AFIO Weekly Intelligence Notes #18-11 dated 10 May 2011

[Editors' Note: The WIN editors attempt to include a wide range of articles and commentary in the Weekly Notes to inform and educate our readers. However, the views expressed in the articles are purely those of the authors, and in no way reflect support or endorsement from the WIN editors or the AFIO officers and staff. We welcome comments from the WIN readers on any and all articles and commentary.]
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CONTENTS

Section I - INTELLIGENCE HIGHLIGHTS

Section II - CONTEXT & PRECEDENCE

Section III - COMMENTARY

Section IV - BOOKS  AND COMING EVENTS

Books

Coming Educational Events

Current Calendar New and/or Next Two Months ONLY
 

NATIONAL EVENTS and ISSUES

Thursday, 2 June 2011, 5:30 to 9 pm - Dayton, OH - CIA Evening Presentation on
"Stories of Sacrifice and Dedication: Civil Air Transport, Air America, and the CIA"

CIA_IconThe CIA, in partnership with the National Museum of the USAF, presents an evening which pays tribute to the sacrifice and dedication of Civil Air Transport (CAT) and Air America (AAm). These special CIA proprietaries were essential for covert operations, providing search and rescue, and photo reconnaissance in east and southeast Asia from the end of WWII through the Vietnam War. The highlight of the event will be the public release of 900 recently declassified documents from CAT and AA corporate files and CIA holdings spanning 1946 to 1978.
LOCATION: At the National Museum of USAF at Wright-Patterson AFB, Dayton, OH. Craig Duehring, retired Asst Secretary of the Air Force serves as keynote speaker. Mr. Duehring served as a USAF forward air controller in South Vietnam and Laos and will share his personal story of being rescued by Air America.The focus of the event will be two specific stories that exemplify the themes of sacrifice and dedication.

THREE RSVP/REGISTRATION CHOICES....ALL FREE

1. To RSVP/register as AFIO member and Guest and receive assured seats for the June 2nd evening-only Dayton, Ohio CIA event, do so here.

2. To RSVP as a member of the general public. The event is free and open to the public. No tickets are necessary but seating will be limited to the first 1,000 people. Seating will open at 4:30 p.m. on a first-come, first served basis. Those planning to attend are asked to RSVP by May 31 at http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/CIA2011 or call (937) 255-1670. Refreshments will also be available for purchase throughout the evening. More information from the USAF Museum is here: http://tinyurl.com/3w7o39c

3. To Register for this event PLUS Air America Assn programs before and after June 2, follow the instructions in this PDF from the Air America Assn website:
http://www.air-america.org/Reunion/2011/2011reunionregistration.pdf


AFIO NATIONAL SPRING/SUMMER LUNCHEON

FRIDAY, 3 June 2011 - McLean/Tysons Corner, Virginia
Register HERE

Badge Pick-Up at 10:30 a.m.

Wild Bill Donovan

 

11 a.m. speaker

Douglas Waller

journalist, magazine correspondent, author

on

WILD BILL DONOVAN: The Spymaster
Who Created the OSS
and Modern American Espionage

   

3-course Lunch at Noon

Tiger Trap  

1 p.m. speaker

David Wise

author/journalist

on what will be the first public release of

TIGER TRAP: America's Secret Spy War With China

Check in for badge pickup at 10:30 a.m.
Douglas Waller speaks at 11 a.m.
Lunch served at noon
David Wise - speaks at 1 p.m.
All remarks are On The Record

Event closes at 2 p.m.

 
EVENT LOCATION: The Crowne Plaza
1960 Chain Bridge Road • McLean, Virginia 22102
Driving directions here or use this link: http://tinyurl.com/8228kw
Register HERE

Section I - INTELLIGENCE HIGHLIGHTS

Spy Planes Play an Indispensable Role in Mission. The raid on Osama bin Laden's compound in Pakistan represents probably the biggest success so far of a revolution in military technology: the ability to relay vast amounts of digital imagery through the unblinking eye of robotic aircraft or other spy gear.

Details about the surveillance equipment that may have been hovering overhead, or carried on the ground by Navy commandos, remain undisclosed. But the known state of the military's technology and the insights of informed military insiders suggest that real-time images of the elaborately scripted raid were likely broadcast in situation rooms and command posts halfway around the world.

