 2700 45th Ave SF (between Sloat and Wawona). 11:30 AM no host cocktails; noon - luncheon. $25 member rate with advance reservation; $35 non-member rate or at door. RSVP to Mariko Kawaguchi (please indicate pot roast or fish) no later than 5 PM 3/27/08: mariko@cataphora.com, (650) 743-2873 or send a check to P.O. Box 117578 Burlingame, CA 94011.

Wednesday, 16 April 2008, 6:30 PM - Washington, DC - Spy vs. Spy: FBI and KGB Secrets from the Cold War - Event held at International Spy Museum."I was beginning to like these guys."-Oleg Kalugin on the FBI surveillance team observing him in Miami, December 1968. Once they worked against each other. Now Oleg Kalugin and David Major are colleagues and friends. In this unique evening the former KGB acting Washington station chief and FBI director of counter-intelligence retrace their exciting careers and how they intersected. They book-ended the espionage career of John Walker-Kalugin supervised the notorious spy and it was to Major's office that the traitor was brought after his arrest. From surveillance to recruitment, all will be shared. As columnist Jack Anderson once wrote, Kalugin's "undercover activities were known to the FBI, but only the State Department knows the reason he is still here." Now that the dust has somewhat settled on their overlapping cases, this is your chance to hear both sides of the story from FBI successes and snafus to KGB plots and procedures.
Location: International Spy Museum, 800 F St NW, Washington, DC, Gallery Place/Chinatown Metrorail Station. Tickets: $20; Advance Registration required. Tickets are non-refundable and do not include admission to the International Spy Museum. To register, call Ticketmaster at 800.551.SEAT or the Museum at 202.393.7798; order online at ticketmaster.com; or purchase tickets in person at the International Spy Museum.

Thursday, 17 April 2008, 12:30 - 2:30 pm - Los Angeles, CA - The AFIO L.A. Chapter luncheon features talk on Belle Boyd and Confederate Secret Service. AFIO Member Frances Hamit will address the group about his upcoming book Belle Boyd and the Confederate Secret Service. Chapter business meeting will follow. Complimentary Buffet Lunch will be served. Francis Hamit is a professional writer who once spent four years in the Army Security Agency between stints at the Iowa Writers Workshop. During the 1980s he worked for the Encyclopedia Britannica where he wrote most of the short articles on various world intelligence agencies and notable figures such as Ralph Van Deman, Edward Lansdale, Yuri Andropov and, yes, Belle Boyd.
He is best known as a journalist but now works mostly as a novelist, playwright and travel writer. His last active duty job, which ended in 1971, was as the NCOIC for the Public Information Division of the U.S. Army Security Agency, Europe in Frankfurt. That's his story and he's sticking to it. He will, in an act of shameless self promotion, be discussing his novel, The Shenandoah Spy, which will be in a new print edition this spring.
Location: Hilton business building located at the Loyola Marymount University [LMU] campus (Playa del Rey).
RSVP to AFIO_LA@yahoo.com no later than April 8, 2008.

Thursday, 17 April 2008, 12 Noon - 1 pm - Washington, DC - The Terrorist Recognition Handbook - A Manual for Predicting and Identifying Terrorist Activities - event held at the International Spy Museum. Terrorists can come from any background, any age group, either gender, and yet somehow they must be identified and neutralized. As an internationally recognized expert, author, and educator on the Iraq insurgency, Jihadist tactics and Al Qaeda's global organization, Malcolm Nance has studied the telltale characteristics of terrorist operations and developed an intelligence-based approach to observing and analyzing behavior for warning signs. In The Terrorist Recognition Handbook he uncovers the terrorists' means, methods, organization, and motivations. He identifies the key steps that every terrorist group will always follow, and how and why groups use and choose their weapons. Join Nance for an eye-opening look at terrorism as the sum of its parts rather than as an incomprehensible force.
Location: International Spy Museum, 800 F St NW, Washington, DC, Gallery Place/Chinatown Metrorail Station. Tickets: Free. No registration required

