AFIO Weekly Intelligence Notes #17-11 dated 3 May 2011

[Editors' Note: The WIN editors attempt to include a wide range of articles and commentary in the Weekly Notes to inform and educate our readers. However, the views expressed in the articles are purely those of the authors, and in no way reflect support or endorsement from the WIN editors or the AFIO officers and staff. We welcome comments from the WIN readers on any and all articles and commentary.]
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CONTENTS

Section I - INTELLIGENCE HIGHLIGHTS

Section II - CONTEXT & PRECEDENCE

Section III - COMMENTARY

Section IV - BOOKS, OBITUARIES  AND COMING EVENTS

Books

Obituaries

Coming Educational Events

Current Calendar New and/or Next Two Months ONLY

NATIONAL EVENTS and ISSUES

DNI
Statement from Director of National Intelligence
James R. Clapper on the Death of Osama bin Laden

In my nearly 50 years in intelligence, never have I seen a more remarkable example of focused integration, seamless collaboration, and sheer professional magnificence as was demonstrated by the Intelligence Community in the ultimate demise of Osama bin Laden.

The careful, diligent work of CIA, NGA, and NSA was simply incredible. It is with great pride and admiration that I offer thanks to all of the dedicated men and women of our community who worked so tirelessly in this achievement.

I want to thank the President for his cool, decisive leadership. The Intelligence Community will never waver in our continued commitment to protect our citizens, our friends, and our allies.

God bless you all, and God bless the United States of America.


Thursday, 2 June 2011, 5:30 to 9 pm - Dayton, OH - CIA Evening Presentation on
"Stories of Sacrifice and Dedication: Civil Air Transport, Air America, and the CIA"
AFIO Members are invited at no charge
to the Thursday evening CIA presentation at the National Museum of the US Air Force
[N.B. - Other parts of the 3-day event are fee-based and must be arranged on your own through Air America Assn]

To register for the June 2nd evening-only Dayton, Ohio CIA event, do so here.
The form also contains links to register for other days of the event.

The CIA, in partnership with the National Museum of the USAF, presents an evening which pays tribute to the sacrifice and dedication of Civil Air Transport (CAT) and Air America (AAM). These special CIA proprietaries were essential for covert operations, providing search and rescue, and photo reconnaissance in east and southeast Asia from the end of WWII through the Vietnam War. The highlight of the event will be the public release of 900 recently declassified documents from CAT and AA corporate files and CIA holdings spanning 1946 to 1978.
LOCATION: At the National Museum of USAF at Wright-Paterson AFB, Dayton, OH. Craig Duehring, retired Asst Secretary of the Air Force serves as keynote speaker. Mr. Duehring served as a USAF forward air controller in South Vietnam and Laos and will share his personal story of being rescued by Air America. Gen. (ret.) John Singlaub, one of CIA's original officers, will be a featured speaker. Gen. Singlaub, CIA's chief of operations for Asia after WWII, oversaw CAT missions throughout the area. The focus of the event will be two specific stories that exemplify the themes of sacrifice and dedication.


AFIO NATIONAL SPRING/SUMMER LUNCHEON

FRIDAY, 3 June 2011 - McLean/Tysons Corner, Virginia
Register HERE

Badge Pick-Up at 10:30 a.m.

Wild Bill Donovan

 

11 a.m. speaker

Douglas Waller

journalist, magazine correspondent, author

on

WILD BILL DONOVAN: The Spymaster
Who Created the OSS
and Modern American Espionage

   

3-course Lunch at Noon

Tiger Trap  

1 p.m. speaker

David Wise

author/journalist

on what will be the first public release of

TIGER TRAP: America's Secret Spy War With China

Check in for badge pickup at 10:30 a.m.
Douglas Waller speaks at 11 a.m.
Lunch served at noon
David Wise - speaks at 1 p.m.
All remarks are On The Record

Event closes at 2 p.m.

 
EVENT LOCATION: The Crowne Plaza
1960 Chain Bridge Road • McLean, Virginia 22102
Driving directions here or use this link: http://tinyurl.com/8228kw
Register HERE

11 - 13 July 2011 - Dungarvan, IRELAND

2nd Annual Global Intelligence Forum by Mercyhurst College's Institute for Intelligence Studies
Last July in Dungarvan, Ireland the Mercyhurst College Institute for Intelligence Studies (MCIIS) hosted this event which explored the nature of analysis and its application in various disciplines, including law enforcement, national security and competitive intelligence, building bridges between analytic practitioners and scholars within those disciplines, and exploring best practices in terms of teaching analytic methodologies. Takeaways for attendees were a deeper and broader appreciation of the value of different analytic methods, which can be borrowed as ―best practices from other disciplines, as well as instruction on the application. Attended by 180 people from 17 countries the forum was very well received.
This year's July 11-13 forum theme will be the relationship between intelligence and the decision-maker and we've gathered an outstanding group of international speakers and panelists (http://globalintelligenceforum.com). In addition we will be offering two proven training courses following the forum one designed for decision-makers in various disciplines and the other for analysts .
Five or more AFIO members that attend will be given a 10% discount on registration. It's a wonderful excuse for a July vacation in Ireland and Dungarvan is a perfect venue (www.dungarvan.com).



Raleigh Spy Conference24 - 26 August 2011 - Raleigh, NC
"Spies Among Us - The Secret World of Illegals"
Theme of the 7th Raleigh Spy Conference

Special guests/speakers: Michael Hayden, former DCIA and DIRNSA; Michael Sulick, former Director of the National Clandestine Service, CIA
Returning presenters:
Brian Kelley
, CIA & Professor at Institute of World Politics;
Nigel West - world-famous intelligence author/speaker - former Member of Parliament;
Dan Mulvenna - RCMP/CASIS
Writer's Roundtable to feature Douglas Waller, author of Wild Bill Donovan, founder of The OSS; Kent Clizbe, author of Willing Accomplices [forthcoming], and other noted writers in the field.

For more information: www.raleighspyconference.com
email: cyndi@metromagazine.com
Location: North Carolina Museum of History, Downtown Raleigh, NC


Section I - INTELLIGENCE HIGHLIGHTS

CIA Analyzing Evidence Seized In Bin Laden Raid. A CIA task force is reportedly analyzing evidence seized in the U.S. military operation that killed Osama bin Laden.

A counterterrorism official speaking on condition of anonymity tells CNN computer equipment, CDs, DVDs and other data storage devices were collected in Sunday's raid on bin Laden's Pakistan compound.

A U.S. intelligence official says investigators are searching the data for signs of any planned terror attacks.

They also hope to find information that could lead them to other top members of al-Qaeda. [Read more: VertexNews/3May2011]

CIA Chief Breaks Silence: U.S. Ruled Out Involving Pakistan in bin Laden Raid Early On. In his first interview since commanding the mission to kill Osama bin Laden, CIA Chief Leon Panetta tells TIME that U.S. officials feared that Pakistan could have undermined the operation by leaking word to its targets. Long before Panetta ordered General William McRaven, the head of the Joint Special Forces Command, to undertake the mission at 1:22 p.m. on Friday, the CIA had been gaming out how to structure the raid. Months prior, the U.S. had considered expanding the assault to include coordination with other countries, most notably Pakistan. But the CIA ruled out participating with its nominal South Asian ally early on because "it was decided that any effort to work with the Pakistanis could jeopardize the mission: They might alert the targets," Panetta says.