"That's the real game-changer here," said retired Maj. Gen. Charles Dunlap, a former deputy judge advocate general of the Air Force, referring to the tools of long-term surveillance. "Those capabilities not only resulted in the killing of bin Laden, but also forced him to be virtually incommunicado for years." [Read more:  Hodge/WallStreetJournal/4May2011] 

Spy Betrayed Russian Ring 'For Money.' A top Russian secret service agent suspected of blowing the cover of a sleeper spy ring in the US was a heavy drinker who betrayed Moscow solely to make money, sources said.

Alexander Poteyev, who will go on trial in absentia for treason in Moscow on May 16, is charged with having tipped off Washington about a ring of 10 Russian spies who were later deported in the biggest post-Cold War spy scandal.

The Izvestia daily today published a slew of new information about Poteyev, saying he was linked to Russian defector Sergei Tretyakov, who died last year and had also managed to avoid taking a lie detector test.

A source in the Foreign Intelligence Service (SVR) told the paper the agency believed there was no ideology behind Poteyev's betrayal of the spies, who included the notorious femme fatale Anna Chapman.

"He sold himself in the most banal way. Money and nothing other than money," said the unnamed source. "He has two weaknesses - he loves money and loves drinking."

"What damage he has brought to his country and his colleagues, just because he needed 20,000-30,000 dollars! [TheAustralian/3May2011] 

Ex-CIA Official: Bin Laden Probably Had Help. The former chief of the CIA's Middle East and South Asia division told CNBC he believes people affiliated with the Pakistani government knew Osama bin Laden was hiding in a compound in Abbottabad, Pakistan.

"It's hard to believe that Osama bin Laden was in a large compound in essentially a military town about 30-40 miles north of Islamabad and there were certain people in government who did not know about it, whether they're retired military people, retired intelligence officers," said Michael F. Walker, the former chief of the Middle East and South Asia division of the Central Intelligence Agency.

Walker retired in 2010, and spoke publicly for the first time about what he knows of the CIA's hunt for bin Laden and its relationship with the Pakistani government.

"It does look like there was some assistance from some Pakistani citizens," he said. "You just don't live in a compound for the time he was living there without assistance and help." [Read more:  Javers/CNBC/3May2011] 

US Intelligence Homing In On Bin Laden Allies in Saudi and Pakistani Intelligence Services. Computer files obtained during the Monday morning raid that resulted in the death of Osama bin Laden reveal that the leader of Al Qaeda had the means to contact scores of high-level current and former Pakistani, Saudi and United Arab Emirate intelligence and military officials.

Intelligence sources told the National Security News Service that the names on the computer files include top officials in the Saudi Arabia's General Intelligence Directorate as well as Pakistan's ISI. One CIA source says it is too early to make any conclusions from the initial name checks "because it is possible we don't know why Bin laden had these names. One conclusion is that they were considered allies, but another possibility is that they may have been potential Al Qaeda targets or recruits."

The United States intelligence community has begun the painstaking process of combing through millions of recorded phone calls and emails of officials in the region as well as financial transactions to see if patterns can be ascertained from Bin Laden's contact list. "This process will take months," a DIA official says. A number of task forces inside the US intelligence community have been given every possible resource to make sense out of the Bin Laden data haul. [Read more:  Trento/DCBurea.org/5May2011] 

Iranian Court May Delay Trial of Three Americans, Lawyer Says. An Iranian court trying three Americans charged with espionage and illegal entry into Iran may delay a hearing scheduled for May 11 because of the absence of one of the accused, their lawyer said.

Masoud Shafiei said the court in Tehran requested Sarah Shourd, who left Iran in September 2010 after being released on bail of $500,000, to be present at the hearing.

Her absence "may be used as a pretext for the session to be postponed," Shafiei said today in a telephone interview from Tehran. Shourd, to whom he spoke to yesterday, may not be able to return to Tehran for the hearing "due to health reasons," he said.

Josh Fattal and Shane Bauer were detained with Shourd in July 2009 for illegally crossing into Iran from Iraqi Kurdistan. The U.S. government has said the trio mistakenly wandered across the border during a hiking trip.