17-19 April 2008 - London, UK - The German Historical Institute in London hosts "Keeping Secrets" conference. The German Historical Institute in London is hosting a conference entitled "Keeping Secrets:  How Important was intelligence to the conduct of international relations from 1914 to 1939." Among the scholars expected to speak are Zara Steiner, General William Odom, Christopher Andrew, Ernest May, Paul Kennedy, Gerhard Weinberg, Mark Lowenthal, Richard Aldrich, Georges-Henri Soutou, and David Kahn. The conference will take place at the institute in central London from 17 to 19 April. For further information write Karina Kurbach at <kurbach@ghil.ac.uk>

18-19 April 2008 - Great Lakes, IL - The Midwest Chapter of AFIO will host its annual conference at the Great Lakes Naval Station. Registration is $10 per person. Hotel reservations ($62 per night) can be made April 17th-19th by calling the Navy Lodge at 1-847-689-1485. Mention that you are with the Midwest AFIO Chapter. For more information on speakers and meal pricing, please contact Angelo Di Liberti ASAP at 847-931-4184.

Friday, 25 April 2008, 10:30 am - 2 pm - Vienna, VA - AFIO National Luncheon - High Technology Wizardry in U.S. Intelligence Community - Dr. Lisa J. Porter; and Mind of Terrorists by Jerrold Post, M.D.

"Cutting-Edge Technical Wizardry in the U.S. Intelligence Community"

Speaking at 11 a.m. is Dr. Lisa J. Porter, Director of the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA).
Office of the Director of National Intelligence
Dr. Porter is the first Director of IARPA.
The IARPA sponsors research aimed at game-changing breakthroughs to complement the mission-specific science-and-technology research
being conducted by intelligence agencies.


and

Speaking at 1 p.m. is Jerrold M. Post, M.D., former CIA Psychiatrist,
author of THE MIND OF THE TERRORIST:
The Psychology of Terrorism from the IRA to Al-Qaeda

Space limited. Make reservations now at this secure page.

EVENT LOCATION: The Capitol Club at the Sheraton-Premiere Hotel, 8661 Leesburg Pike Vienna, Virginia 22182.
Driving directions here.

Monday, 28 April 2008, 1 p.m. - 5 p.m. - Washington, DC - Symposium on Richard M. Helms, former Director, CIA - His Life and Career. CIA's Historical Collections Division (HCD), Information Review and Release Group, Information Management Services - in concert with Georgetown University, CIRA, and AFIO are hosting a half day symposium in the main auditorium, Gaston Hall, on the life of Richard McGarrah Helms. A group of distinguished panelists will discuss his career in OSS and CIA and his tenure as Director of CIA. A reception will follow at Georgetown's Lauinger Library. Keynote speaker will be CIA Director General Michael V. Hayden, followed by two panel discussions. Panelists include: Brent Scowcroft, former National Security Advisor; Michael R. Beschloss, author; David S. Robarge, CIA Historian; William Hood, author; Dr. Jennifer E. Sims, Director of Intelligence Studies: Center for Peace and Security Studies Georgetown University; and Burton L. Gerber, moderator, Professor in Practice in Intelligence: Security Studies Program, Center for Peace and Security Studies Georgetown University. Cynthis Helms, Richard Helm's wife, will be attending with her son. A display of Helms' mementos, letters, and personal effects will be exhibited in Lauinger Library beginning in April. Very limited space and no available parking at Georgetown. Modest fee-based bus service will be provided by AFIO. Buses to depart from a McLean location and possibly a Chevy Chase location - is being explored. Further information and online reservation forms will be provided at www.afio.com.

Thursday, 29 April 2008 - Washington, DC - Institute of World Politics Open House. The IWP invites you to join them this evening for their monthly open house program to learn more about the programs and career opportunities through graduate study at IWP. Each program begins at approximately 5:30 pm and concludes by 8:00 pm. RSVPs are strongly encouraged, and preferences are easily requested by visiting the IWP home page at www.iwp.edu. The Institute is located at 1521 16th Street NW, Washington, DC, eight blocks north of the White House and three blocks east of the Dupont Circle metro station (red line). IWP enrolls new students during the spring, summer, and fall terms. Make sure you're one of them.