The U.S. also considered running a high-altitude bombing raid from B-2 bombers or launching a "direct shot" with cruise missiles, but ruled those options out because of the possibility of "too much collateral," Panetta says. The direct shot option was still on the table as late as last Thursday as the CIA and then the White House grappled with how much risk to take on the mission. Waiting for more intelligence also remained a possibility.

On Tuesday, Panetta assembled a group of 15 aides to assess the credibility of the intelligence they had collected on the compound in Abbottabad where they believed bin Laden was hiding. They had significant "circumstantial evidence" Bin Laden was living there, Panetta says - the residents burned their trash and had extraordinary security measures - but American satellites had not been able to photograph bin Laden or any members of his family. The Tuesday meeting included team leaders from the CIA's counter-terrorism center, the special activities division (which runs covert operations for the agency) and officials from the office of south Asian analysis.

Panetta wanted to get their opinions on the potential bin Laden mission and he quickly found there was not unanimity among his team. Some of the aides had been involved in the Carter administration's effort to go after hostages held by the Iranians 30 years ago; others had been involved in the ill-fated "Black Hawk Down" raid against Somali warlords in 1993. "What if you go down and you're in a fire fight and the Pakistanis show up and start firing?" Panetta says some worried. "How do you fight your way out?"  [Read more:  Calabresi/Time/3May2011]

Osama Bin Laden Death Raises Vengeance Fears. World leaders warned of revenge attacks after Osama bin Laden was killed in a U.S. assault in Pakistan on Monday that brought to a dramatic end the long manhunt for the al Qaeda leader who had become the most powerful symbol of Islamist militancy.

President Barack Obama declared the world was a safer and "better place" with bin Laden dead. But the euphoria that drew flag-waving crowds to "Ground Zero" of the September 11, 2001, attack in New York was tempered by calls for vigilance against retaliation by his followers.

The revelation that bin Laden had been holed up in a compound near Islamabad threatened to exacerbate U.S. tensions with nuclear-armed Pakistan, which had not been told of the raid in advance.

The White House acknowledged there was good reason for U.S. lawmakers, already doubtful of Pakistan's cooperation against al Qaeda, to demand to know whether bin Laden had been "hiding in plain sight" and to raise questions about continued U.S. aid to Islamabad.

Bin Laden was given a sea burial after Muslim funeral rites on a U.S. aircraft carrier. His shrouded body was placed in a weighted bag and eased into north Arabian Sea.

The death of bin Laden, who achieved near-mythic status for his ability to elude capture for more than a decade, closes a bitter chapter in the global fight against al Qaeda, but it does not eliminate the threat of further strikes. [Read more: HuffingtonPost/3May2011]

Allegations Against Canadian Spy May Mean Terror Intelligence Was Compromised. Allegations that an al-Qaida operative plotted terrorist attacks while working as a source for Canadian and British spy agencies may have compromised Canada's terrorism intelligence, a foreign policy expert said Tuesday.

Documents released by WikiLeaks indicate that Adil Hadi al Jazairi Bin Hamlili, a former Taliban member who was held at Guantanamo Bay for over five years, was a "human intelligence" source working for both the Canadian Security Intelligence Service and its British equivalent between 2000 and 2003 until his capture by Pakistani authorities in 2003.

His assumed role as an informant occurred at the same time the U.S. military believes the Algerian-born Hamlili may have been involved in the bombing of a Pakistani church and hotel in 2002.

Wesley Wark, a professor at the University of Toronto's Munk School of Global Affairs, said that the implication of an intelligence source being actively involved in terrorist activities is troubling. [Read more:  Appleyard/Canada.com/26April2011]

Secret Case Against Detainee Crumbles.  Yasim Muhammed Basardah provided information of dubious value about Mr. Gharani.

But there was more to the story, as there so often is at the Guantánamo Bay prison in Cuba. Eight months after that newly disclosed assessment of Mr. Gharani was written by military intelligence officials, a federal judge examined the secret evidence. Saying that it was "plagued with internal inconsistencies" and largely based on the word of two other Guantánamo detainees whose reliability was in question, he ruled in January 2009 that Mr. Gharani should be released. The Obama administration sent him to Chad about five months later.

The secret assessment of Mr. Gharani, like many of the detainee dossiers made available to The New York Times and other news organizations, reflected few doubts about the peril he might have posed. He was rated "high risk," and military officials recommended that he not be freed. But now, a comparison of the assessment's conclusions with other information provides a case study in the ambiguities that surround many of the men who have passed through the prison at Guantánamo Bay. [Read more:  Glaberson&Savage/NYTimes/27April2011] 

Bahrain Expels Iran Diplomat Over 'Spy Link.' Bahrain has ordered the expulsion of a top Iranian diplomat over his alleged links to a Kuwaiti spy ring, ratcheting up already simmering tension between the Gulf neighbors.

Bahrain's state news agency BNA reported on Tuesday that the Gulf Arab state had declared the second secretary in the Iranian embassy persona non grata and ordered him to leave within 72 hours.

It named the official as Hujatullah Rahmani and said Iran's charge d'affaires in Bahrain was summoned on Monday to the foreign ministry to be told about the expulsion order.

Iran said it reserves the right of a "reciprocal reaction" to the expulsion.

"The action taken by the Bahrain foreign ministry aims to divert attention and neglect the realities... these kinds of baseless accusations are contrary to good neighborly relations... and are in line with the divisive intention of foreigners," Ramin Mehmanparast, a foreign ministry spokesman, was quoted as saying on the state television's website on Tuesday.

Bahrain's foreign ministry had on Monday affirmed its "rejection of any interference in the internal affairs of Bahrain and other members of the Gulf Co-operation Council (GCC)" - comprising Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates - the BNA report said.

It also urged the Islamic republic to "end its irresponsible actions, which constitute a grave violation of the norms and principles governing international relations and a threat to regional security and stability." [Read more:  Aljazeera/27April2011] 

Taiwan Official Sentenced for Spying in China. Taiwan's Defense Ministry says a military court has sentenced a defense intelligence official to life in prison for leaking secrets to China.

The ministry said in a statement Thursday that the court found that Lo Chi-cheng spied for China in exchange for money. It said the ruling could be appealed.

Lo was arrested last October after an investigation by the Military Intelligence Bureau. [Read more:  SFGate/27April2011]

Dutch F-16 Pilot Arrested for Espionage. A former Dutch F-16 pilot has been arrested on charges of spying for Belarus, the Telegraaf reports on Thursday.

The man, named as captain Chris V, was arrested on March 17 following a secret service investigation and was said to be on the verge of revealing "one or more state secrets'. [DutchNews/28April2011] 

US Imposes Sanctions Against Syria's Intelligence Service, Officials. The United States has imposed sanctions on the assets of Syria's intelligence service and its director, Ali Mamluk, amid a massive uprising against the regime.

The Washington Post quoted White House officials as saying that the Obama administration has also announced sanctions on Maher al-Assad, a brother of the president and a brigade commander of Syria's 4th Armored Division, and Atif Najib, Mamluk's cousin who is a political operative in Daraa province, and on Iran's Quds Force, a paramilitary division of Iran's Revolutionary Guard Corps.