Shourd was summoned to return for the trial's first hearing, which was held on Feb. 6. All three, including Shourd who was tried in absentia, entered pleas of not guilty, Shafiei said at the time. [Read more:  Nasseri/Bloomberg/4May2011] 

Obama Administration Urged to Drop CIA Probe in Light of Bin Laden Takedown. In between applauding President Obama for overseeing the successful raid on Usama bin Laden's compound, some Republicans and ex-officials are starting to question what they see as a disconnect: How can the administration be investigating CIA agents whose techniques may have led America to Al Qaeda's top guy?

They're calling on the Obama administration to not only restart the CIA interrogation program in some form, but to end once and for all the Justice Department's probe of CIA employees.

"You can't have it both ways," Rep. Mike Rogers, R-Mich., chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, told Fox News. "You can't have the attorney general prosecuting CIA interrogators, by the way, who may have gotten information that may have aided in catching Usama bin Laden.

"It just doesn't make any sense to me," he said. [Read more:  FoxNews/4May2011]

Military Builds Strong Framework to Exploit Intelligence Data. The Defense Department's wealth of intelligence-collecting technology is surpassed only by its need to break down and analyze the resulting data deluge, and the disparities among services, agencies and offices further muddies the situation.

To address those challenges, DOD is developing and launching the Defense Intelligence Information Enterprise (DI2E) framework, which will integrate all disconnected information, teams, tools and technologies. Using a single, all-encompassing system, DOD and the intelligence community will be able to more easily share information and resources.

"We started talking about the need for a common framework almost two years ago," said Mary Lynn Schnurr, Army intelligence CIO for the deputy chief of staff and director of the Intelligence Community Information Management Directorate.  "We all have special requirements and unique functionalities within each of the services and programs, and we have a lot of different analytical capabilities. But we need to be more attuned to shared and common services, and we need to collaborate more effectively on efficiencies." [Read more:  Corrin/DefenseSystems/3May2011] 

Report: Iranian Leader Gives President Ultimatum Over Spy Chief. Iran's Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei has given President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad an ultimatum over the reinstatement of the country's intelligence chief, a local website reported Friday.

Khamenei, who, according to the constitution, has the final say on all state affairs, last month vetoed Ahmadinejad's decision to dismiss Heydar Moslehi.

The website Ayandeh quoted presidential advisor Morteza Aqa-Tehrani as saying that in a meeting this week between Khamenei and Ahmadinejad, the ayatollah has pushed the president to either accept Moslehi or resign.

Ahmadinejad has not yet made a final decision on the supreme leader's ultimatum, Agha-Tehrani added. [Read more:  MonstersandCritics/8May2011] 

US Spy in Pakistan Outed as White House Demands Intelligence From bin Laden Raid. The White House has demanded that Pakistan hand over intelligence seized from Osama bin Laden's compound as relations between the two allies hit a new crisis over the outing of America's top spy in Islamabad.

Mark Carlton, the purported CIA station chief, was named by a Pakistani newspaper and a private television news network over the weekend, the second holder of that post in less than a year to have his cover blown by the media, presumed to have official consent.

The reports documented a meeting between Mr. Carlton and the head of Pakistan's spy agency, the Inter- Services Intelligence, suggesting that the information came from them.

Washington has refused to comment on the development, which comes amid worsening relations between the US and Pakistan over how bin Laden came to be sheltering in a fortified compound in a garrison town. [Read more:  Philip&Hussain/TheTimes/9May2011] 

Hezbollah Big in Mexico: Terrorists Link Up With Cartels. A terrorist organization whose home base is in the Middle East has established another home base across the border in Mexico.

"They are recognized by many experts as the 'A' team of Muslim terrorist organizations," a former U.S. intelligence agent told 10News.

The former agent, referring to Shi'a Muslim terrorist group Hezbollah, added, "They certainly have had successes in big-ticket bombings."

Some of the group's bombings include the U.S. embassy in Beirut and Israeli embassy in Argentina.

We are looking at 15 or 20 years that Hezbollah has been setting up shop in Mexico," the agent told 10News. [Read more:  AmericanPatrol/8Mayt2011] 

U.S. Raises Pressure on Pakistan in Raid's Wake. President Obama's national security adviser demanded Sunday that Pakistan let American investigators interview Osama bin Laden's three widows, adding new pressure in a relationship now fraught over how Bin Laden could have been hiding near Islamabad for years before he was killed by commandos last week.