Thursday, 1 May 2008, 12 Noon - 1 PM - Washington, DC - Our Man in Mexico: Winston Scott and the Hidden History of the CIA. Mexico City in the 1960s was a hotbed of spies, revolutionaries, and assassins. In the thick of this Cold War Casablanca was spymaster Winston Mackinley Scott. As chief of CIA's Mexico City station from 1956 to 1969, Scott played a key role in the creation and rise of the Agency. In his new book, Our Man in Mexico, investigative reporter Jefferson Morley traces Scott's career from wartime G-man to consummate intelligence officer with three Mexican presidents on his payroll. But it was Scott's role in the surveillance of Lee Harvey Oswald just prior to President John F. Kennedy's assassination that led to the spymaster's disillusionment. Join Morley for a revealing look at Scott's life and his startling rebuttal of a key finding in the Warren Report.
Where: International Spy Museum, 800 F Street, NW, Washington, DC, Gallery Place/Chinatown Metrorail Station
Tickets: Free. No registration required.

16 - 18 May 2008 - Bar Harbor, ME - The Naval Cryptologic Veterans Association hosts mini-reunion. The NCVA of New England will hold a mini-reunion at the Bar Harbor Regency, Bar Harbor, Maine.  The reunion is open to all personnel that worked for the US NAVSECGRU or its successor organization in NETWARCOM. Contact Vic Knorowski at 518-664-8032 or visit http://ncva-ne.org for information.

Wednesday, 28 May 2008 - Washington, DC - Institute of World Politics Open House. The IWP invites you to join them this evening for their monthly open house program to learn more about the programs and career opportunities through graduate study at IWP. Each program begins at approximately 5:30 pm and concludes by 8:00 pm. RSVPs are strongly encouraged, and preferences are easily requested by visiting the IWP home page at www.iwp.edu. The Institute is located at 1521 16th Street NW, Washington, DC, eight blocks north of the White House and three blocks east of the Dupont Circle metro station (red line). IWP enrolls new students during the spring, summer, and fall terms. Make sure you're one of them.

Wednesday, 28 May 2008, 6:30 pm -The Devil May Care: A Celebration of the New Bond Novel and Ian Fleming's 100th Birthday
What better way to celebrate Ian Fleming's 100th birthday then with a briefing on the newest Bond novel and a shaken, not stirred, icy martini? Sebastian Faulks, author of Birdsong and Charlotte Gray, is now taking on the most famous spy ever. Hear how Faulks channeled Fleming to write "Devil May Care"- a madcap Bond adventure and romantic romp. And then salute Fleming and 007 with a Bondian cocktail. Zola's own in-house expert on "mixology," Ralph Rosenberg, will demystify the popularity of the restaurant's signature cocktails, while you enjoy drinks and hors d'oeuvres, and mingle with James Bond's real-life counterparts. Shaken or stirred? You decide.
Where: International Spy Museum, 800 F Street, NW, Washington, DC, Gallery Place/Chinatown Metrorail Station
Tickets: $32; Advance Registration required. Tickets include martinis, specialty drinks, and hors d'oeuvres from Zola. Tickets are non-refundable and do not include admission to the International Spy Museum. Phone registration only for this program; to register, call 202.654.0930.

Tuesday, 3 June 2008, 6:30PM - Washington, DC - From the Secret Files of the International Spy Museum(tm) Spycraft 101: CIA Spytech From Communism to Al-Qaeda.
Rubber airplanes, messages hidden inside dead rats, and subminiature cameras hidden inside ballpoint pens...a few of the real-life devices created by CIA's Office of Technical Service (OTS). These and other clever technical devices are featured in Spycraft: The Secret History of the CIA's Spytechs from Communism to Al-Qaeda, by the former director of OTS Bob Wallace teams up with espionage gadget collector H. Keith Melton to discuss the operations of OTS...from the Cold War, the Cuban Missile Crisis, and the war on terror. Rare OTS devices including concealments, microdots, and disguises will be on display.
Where: International Spy Museum, 800 F St NW, Washington, DC, Gallery Place/Chinatown Metrorail Station
Tickets: $20; Advance Registration required. Tickets are non-refundable and do not include admission to other the Museum exhibits. To register, call Ticketmaster at 800.551.SEAT or the Museum at 202.393.7798; order online at ticketmaster.com; or purchase tickets in person at the Museum.


For Additional Events two+ months or greater....view our online Calendar of Events

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