They claimed that Syria's army unit and the intelligence agency has been playing leading roles in the violent attacks that have left hundreds of people dead since March 16. [Read more:  DailyIndia/30April2011] 

Arrested Terror Suspects Were Planning Attack in Germany. Three suspects, arrested in Germany on Friday, had concrete plans for a bomb attack, according to state prosecutors, and were working for al-Qaeda. Officials said, however, that the men had not yet chosen a target.

The three terrorist suspects arrested in Germany early Friday morning were in the midst of planning a terrorist attack against a large crowd somewhere in Germany, according to Rainer Griesbaum, a deputy federal prosecutor,

The three were detained in police raids in Düsseldorf and Bochum in the state of North Rhine-Westphalia after authorities decided that they might be getting close to carrying out the attack.

One of the three suspects had been drafted by al-Qaeda in 2010 to launch an attack in Germany, investigators said. [Read more:  DW-World/30April2011] 

Death-Penalty Expert to Join Defense Team at USS Cole Trial. The Pentagon has moved one step closer to putting the USS Cole bombing suspect before a capital war-crimes trial at Guantanamo, assigning an Indiana attorney with extensive death-penalty experience to help defend a Saudi-born Yemeni captive who was waterboarded by the CIA.

The appointment of Indianapolis attorney Rick Kammen, who has handled more than a dozen federal and state death-penalty trials, was approved Wednesday by retired Navy Vice Adm. Bruce MacDonald in a letter. Kammen is now authorized to travel to the remote base in southeast Cuba at Pentagon expense to help defend Abd al-Rahim al-Nashiri.

The first order of business for the defense team is to meet MacDonald's June 30 deadline to file notice on why the Pentagon shouldn't go forward with the prosecution as a death penalty case. Navy Lt. Cmdr. Stephen Reyes and New Mexico criminal defense attorney Nancy Hollander have already been on the case.

Seventeen American sailors were killed when al-Qaida suicide bombers slammed a ship laden with explosives into the $1 billion American destroyer off Yemen on Oct. 12, 2000. A Pentagon charge sheet accused al-Nashiri, 46, of orchestrating the attack. [Rosenberg/MiamiHerald/29April2011]


Section II - CONTEXT & PRECEDENCE

How Bin Laden's Most Trusted Courier Led CIA to the Compound Where He Had Been Living for Six Years. American forces were led to Osama bin Laden by his most trusted courier, a Kuwaiti-born man named Sheikh Abu Ahmed.

The shadowy figure was identified after Al Qaeda commanders held at Guantanamo Bay admitted they knew him - and that he had connections to Bin Laden.

But the confessions were only the start of an extraordinary manhunt which stretched from to downtown Peshawar and finally ended in a deadly shootout at the Al Qaeda commander's luxury compound. 

For many years, Ahmed was only known by his 'nom de guerre', Abu Ahmed al-Kuwaiti.

The first indications about his significance came from CIA detainees shortly after the 9/11 terror attacks.

They identified him as one of Bin Laden's couriers, an aide the terror chief trusted with his life.

But details were scant and agents quickly found the trail went cold.

It was not until 2004, when top Al Qaeda operative Hassan Ghul was captured in Iraq, that the CIA made any progress.

Ghul told the CIA that al-Kuwaiti was a courier and that he was close to Faraj al-Libi, who replaced Khalid Sheikh Mohammed as Al Qaeda's operational commander.

Then the U.S. captured al-Libi.

Under CIA interrogation, al-Libi admitted that when he was promoted to succeed Mohammed, he received the word through a courier.

But he made up a name for the courier and denied knowing al-Kuwaiti, a denial that was so adamant and unbelievable that the CIA took it as a lie.

Finally, Khalid Sheikh Mohammed himself admitted that he knew the courier. Held at Guantanmo Bay, he had been waterboarded 183 times without identifying Ahmed.

It was only later under conventional interrogation techniques that he admitted he knew him - though he still did not surrender a full name or where the courier could be found.

The CIA were now convinced that if they found Abu Ahmed they would find Bin Laden. [Read more: DailyMail/3May2011]

Bin Laden Dead - How We Got Him. Trial runs began in early April at Bagram Air Force Base in Afghanistan.

In a sealed-off area known as Camp Alpha, members of a secret group of elite hunters/killers began running through a seemingly impossible mission.

Without advance notice, they would fly through darkness deep into a military garrison city in the heart of Pakistan, assault a heavily fortified compound - then return with the world's most wanted man, dead or alive.

They practiced on a one-acre mock-up of the compound, fighting their way in, fighting their way out, timing and coordinating every move as they tried to anticipate what they would encounter.

Within a few weeks, Navy SEAL Team Six was ready to go - whenever President Barack Obama gave the order.

The command came late last week. [Read more: Steiden/AtlantaJournalConstitution/3May2011]

Bin Laden Operation Burnishes Panetta's CIA Role. At age 72, Monterey native Leon Panetta has done what seemed impossible even a year ago: revive the reputation of the Central Intelligence Agency by killing terrorist mastermind Osama bin Laden.

President Obama had told Panetta to make the capture or killing of bin Laden his top mission. The pieces began coming together in September, shortly after the bin Laden compound in Pakistan was pinpointed, and Panetta began to work directly with Obama on a plan.

Sunday's successful raid on bin Laden's compound in Pakistan caps a two-year tenure for Panetta at the CIA before he heads to a new job as secretary of defense at the start of July. Administration officials said Panetta loved his job at the CIA and was reluctant to leave.

Killing bin Laden had eluded the Clinton and George W. Bush administrations, despite greatly intensified efforts after the 2001 terrorist attacks on New York and Washington. White House counterterrorism chief John Brennan said bin Laden's death was the product of "persistent effort and careful planning over many years."

Panetta issued a statement to CIA employees cautioning that while bin Laden is dead, "al Qaeda is not. The terrorists almost certainly will attempt to avenge him, and we must - and will - remain vigilant and resolute. But we have struck a heavy blow against the enemy. The only leader they have ever known, whose hateful vision gave rise to their atrocities, is no more. The supposedly uncatchable one has been caught and killed."

The operation revealed a new level of coordination across the government's intelligence bureaucracy, whose reputation had been badly tarnished by the CIA's false assessment that late Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein possessed weapons of mass destruction, providing the basis for the U.S. invasion, and later by controversy over the alleged torture of terrorist suspects in secret prisons overseas.

U.S. officials said Monday that CIA interrogators in those overseas prisons developed the information that ultimately led to bin Laden's death. [Read more: Lochhead/SFGate/3May2011]

Silence Is Survival. Back in the 1990s, al Qaeda was scary because of how this group of Islamic radicals was adapting modern communications technology to aid in the planning and execution of terror attacks. Over the last decade, you heard less and less about this. The reason is simple, the al Qaeda use of the Internet, cell phones and other modern communications tech, backfired badly. Western police agencies had, for decades, been developing methods to eavesdropping on these forms of electronic communication. Military intelligence was quick to adapt all this stuff for the war on terror. This was accelerated in Iraq, where many reservists, who were cops in civilian life, got sent there and quickly realized that there was a lot of police work to be done, and pushed for using familiar eavesdropping techniques. The U.S. NSA (National Security Agency) also took the lead in developing ways to eavesdrop in Internet message traffic. The U.S. Air Force also had lots of eavesdropping tech for all sorts of wireless communications.