Both the adviser, Thomas E. Donilon, and Mr. Obama, in separate taped interviews, were careful not to accuse the top leadership of Pakistan of knowledge of Bin Laden's whereabouts in Abbottabad, a military town 35 miles from the country's capital. They argued that the United States still regards Pakistan, a fragile nuclear-weapons state, as an essential partner in the American-led war on Islamic terrorism.

But in repeatedly describing the trove of data that a Navy Seal team seized after killing Bin Laden as large enough to fill a small college library, Mr. Donilon seemed to be warning the Pakistanis that the United States might soon have documentary evidence that could illuminate who, inside or outside their government, might have helped harbor Bin Laden, the leader of Al Qaeda, who had been the world's most wanted terrorist. [Read more:  Sanger/NYTimes/9May2011] 

Al-Qaeda Remains Dangerous Terror Outfit: US Intelligence. Al-Qaeda, though damaged by Osama bin Laden's death, remains a dangerous terror outfit for the US and rest of the world, American intelligence agencies have concluded following a preliminary assessment of information gleaned from a huge cache of material recovered from the dreaded terrorist's Abbottabad hideout.

"In the wake of this major counter-terrorism success, the intelligence community remains squarely focused on the safety of the American people. We will sustain intense pressure on al-Qaeda and other terrorist groups. Al-Qaeda is damaged by bin Laden's death, but the group remains dangerous," a senior US intelligence official said.

"They've been on their heels for some time. I mean, they've suffered extensive damage, and the fact that bin Laden is off the streets only exacerbates that damage for them, and that's good for the United States and our allies," the official said on the condition of anonymity.

As a result of the US raid at the Abbottabad hideout of bin Laden during which he was killed, the US has acquired the single largest collection of terrorist material ever.

The material is currently being reviewed, the official said adding that it already provided some important insights. "We expect to learn more about al-Qaeda and its affiliates, their plans and intentions, and any threats they currently pose." [Read more:  EconomicTimes/8May2011] 

Congress Bans Scientific Collaboration with China, Cites High Espionage Risks. A two-sentence clause included in the U.S. spending bill approved by Congress a few weeks ago threatens to reverse more than three decades of constructive U.S. engagement with the People's Republic of China.

The clause prohibits the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) from coordinating any joint scientific activity with China.

Representative Frank Wolf (R-VA), a long-time critic of the Chinese government who chairs a House spending committee that oversees several science agencies, inserted the language into the spending legislation to prevent NASA or OSTP from using federal funds "to develop, design, plan, promulgate, implement or execute a bilateral policy, program, order, or contract of any kind to participate, collaborate, or coordinate bilaterally in any way with China or any Chinese-owned company."

By prohibiting the OSTP from working with China, Wolf claims the ban will bear on "the entire bilateral relationship on science and technology."

"It's the whole ball of wax," said Wolf in an interview with Science Insider William Pentland [Read more:  Pentland/Forbes/7May2011] 


Section II - CONTEXT & PRECEDENCE

Pakistan's Shadowy Secret Service, the ISI. Pakistan's directorate for Inter-Services Intelligence, or ISI, is once again facing accusations of double-standards over its role in the fight against al-Qaeda and the Taliban.

Many observers find it hard to believe the organization had no idea that Osama Bin Laden had been living under the nose of the Pakistani military until his death.

As to the US special forces raid that killed the al-Qaeda leader, questions abound about what the ISI knew and when it knew it.

Similar Western doubts over the ISI's loyalties have been a recurring theme in recent years.

In documents leaked in April 2011 on the Wikileaks website, US authorities described the ISI as a "terrorist" organization on a par with al-Qaeda and the Taliban.

In the same month the US military's top officer, Admiral Mike Mullen, also accused the ISI of having links with the Taliban.

He said it had a "long-standing relationship" with a militant group run by Afghan insurgent Jalaluddin Haqqani, which targets US troops in Afghanistan.

The list does not end there.

In June 2010 the ISI was accused of giving funding, training and sanctuary to the Afghan Taliban on a scale much larger than previously thought. [Read more:  BBC/3May2011] 

Interview with Head of German Intelligence: 'Al-Qaida Faces Difficult Times Ahead.'  Ernst Uhrlau is the head of Germany's foreign intelligence agency, the BND. In a SPIEGEL interview he talks about the consequences of Osama bin Laden's death for al-Qaida and his expectation that the organization will carry out terror attacks in the near future.

SPIEGEL: How severe a blow to al-Qaida is the death of Osama bin Laden?

Uhrlau: For al-Qaida as a whole - in other words, both the core organization and the regional organizations - Bin Laden's death marks the loss of its undisputed main symbolic and leading figure. He had not been centrally involved in operations for some time, but he remained the main source of ideological thinking and chief strategist. Bin Laden decided whether groups like today's Al-Qaida in the Islamic Maghreb or Al-Qaida in Iraq were to be allowed to join the network. The oath of allegiance was made to bin Laden, not the organization. In the past, various financial backers had based their support for the network on bin Laden as a symbolic figure and on his origins in Saudi Arabia and Yemen. Whether this funding will continue to flow is now very questionable. The same applies to the supporters who have sworn their oath of allegiance to him. It isn't clear whether they will obey a successor.

SPIEGEL: Is bin Laden's death the end of al-Qaida?

Uhrlau: No, but the individual al-Qaida groups will continue to become more independent. We will see stronger regionalization, and although the ideological principles of bin Laden will still apply, individual organizations in places like the Maghreb or the Arabian Peninsula will operate independently of one another. It is completely unclear what will happen next with the so-called core al-Qaida in Afghanistan and Pakistan.

SPIEGEL: It had been suspected that bin Laden was hiding out in caves. Did it surprise you that he was living in a villa?

Uhrlau: We saw a similar pattern with Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, Abu Zubaydah and Ramzi Binalshibh, who had all gone underground in major Pakistani cities. Perhaps bin Laden was simply depending on the element of surprise. [Read more:  Spiegel/8May2011]

How a Networking Immigrant Became a Spy. Locked in a federal penitentiary in the Arizona desert, Tai Kuo spends his days helping with the cooking, teaching language classes and tennis, making new friends.

The convicted spy, it seems, has become a mentor.

This surprises no one. Not the prosecutors who charged him. Not his old friends or colleagues, some of whom stand behind him still.

Because Tai Kuo is nothing if not likable. It's the very quality that allowed him to get close to people in high places. Politicians. Army brass.

His attorney, Plato Cacheris, says, "We have represented over the years a lot of scoundrels." But Kuo "is not in that category. ... You always wanted to help him, if you will."

He wasn't a professional agent by any means. He was a tennis coach. A restaurateur. A businessman who lived with his wife and daughter in a Louisiana town known for swamp tours and charter fishing. Born in Taiwan, son-in-law of a senior military officer there, he was an unlikely spy for China if ever there was one.

And yet his journey from entrepreneur to secret operative - one of dozens convicted in the last three years of efforts to pass secrets or restricted technology to the Chinese - is, in many ways, emblematic of the way China conducts espionage in the 21st century, experts say.

It is rooted in opportunity, nurtured by perseverance, sustained by greed. It relies on "guanxi" - a you-scratch-my-back, I'll-scratch-yours notion of developing close relationships.

The Chinese took advantage of all of these things to cultivate Kuo, and then the man with the winning personality went to work on their behalf. In the end, Kuo would convince two U.S. government employees to give him secret information, which he then conveyed to an official with the communist nation.

His networking skill would make Kuo wealthy, a shining immigrant success story, but it would also make him a convicted felon - a man denounced by a bitter ex-friend as "worse than a thief ... a traitor." [Read more:  Arrillaga/MiamiHerald/8May2011] 

How Will the Feds Crack bin Laden's Hard Drives? The seizure of Osama bin Laden's hard drives left many wondering what the US might discover - "the mother lode of intelligence", or impossible-to-crack encrypted data? It turns out that while the encryption used may be mathematically impenetrable, the human factor can provide a way in to the data, even after bin Laden's death.

One crude method is to decrypt the data would involve a "dictionary attack" - simply trying permutations of words in the dictionary in an attempt to guess the encryption password. Depending on the password's length and complexity, the process could take decades. An alternative and hopefully quicker approach is to use known facts about bin Laden and previously seized al Qaeda data to narrow down the options.