Thus the Islamic terrorists found that they couldn't even depend on walkie-talkies and short-wave radio for secure communications. Using codes didn't help much either, since the NSA had a large tool kit for that sort of thing. The surviving Islamic terror groups adapted. The most astute dropped the use of Internet, phones and radio almost entirely. Messages were delivered by courier. Leaders accepted the fact they cannot depend on rapid communications, and instead concentrate on building up local intelligence networks, that collect information over weeks or months, and plan local terror attacks, or scare campaigns to keep the locals from talking to the government or foreign troops. [Read more:  StrategyPage/28April2011] 

The Examined Spy: New Insights that Could Make National Intelligence Smarter. The American intelligence system is the world's most sophisticated surveillance network, costing $80 billion a year with 200,000 operatives covering the mapped world, but its work can read like a grand comedy of errors. Notwithstanding all the things America's spies get right, it's hard to ignore the unending parade of major, world-changing events that they missed. There was the failure to connect the warnings before 9/11; the false guarantee that Saddam Hussein had weapons of mass destruction; the assured stability of Arab autocrats up until this January.

In the last decade, the network has only continued to grow, with a key role in informing decisions of war and peace, and the near impossible task of preventing another terrorist attack on American soil. With so much at stake, you would assume the intelligence community rigorously tests its methods, constantly honing and adjusting how it goes about the inherently imprecise task of predicting the future in a secretive, constantly shifting world.

You'd be wrong.

In a field still deeply shaped by arcane traditions and turf wars, when it comes to assessing what actually works - and which tidbits of information make it into the president's daily brief - politics and power struggles among the 17 different American intelligence agencies are just as likely as security concerns to rule the day.

What if the intelligence community started to apply the emerging tools of social science to its work? What if it began testing and refining its predictions to determine which of its techniques yield useful information, and which should be discarded? Director of National Intelligence James R. Clapper, a retired Air Force general, has begun to invite this kind of thinking from the heart of the leviathan. He has asked outside experts to assess the intelligence community's methods; at the same time, the government has begun directing some of its prodigious intelligence budget to academic research to explore pie-in-the-sky approaches to forecasting. All this effort is intended to transform America's massive data-collection effort into much more accurate analysis and predictions.

"We still don't really know what works and what doesn't work," said Baruch Fischhoff, a behavioral scientist at Carnegie Mellon University. "We say, put it to the test. The stakes are so high, how can you afford not to structure yourself for learning?" [Read more:  Combanis/BostonHerald/1May2011] 


Section III - COMMENTARY

How the U.S. Found and Finished Bin Laden. The assault on Osama bin Laden - as quick and ruthless an operation as you would see in any spy movie - shows that the CIA and the military's super-secret Joint Special Operations Command have combined to create what amounts to a highly effective killing machine.

The shorthand for these operations is "find, fix, finish." The CIA and other intelligence agencies typically provide the first two, and the bin Laden attack shows that this process can take years of patient detective work. JSOC warriors then come in for the finish.

A reconstruction of how this operation was put together shows how the pieces of America's counterterrorism policy fit together. It also illuminates one of the CIA's biggest puzzles, which is whether it can work effectively with Pakistan's Inter-Services Intelligence directorate. The answer seems to be "sometimes."

The trail that led to bin Laden's hideout in the town of Abbottabad, about 75 miles north of Islamabad, began between 2002 and 2004 with the CIA's interrogation of al-Qaeda "high-value targets" at secret CIA sites overseas. Several detainees mentioned the "nom de guerre," or nickname, of one of bin Laden's couriers.

Some of the detainees who confirmed the courier's nickname were subjected to "enhanced interrogation techniques," the CIA's formal name for what is now widely viewed as torture. This adds a moral ambiguity to a story that is otherwise one of triumphal retribution and justice.

The CIA spent years trying to figure out the courier's identity. Using sources that U.S. officials won't discuss, the agency finally discovered the courier's real name in 2007, along with the important fact that he had a brother. In early 2009, a team from the agency's counterterrorism center traced him to a compound in Abbottabad that he shared with the brother.

Pakistan was told little about the bin Laden manhunt, for fear that the information would leak. But a U.S. official said the Pakistanis offered some help. "They provided information that helped us identify where one of the brothers might be located," this official said. He added: "They didn't tell us he was in Abbottabad, but their information allowed us to track him there."

Now the agency had a suspect location but no firm idea bin Laden was there. Surveillance confirmed that this was an unusual compound. The surrounding walls were up to 18 feet high, and even the balconies had seven-foot walls. And the compound maintained unusual security: It had no telephone or Internet service, and trash was regularly burned.

As the CIA continued its surveillance, analysts concluded that another family was secretly living in the compound, along with the two brothers. The number of family members and other details matched bin Laden's likely family group. This crucial "circumstantial" evidence was briefed to President Obama last August, says a U.S. official.

This year, JSOC began preparing the "finish" operation, using members of Seal Team 6, its most elite counterterrorism unit. Obama was given a choice between bombing the compound or staging the raid. Obama opted for the latter, believing the United States needed to capture bin Laden's body. [Read more: Ignatius/WashingtonPost/2May2011]

The Best Kind of Military Intelligence. Careful preparation, rather than expensive weapons, took out Osama Bin Laden.

The U.S. Air Force, with its extraordinary range and flexibility, is the best in the world. The U.S. Navy, with its vast aircraft carriers and global reach, has no real rivals. In technological sophistication and sheer firepower, the American military doesn't even have any close competitors, and no wonder: The U.S. government spends more on its military forces than the governments of China, Russia, France, Britain, Japan, and Germany combined.

Yet it was not our sheer military or technological strength that finally finished off Osama Bin Laden on Sunday; it was human intelligence, careful preparation, and patience. We don't know the whole story yet, and we might not hear it for some time. But according to first reports, an intelligence tip-off led U.S. analysts to Bin Laden's trusted courier; observation of the courier then led special forces to Bin Laden's compound, which has now been under surveillance for many months.

In other words, the killing of Osama Bin Laden did not take place in a hail of bombs and bullets, or after a shoot-out involving hundreds of troops. It was the result of careful preparation, followed by the competent execution of a plan. We missed him during the chaotic storming of Tora Bora. We caught him while he was at home in bed. Apparently the whole operation took 40 minutes, and no Americans were killed. [Read more: Applebaum/Slate/2May2011]

U.S. Shakeup and the Blurring Line Between Military and Intelligence. President Obama is expected to announce a major change in U.S. military and intelligence leadership this week, appointing Director of Central Intelligence Leon Panetta to Secretary of Defense and moving General David Petraeus into Panetta's job at the CIA. Petraeus led the U.S. war in Iraq and then CENTCOM, which is in charge of all U.S. forces in the Middle East and South Asia, before being putting in charge of the U.S.-led war in Afghanistan. The move, which stands to tighten the increasingly close bonds between the Pentagon and CIA, could have major repercussions for how the U.S. wages war, in Afghanistan and in the near-global fight against terrorism.

As National Journal's Marc Ambinder and Yochi Dreazen write, the move in many way indicates continuity. The same senior staffers will continue to focus on many of the same tasks. But the staff changes do indicate that the ways in which those staffers approach those tasks will change in important ways. This will be especially significant in Afghanistan and Pakistan, which, since Obama's escalation of the U.S.-led war there in 2009, has been a top focus of both the Pentagon and the CIA.

Just as 2009 saw U.S. military and intelligence attention shift from fighting the war in Iraq to fighting the war in Afghanistan, the focus may now shift once more to fighting terrorism. Petraeus will likely continue the jobs he did as CENTCOM chief and then as military leader in Afghanistan - overseeing U.S. security interests in the Middle East and South Asia - only now using the tools of the CIA rather than of the military. This suggests a quieter approach in the region, led by intelligence rather than by the military. Panetta, in turn, will carry his work on counterterrorism from the CIA to the Defense Department, suggesting that the Pentagon will be thinking less about the large-scale wars in Iraq and Afghanistan and more about how to combat terrorism in those countries and beyond. [Read more:  Fisher/TheAtlantic/27April2011]

Iran Alleges Espionage Over Internet Worm. A senior official in Iran has alleged that foreign governments have been targeting the country's nuclear facilities using an Internet-borne worm, dubbed Stars.

Brigadier general Gholam Reza Jalali, Iran's head of civil defense, on Monday told the Iranian Mehr news agency that the country has detected a new worm that targets government systems. "The damage is very low in the first phase," said Jalali. "The executable files may sometimes be confused with official state documents."

He also warned that although the Stars malware had been discovered - he didn't specify how - researchers still didn't understand its purpose or how exactly it operates, meaning that it might still unleash some type of attack. Finally, he called for legal sanctions against whomever launched Stars.

According to security experts, Jalali's description of the worm makes it sound as if the attack employs malicious Word, Excel, or PDF files, and that echoes a recent series of targeted attacks that have exploited a vulnerability in Flash. But is a worm that targets a government network anything to write home about? In fact, wouldn't the absence of targeted attacks suggest that government agencies simply weren't spotting attacks that were sure to be underway? [Schwartz/InformationWeek/28April2011] 


Section IV - BOOKS, OBITUARIES AND COMING EVENTS


Books

Author Chronicles the Heroic Raoul Wallenberg. Disguised as a Swedish diplomat, Wallenberg left his posh Scandinavian life in July 1944 to rescue more than 100,000 Jews in Hungary during the Holocaust.

The then 32-year-old would secretly distribute counterfeit Swedish passports into the pockets of Jews who were boarded on trains headed to the deadly Auschwitz concentration camp from Budapest.

Wallenberg would then belligerently confront the guards, risking his life, ordering the release of the imitation Swedish citizens and bringing them back to safe houses he owned in Budapest.

His humanitarian crusade was not appreciated by the Soviets, though, who arrested him on Jan. 17, 1945, for being a spy.

No one from the West saw Wallenberg again.

Enter lawyer Morris Wolff, a Philadelphia native, who took the Wallenberg's family's case pro bono and sued the Soviet Union for the unlawful kidnapping and won a settlement of $39 million in 1983. The settlement was never paid. [Read more:  Foster/PhilladelpiaNews/29April2011] 

Historical Note: How Hitler Died. It was April 30, 1945, and Berlin, the capital of Adolf Hitler's tottering Third Reich, was a shattered, flaming inferno. Tanks and troops of Soviet General Vasily Chuikov's Eighth Guards army had fought to within a few blocks of the Reich Chancellery. The end was clearly at hand. Some time after lunch that day, Hitler and his wife of one day, Eva Braun, retired to their suite in the Führer's underground bunker to take their lives. They left instructions that their bodies be burned.

The war was over seven days later. Yet for two decades, mystery shrouded the exact circumstances of the dictator's death. In the West it was surmised, from testimony by Germans who were in the bunker at the time, that Hitler had shot himself. The Soviets said nothing. In a book published last week, Lev Bezymenski, a former Red army intelligence officer, reveals that the Russians not only found Hitler's body after taking the bunker but that they also performed an exhaustive autopsy. It showed that Hitler had died by cyanide poisoning, not by a bullet.

In The Death of Adolf Hitler (Harcourt, Brace & World; $3.95), Author Bezymenski, now a Soviet journalist, says that on May 4, 1945, a Soviet private came across two partially burned, badly disfigured bodies in a shell crater outside the Führerbunker. The Russians, having mistaken another corpse for Hitler's, at first buried the two bodies, but unearthed them again when a Soviet counterintelligence officer had second thoughts. On May 8, a team of Russian forensic experts performed autopsies in a Berlin hospital mortuary. Their full reports are reproduced verbatim in grisly detail that even notes the discovery that Hitler had only one testicle. Glass splinters, apparently from poison ampoules, were found in the mouths of both bodies. There were no visible gunshot wounds - although part of Hitler's cranium was missing - and "the marked smell of bitter almonds and the presence of cyanide compounds in internal organs" led the Soviet doctors to conclude that the deaths of both Hitler and Eva were caused by cyanide. [Read more:  Time.com/1May2011] 

Adapting America's Security Paradigm and Security Agenda. More than half of the world's population lives in struggling and fragile states. Hundreds of armed groups, political movements, and extremists are competing for control of these territories, using irregular techniques. This current environment contrasts sharply with the kind of conflict and wars fought between states in the 20th century.

Yet the U.S. national security system - and those of most allies - is still too calibrated to clashes between major powers rather than the persistent conflicts that are now predominate. The traditional U.S. security paradigm and operational capabilities need adaptation.

The National Strategy Information Center worked with creative senior practitioners from democracies around the world to identify key 21st century actors, their visions, strategic cultures, and techniques. NSIC also examined effective practices from U.S. and foreign experiences.

Adapting America's Security Paradigm and Security Agenda concludes that managing the complex dimensions of the 21st century security environment goes beyond force levels and firepower. [Read more: NSIC/April2011]


Obituaries

Madame Nhu, Vietnam War Lightning Rod, Dies. Madame Nhu, who as the glamorous official hostess in South Vietnam's presidential palace became a politically powerful and often harshly outspoken figure during the Vietnam War, died on Sunday in Rome, where she had been living. She was believed to be 87.

Her death was confirmed by her sister, Lechi Oggeri.

Born in 1924 - the date is uncertain, though some sources say April 15 - she spent the last four decades in Rome and southern France.

Her parents named her Tran Le Xuan, or "Beautiful Spring." As the official hostess to the unmarried president of South Vietnam, her brother-in-law, she was formally known as Madame Ngo Dinh Nhu. But to the American journalists, diplomats and soldiers caught up in the intrigues of Saigon in the early 1960s, she was "the Dragon Lady," a symbol of everything that was wrong with the American effort to save her country from Communism.

In those years, before the United States deepened its military involvement in the war, Madame Nhu thrived in the eye of her country's gathering storm as the wife of Ngo Dinh Nhu, the younger brother and chief political adviser to Ngo Dinh Diem, the president of South Vietnam from 1955 until 1963.

While her husband controlled the secret police and special forces, Madame Nhu acted as a forceful counterweight to the diffident president, badgering Diem's aides, allies and critics with unwelcome advice, public threats and subtle manipulations. Then, after both men were murdered in a military coup mounted with the tacit support of the United States, she slipped into obscurity.