"They can take every single word off every single piece of media and use that to create a custom dictionary," says Chris Mellen, vice president of professional services at AccessData, which provides computer forensics software to the US government. The idea is that bin Laden might have used words or phrases with particular significance. " You're creating a smart dictionary attack versus a dumb dictionary attack." There is also the possibility that bin Laden used a similar password in a system with lower security. Finding those increases the power of the custom dictionary.

These methods will be among the first used to try and crack bin Laden's drives, and Mellen says they can quickly deliver results. "If you're going to get it via low-hanging fruit, you'll get it within the first seven days. When you get past that, it becomes very difficult to even put a time-frame on it." [Read more:  Aron/NewScientist/7May2011]

China's Spying Seeks Secret US Info. He had been a seemingly all-American, clean-cut guy: No criminal record. Engaged to be married. A job teaching English overseas. In letters to the judge, loved ones described the 29-year-old Midwesterner as honest and caring - a good citizen. His fiancée called him "Mr. Patriot."

Such descriptions make the one that culminated in the courtroom all the more baffling: Glenn Shriver was also a spy recruit for China. He took $70,000 from individuals he knew to be Chinese intelligence officers to try to land a job with a U.S. government agency - first the State Department and later the CIA.

And Shriver is just one of at least 57 defendants in federal prosecutions since 2008 charging espionage conspiracies with China or efforts to pass classified information, sensitive technology or trade secrets to intelligence operatives, state-sponsored entities, private individuals or businesses in China, according to an Associated Press review of U.S. Justice Department cases.

Of those, nine are awaiting trial, and two are considered fugitives. The other defendants have been convicted, though some are yet to be sentenced.

Most of these prosecutions have received little public attention - especially compared with the headline splash that followed last summer's arrest of 10 Russian "sleeper agents" who'd been living in suburban America for more than a decade but, according to Attorney General Eric Holder, passed no secrets.

Contrast that with this snapshot:

- In Honolulu, a former B-2 bomber engineer and one-time professor at Purdue gets 32 years in prison for working with the Chinese to develop a vital part for a cruise missile in a case that a high-ranking Justice Department official said resulted in the leak of "some of our country's most sensitive weapons-related designs."

- In Boston, a Harvard-educated businessman is sent to prison, along with his ex-wife, for conspiring for a decade to illegally export parts used in military radar and electronic warfare systems to research institutes that manufacture items for the Chinese military. The Department of Defense concluded the illegal exports "represented a serious threat to U.S. national and regional defense security interests."

- In Los Angeles, a man goes to jail for selling Raytheon-manufactured thermal imaging cameras to a buyer in Shanghai whose company develops infrared technology. The cameras are supposed to be restricted for export to China because of "their potential use in a wide variety of military and civilian applications," according to court documents.

- And in Alexandra, Va., there is Shriver, who told the judge quite simply: "Somewhere along the way, I climbed into bed with the wrong people."

All five of these defendants were sentenced over just an 11-day span earlier this year.

In Shriver's case, when once he asked his Chinese handlers - "What, exactly, do you guys want?" - the response, as detailed in court documents, was straightforward.

"If it's possible," they told him, "we want you to get us some secrets or classified information." [Read more: Arrillaga/AP/6May2011]


Section III - COMMENTARY

Four Tasks for Petraeus to Fix the CIA. Appointing Gen. David Petraeus to be Director of the Central Intelligence Agency might make good politics for Obama - bottling Petraeus up in a strictly non-partisan position - and may or may not be a good move for Petraeus, depending on his future ambitions. My interest is more prosaic: would the move be good for the CIA?

Possibly. Petraeus is not just smart: he is capable of challenging groupthink, which is exactly what the CIA needs. If Petraeus is ready to rewrite the book on intelligence the way he did, not just for counterinsurgency doctrine, but for the Army's culture as a whole, he could do wonders for the CIA. But if Petraeus lets himself go native or surrounds himself by the intelligence establishment, he'll just keep the chair warm for the next Director.

Let me say right off that I do not think the intelligence community is hopelessly broken, it does provide an irreplaceable service to policymakers and I have the highest respect for the folks I worked with during seven years at the CIA. But I do not think the taxpayers are getting the most bang for their buck. Here are a few things Petraeus should tackle.