In her years in the spotlight, when she was in her 30s, she was beautiful, well coiffed and petite. She made the form-fitting ao dai her signature outfit, modifying the national dress with a deep neckline. Whether giving a speech, receiving diplomats or reviewing members of her paramilitary force of 25,000 women, she drew photographers like a magnet. But it was her impolitic penchant for saying exactly what she thought that drew world attention.

When, during Diem's early days in power, she heard that the head of the army, Gen. Nguyen Van Hinh, was bragging that he would overthrow the president and make her his mistress, she confronted him at a Saigon party. "You are never going to overthrow this government because you don't have the guts," Time magazine quoted her as telling the startled general. "And if you do overthrow it, you will never have me because I will claw your throat out first."

Her "capacity for intrigue was boundless," William Prochnau wrote in "Once Upon a Distant War: Young War Correspondents and the Early Vietnam Battles" (1995). So was her hatred of the American press.

"Madame Nhu looked and acted like the diabolical femme fatal in the popular comic strip of the day, 'Terry and the Pirates,' " Mr. Prochnau wrote. "Americans gave her the comic-strip character's name: the Dragon Lady."

In the pivotal year of 1963, as the war with the North worsened, discontent among the South's Buddhist majority over official corruption and failed land reform efforts fueled protests that culminated in the public self-immolations of several Buddhist monks. Shocking images of the fiery suicides raised the pressure on Diem, as did Madame Nhu's well-publicized reaction. She referred to the suicides as "barbecues" and told reporters, "Let them burn and we shall clap our hands." [Read more:  Gregory/NYTimes/27April2011] 

Mary Jean Bieck, Intelligence Analyst. Mary Jean Bieck, 79, an intelligence analyst for the Defense Intelligence Agency for more than 30 years, died March 17 at her home in Falls Church. She had multiple myeloma.

Mrs. Bieck joined DIA in 1969, when she was living in Madrid. After settling permanently in Northern Virginia in 1975, she continued working for the agency until 2003, when she retired as a senior intelligence analyst.

Mary Jean Bieck was born in Hollywood and spent much of her youth in Ecuador, where her father was a Foreign Service officer. She graduated from high school in Fort Worth and attended a junior college in the Panama Canal Zone. [Read more:  Schudel/WashingtonPost/27April2011] 

Orlando Bosch, Who Battled Castro with Bazookas and Sabotage, Dies at 84. Orlando Bosch, 84, a Cuban pediatrician turned bazooka-toting militant who plotted to assassinate Fidel Castro and was linked to the 1976 bombing of a Cuban airliner, died April 27 at a hospital in Miami. No cause of death was reported.

To some, Dr. Bosch was a Cuban patriot with a justified cause against Castro's tyranny. To others, including officials at the U.S. Justice Department, he was a terrorist responsible for the deaths of scores of innocents.

As a student at the University of Havana in the 1940s, Dr. Bosch considered himself a close friend of Castro, a classmate whom he called a "brother." The pair used to break a cigar in half and smoke the stubs together at all-night cafes.

But after Castro came to power in1959, Dr. Bosch turned against him. He moved to Miami in self-imposed exile and began to scheme to bring down Castro.

His earliest efforts were haphazard at best. He was arrested in 1964 for towing a jerry-built torpedo through downtown Miami during rush hour.

Two years later, police discovered that Dr. Bosch had six 100-pound bombs stuffed in the back of his Cadillac convertible. He later told the authorities that he was taking them "to a secret base where there was a boat we could use to bomb Castro."

In 1968, Dr. Bosch stood on a bridge over Miami's Biscayne Bay and fired a homemade bazooka at a Polish freighter.

Despite terrible vision - he wore Coke-bottle glasses - Dr. Bosch managed to hit the ship, but the projectile harmlessly plinked off the metal-plated hull and splashed into the water.

When he was arrested, Dr. Bosch said he attacked the vessel because he thought it was headed for Cuba. He was sentenced to 10 years in prison; he served four and was paroled.

Upon his release, Dr. Bosch fled the United States and spent two years in South America, becoming more bent on upending Castro's government.

On Oct. 6, 1976, Dr. Bosch allegedly received a phone call from a comrade-in-arms who told him: "A bus with 73 dogs went off a cliff and all got killed."

The voice on the line had covertly informed Dr. Bosch that a bomb aboard Cubana Airlines Flight 455, bound for Cuba from Guyana, had sent the plane plunging into the ocean. The plane, crashed five miles beyond the coast of Barbados, a refueling stop.

Among the 73 people killed were members of the Cuban national fencing team, several teenagers and a pregnant 23-year-old. [Shapiro/WashingtonPost/1May2011] 


Coming Educational Events

EDUCATIONAL EVENTS IN COMING TWO MONTHS....

MANY Spy Museum Events in April, May and June with full details are listed on the AFIO Website at www.afio.com. The titles for some of these are in detail below and online.

9-12 May 2011 - Orlando, FL - SCIP 2011 International Annual Conference & Exhibition
This is the most important event of the year for Competitive Strategy and Competitive Intelligence professionals. Full information about event and program are here.
The Society for Competitive Intelligence Professionals hosts their annual conference/exhibit at the Buena Vista Palace Resort & Spa in Orlando, Florida. Industry guru, Renee Pruneau Novakoff, Senior Defense Intelligence Analyst and Directorate of Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (J2) with the United States Southern Command, will bring her 25 years of intelligence analysis experience to a "fireside chat" discussion on social media, wargaming and scenario planning.
Encore sessions of some favorites: Tapping Internal Intelligence Networks; Strategy Maps: Competitor Analysis Beyond Four Corners; Competitor Profiling: The Many Needs Behind the Need; Apple's iPhone: An Application of Systematic Innovation for Growth Strategy; Creating a World-Class Intelligence Program; Building a True Real Time Strategic Process Through the Market Intelligence Capability in Your Organization.
Select from over 55 interactive and discover the latest on best practices in Competitive Intelligence including: Mining the CI Rich World of Social Media; How Good is Your Early Warning System (EWS)?; Business Model Innovation
Please contact Matthew McSweegan at 516-255-3812 or matthew.mcsweegan@scip.org to register today.

9-14 May 2011 - Reston, VA - GEOINT Community Week

Ends with 7th Annual GEOGala Black-Tie Dinner. More information available at: http://usgif.org/events/GEOINTCommWeek and dinner-only at http://usgif.org/events/GEOGala

11 May 2011, 11:30 a.m. - Scottsdale, AZ - The AFIO Arizona Chapter features Braden Allenby on "The Challenge of Emerging Technologies, Military Ops, and National Security.

Throughout history, technological evolution and military activity have been linked. The existential challenge to society represented by warfare, combined with the immediate advantage that new technology can deliver, tends to accelerate technological innovation and diffusion. The relationships between the resulting technology systems, and social and security consequences, however, are quite complex, and understanding and managing them to enhance military advantage and long term security is a critical and underappreciated challenge. This is particularly true in the era of the so-called Five Horsemen – nanotechnology, biotechnology, robotics, information and communication technology, and applied cognitive science - when technological change is foundational, rapid and accelerating.
Braden R. Allenby is Lincoln Professor of Engineering and Ethics; professor of Civil, Environmental, and Sustainable Engineering, and of Law; Founding Chair of the Consortium for Emerging Technologies, Military Operations, and National Security; and Founding Director of the Center for Earth Systems Engineering and Management, at Arizona State University.
Location: McCormick Ranch Golf Club, 7505 McCormick Parkway, Scottsdale AZ 85268. For information call Bob Reuss at 480-544-5409 or email rreuss@cox.net.

Thursday, 12 May 2011, 6:30 pm - Washington, DC - "Operation Dark Heart: Spy Craft and Special Ops on the Front Lines of Afghanistan" at the International Spy Museum

In 2001, just after the 9/11 attacks, Lt. Col. Tony Shaffer, a DIA senior intelligence officer, returned to active duty for a 30 month period, during which he commanded a DIA operating base and had two successful, undercover, combat tours to Afghanistan. During these tours he participated in the search for senior al-Qaeda leadership in Afghanistan—recruiting informants and gathering intel to lead to the capture or termination of his targets. Shaffer later wrote about his experiences in the highly controversial Operation Dark Heart. Join Shaffer to hear about his experiences in Afghanistan, his thoughts about the current situation there and his comments on the Operation Dark Heart controversy.
WHERE: International Spy Museum: 800 F St NW, Washington, DC. Gallery Place/Chinatown Metrorail Station
TICKETS: $15 per person. Register at www.spymuseum.org

14 May 2011 - Orange Park / Gainesville, FL - The AFIO North Florida Chapter meets at the Country Club for speaker luncheon.

Speaker TBA. To inquire or sign up, contact Quiel at qbegonia@comcast.net or 904-545-9549.

Wednesday, 18 May 2011, 6:30 pm - Washington, DC - "AREA 51: An Uncensored History of America's TOP SECRET Military Base" at the International Spy Museum

Area 51 sits inside one of the largest government-controlled land parcels in the United States, the Nevada Test and Training Range. It is the most famous military installation in the world—and the most secret. Now, Los Angeles Times Magazine journalist Annie Jacobsen, has written the first book to tell what really goes on at this top-secret location in the Nevada desert, AREA 51: An Uncensored History of America's Top Secret Military Base. Join Jacobsen for the launch of her book, which is based on recently declassified documents and eyewitness accounts from seventy-four individuals linked to the base, and for the world premiere screening of Area 51 Declassified. The show, which premieres on the National Geographic Channel on 22 May, features formerly classified footage and photos from inside Area 51 and draws on the personal testimonies of more than 50 Area 51 veterans. After the screening, Jacobsen and veterans featured in her book and the documentary will comment on the film. The evening will reveal the cutting edge science—from testing nuclear reactions to building super-secret, super-sonic jets to technically supporting the War on Terror—that happens on site. Join us as we explore the facts that are often more fantastic than fiction and decode the mysterious activities of the legendary top-secret base.
Tickets: Free! No registration required! WHERE: International Spy Museum: 800 F St NW, Washington, DC. Gallery Place/Chinatown Metrorail Station

Wednesday, 18 May 2011, 9 am – 1 pm – Ft Lauderdale, FL – The FBI Miami CI Strategic Partnership and NOVA SE Univ present Keith Melton on “Role of Covert Tech in Mumbai Attacks.”

H. Keith Melton – a renowned collector, historian, author, professor and specialist in Clandestine Devices discusses: "The rapid adoption by terrorists of commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) technologies and the Internet  point to more devastating techno-aided attacks in the future."
Location: Nova Southeastern University Rose and Alfred Miniaci Performing Arts Center  3301 College Avenue Fort Lauderdale, FL  33314-7796
Registration/Continental Breakfast will be served from 8:00AM - 9:00AM  Carl Desantis Building/ H. Wayne Huizenga School of Business & Entrepreneurship (Miniaci Theater adjacent to the Carl Desantis Building)
RSVP by May 11th to Cassandra.joseph@ic.fbi.gov  or call 305-787-6446. Be certain to identify yourself as AFIO member.

Thursday, 19 May 2011, 11:30 pm - Colorado Springs, CO - The Rocky Mountain AFIO Chapter hosts Don Shannon, FBI SSA.

The Rocky Mountain Chapter presents Don Shannon, FBI Supervisory Special Agent In Charge of Southern Colorado Joint Terrorism Task Force. Event will take place in the USAF Association's Eisenhower Golf Course Special Meeting Room. If you have any problems getting on to the USAF Academy Grounds, please call 719-459-5474 for assistance.
Please RSVP to Tom VanWormer at robsmom@pcisys.net

Thursday, 19 May 2011, 12 noon - 1 pm - Washington, DC - "Mastermind: The Many Faces of the 9/11 Architect: Khalid Shaikh Mohammed" at the International Spy Museum

Author presentation. Khalid Shaikh Mohammed was behind many of the most heinous terrorist plots of the past twenty years, including the 1993 World Trade Center bombing, the Millennium Plots, and 9/11 itself. Today, Mohammed is at Guantanamo Bay and not talking. Investigative journalist Richard Miniter brings to life his remarkable true story, including his time living among us in the United States. Based on interviews with government officials, generals, diplomats and spies from around the world, Miniter reveals never-before-reported al Qaeda plots and remarkable new details about the 9/11 attacks. He also lets us into the ultimately successful clandestine operations of American and Pakistani intelligence officers to capture this notorious killer.
Where: International Spy Museum: 800 F St NW, Washington, DC. Gallery Place/Chinatown Metrorail Station
TICKETS: Free, no registration required

19 May 2011, 11:30 am - Arlington, VA - The Defense Intelligence Forum meets to hear David Rogus "Brazil and U.S. National Security."

David Rogus, a “retired” Senior Foreign Service Officer, has served worldwide as a naval officer and diplomat with concentrations in the Americas and Northern Europe, and specializations in counter narcotics and law enforcement.  He served as State’s Director of Brazilian and Southern Cone Affairs.  Other assignments have covered Mexico, Cuba, the Caribbean, Iceland where he was Deputy Chief of Mission, the Balkans, and NATO.   Before leaving the Navy as a Lieutenant Commander to join the diplomatic corps, he served as a line and intelligence officer in the Atlantic, Pacific and Mediterranean fleets, and ashore in Viet Nam during the war. After a stint as Lockheed Martin’s Director of Business Development for the Americas, he now heads a business development group in Washington, São Paulo, and Rio de Janeiro.  He holds degrees from Marquette University and the National War College.  Much of his work focuses on Brazil where he lived for eight years as a diplomat and naval officer, including four years with the Brazilian Navy. Dave is known to be a patron of the Garota de Ipanema bar, where the Girl from Ipanema was written, and a guy who enjoys the beaches of Rio. This forum will follow a modified Chatham House rule.  Everything except the speaker's name and subject will be off the record. The Defense Intelligence Forum is open to members of all Intelligence Community associations and their guests. Event location: Pulcinella Restaurant, 6852 Old Dominion Drive, McLean, VA. Mr.
Reserve by 12 May by email to diforum@verizon.net.  Give names, telephone numbers, email addresses, and choice of chicken cacciatore, tilapia puttanesca, lasagna, sausage with peppers, or fettuccini with portabella. Pay at the door by check for $29 per person. Make checks payable to DIAA, Inc. THE FORUM DOESN’T  TAKE CASH!  If you don’t have a check, have the restaurant charge your credit or debit card $29 and give the restaurant's copy of the receipt when you check in.

Thursday, 26 May 2011, 6:30 pm - Washington, DC - "Spies on Screen - Norwegian Ninja" at the International Spy Museum

Norwegian diplomat Arne Treholt was arrested in 1984 and convicted of spying for the Soviet Union and Iraq. Now, the most notorious modern espionage case in Norway undergoes an incredible transformation in the film Norwegian Ninja. Writer/director Thomas Cappelen Malling reimagines Treholt's case as the tale of a Ninja entrusted by King Olav to lead a secret force of enlightened shadow warriors. Join Malling for his first state-side screening of the film the Wall Street Journal calls, "hilarious and menacing, absurd and insightful, and an accomplished work of genre film making that authoritatively upends the cold-war spy thriller." He'll reveal how he was inspired to turn Treholt into a hero and what the real spy thinks of the film.
WHERE: International Spy Museum: 800 F Street, NW Washington, DC. Gallery Place/Chinatown Metrorail Station
TICKETS: $20 per person To REGISTER: www.spymuseum.org

27 - 28 May 2011 - Rijswijk, The Netherlands - 'The Future of Intelligence; Threats, Challenges, Opportunities' by the Netherlands Intelligence Studies Association

At the conference, present and future developments in the field of intelligence and security will be discussed by an array of well-known experts in the field and other participants. There will be plenary sessions and workshops with a focus on specific intelligence,
counterintelligence and global security challenges.
Registration: Registration for the conference will close on 13 May 2011. To register or for additional information visit: http://www.nisa-intelligence.nl
Conference Fee:
Standard Fee: 150 euro; Student Fee: 65 euro (proof of status required) Fee covers registration, one dinner, two lunches and drinks.
Location: Netherlands Defence Academy, Brasserskade 227a, 2497 NX The Hague, Rijswijk.

Visit Netherlands Intelligence Studies Association (NISA)/Stichting Inlichtingenstudies Nederland
http://www.nisa-intelligence.nl

Thursday, 2 June 2011, 5:30 to 9 pm - Dayton, OH - CIA Evening Presentation on "Stories of Sacrifice and Dedication: Civil Air Transport, Air America, and the CIA"

AFIO Members are invited to the Thursday evening CIA presentation which is part of a 3-day Air America Assn 2011 Reunion [N.B. - Other parts of the 3-day event are fee-based and must be arranged through Air America Assn]
The CIA, in partnership with the National Museum of the USAF, presents an evening tribute to the sacrifice and dedication of Civil Air Transport (CAT) and Air America (AAM). These special CIA proprietaries were essential for covert operations, providing search and rescue, and photo reconnaissance in east and southeast Asia from the end of WWII through the Vietnam War. The highlight of the event will be the public release of 900 recently declassified documents from CAT and AA corporate files and CIA holdings spanning 1946 to 1978.
LOCATION: At the National Museum of USAF at Wright-Paterson AFB, Dayton, OH. Craig Duehring, retired Asst Secretary of the Air Force serves as keynote speaker. Mr. Duehring served as a USAF forward air controller in South Vietnam and Laos and will share his personal story of being rescued by Air America. Gen. (ret.) John Singlaub, one of CIA's original officers, will be a featured speaker. Gen. Singlaub, CIA's chief of operations for Asia after WWII, oversaw CAT missions throughout the area. The focus of the event will be two specific stories that exemplify the themes of sacrifice and dedication. To receive material and updates about this event, email us at: afio@afio.com and indicate "CIA June Ohio Symposium" on subject line.

2 June 2011 - San Francisco, CA - The AFIO Jim Quesada Chapter hosts Craig Fair, Acting Section Chief, FBI Counterintelligence Division at Headquarters.

The topic will be on Russian Foreign Intelligence Service's Illegals Network and Investgiation in the US. The meeting will be held at UICC, 2700 45th Avenue, San Francisco (between Sloat/Wawona): 11:30AM no host cocktails; noon - luncheon. $25 member rate with advance reservation and payment; $35 non-member/no reservation. E-mail RSVP to Mariko Kawaguchi (please indicate meat or fish) at afiosf@aol.com and mail a check made out to "AFIO" to: Mariko Kawaguchi, P.O. Box 117578, Burlingame, CA 94011.

Friday, 3 June 2011, 10:30 am - 2 pm - McLean, VA - David Wise discusses Chinese Espionage; Douglas Waller describes the early years of the OSS and Wild Bill Donovan at the AFIO National Spring/Summer Luncheon

Morning speaker is author Douglas Waller on "WILD BILL DONOVAN: The Spymaster Who Created the OSS and Modern American Espionage." Our afternoon speaker is David Wise on what will be his first release of "TIGER TRAP: America's Secret Spy War With China." Register here.

22 June 2011 - San Diego, CA - The AFIO San Diego Chapter hosts San Diego District Attorney, Bonnie Dumanis (and candidate for Mayor) as our guest speaker

To Register or for more information email Darryl at DRT1083@aol.com

11 - 13 July 2011 - Dungarvan, IRELAND. 2nd Annual Global Intelligence Forum by Mercyhurst College's Institute for Intelligence Studies
Last July in Dungarvan, Ireland the Mercyhurst College Institute for Intelligence Studies (MCIIS) hosted this event which explored the nature of analysis and its application in various disciplines, including law enforcement, national security and competitive intelligence, building bridges between analytic practitioners and scholars within those disciplines, and exploring best practices in terms of teaching analytic methodologies. Takeaways for attendees were a deeper and broader appreciation of the value of different analytic methods, which can be borrowed as ―best practices from other disciplines, as well as instruction on the application. Attended by 180 people from 17 countries the forum was very well received.
This year's July 11-13 forum theme will be the relationship between intelligence and the decision-maker and we've gathered an outstanding group of international speakers and panelists (http://globalintelligenceforum.com). In addition we will be offering two proven training courses following the forum one designed for decision-makers in various disciplines and the other for analysts .
Five or more AFIO members that attend will be given a 10% discount on registration. It's a wonderful excuse for a July vacation in Ireland and Dungarvan is a perfect venue (www.dungarvan.com).

24 - 26 August 2011 - Raleigh, NC - "Spies Among Us - The Secret World of Illegals" - theme of the 7th Raleigh Spy Conference

Special guests/speakers: Michael Hayden, former DCIA and DIRNSA; Michael Sulick, former Director of the National Clandestine Service, CiA
Returning presenters:
Brian Kelley
, CIA & Professor at Institute of World Politics;
Nigel West - world-famous intelligence author/speaker - former Member of Parliament;
Dan Mulvenna - RCMP/CASIS
Writer's Roundtable to feature Douglas Waller, author of Wild Bill Donovan, founder of The OSS; Kent Clizbe, author of Willing Accomplices [forthcoming], and other noted writers in the field.

For more information: www.raleighspyconference.com
email: cyndi@metromagazine.com
Location: North Carolina Museum of History, Downtown Raleigh, NC


For Additional Events two+ months or greater....view our online Calendar of Events

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