Get the analysts out of the shadows.

The Directorate of Intelligence (DI) has the capability of being a leading foreign affairs think tank in the world. Instead, it has largely limited itself to being a massive, overpriced, secretive magazine staff for a readership of one, pouring most of its resources in to the President's Daily Brief (PDB). Analysts live under a maze of restrictions that bar them from public activities, ostensibly to protect their objectivity and credibility. The restrictions are silly. Instead of enhancing their credibility, the restrictions just isolate them and make contact with other experts in their field difficult, awkward, and sporadic.

Analysts can and should be open and regular participants in the world of academia, think tanks, and conferences, encouraged to publish and speak on their areas of expertise. Their writing may actually have a larger impact if they focus less on the PDB and more on the broader foreign policy establishment, which is where policy is shaped in broad outline before it makes it to the President. Petraeus might even experiment with having the DI publish a regular, unclassified product. It's not like we keep our classified documents secret anyway. [Read more:  ForeignPolicy/5May2011] 

The SEAL Sensibility. At Camp Pendleton in California, where I did my initial weapons training, we must have fired thousands of rounds at practice-range targets printed with the likeness of Osama bin Laden. To take the real shot, the one that brought down bin Laden, was the dream of every Navy SEAL.

The man who got that chance in Pakistan last weekend was a member of the SEAL community's most elite unit. He and the others who descended on bin Laden's lair would have put in relentless practice for weeks beforehand - assaulting mock compounds, discussing contingencies and planning every detail of the operation. Most of the men on that mission had dedicated the past decade of their lives to this fight, and they - and their families - had made great personal sacrifices.

Turning on my cellphone last Sunday, I got a text message with the incredible news: "OBL is dead. Hoo Yah!" Within minutes, a tidal wave of messages followed from fellow Navy SEALs and other military and nonmilitary friends. My own thoughts went back to James Suh and Matt Axelson ("Axe"), two members of my own SEAL training class. When Axe was pinned down by the Taliban in a firefight in Afghanistan in June 2005, Suh boarded a helicopter to fly in for a rescue mission. The helicopter was shot down that day and both men died. I thought to myself: Axe, Suh, they got him.

The men who conducted the assault on bin Laden's compound are part of a proud tradition of service that traces its roots back to the Underwater Demolition Teams that cleared the beaches at Normandy. The SEAL teams themselves were born on Jan. 1, 1962, when President John F. Kennedy commissioned a new force of elite commandos that could operate from the sea, air and land (hence the acronym, SEALs). Though SEALs remain the nation's elite maritime special operations force, part of what Kennedy wanted and needed from them - and what the nation still asks of SEALs - is that they be a flexible force, capable of operating in any environment.

To be able to undertake such missions, SEALs undergo intense training and practice. As some of my SEAL instructors would say, "The more you sweat in training, the less you bleed in war." [Read more:  Greitens/WSJ/9May2011] 

We Need the CIA and Special Ops 'On That Wall.' He was the man who forced us to walk barefoot through X-ray machines and body scanners and to endure groping by TSA agents. He was responsible for, in the words of President Obama, the horrible "images (of 9/11) seared into our national memory" and the "gaping hole in the fabric of our country."

And, now, thanks to the Joint Special Operations Command, the CIA, and the Navy SEALs, that man, Osama bin Laden, is dead and his body has been buried at sea.

The events of the past few months are a ringing vindication of our covert national security apparatus, which has been restructured and rejuvenated in the wake of Sept. 11.

To be sure, our nation walks a delicate high wire in the intelligence business, balancing national security "need to know" urgency against pesky constitutional protections and individual liberties. The world of "dirty little secrets," covert infiltration, termination "with extreme prejudice," and so on, isn't pretty. The CIA and Special Forces are trained to do the jobs most of us will never know much about. But we need a robust, fully operational CIA and special ops force more today than ever before. [Read more:  Skoning/PalmBeachPost/6May2011]

Raid Shows Blurring of Old Military and Intelligence Roles: Who's a Soldier and Who's a Spy? Has anyone noticed that CIA Director Leon Panetta has said a lot more about the Navy commandos' killing of Osama bin Laden than has the Pentagon chief, who, after all, is second in the military chain of command behind President Barack Obama?

The reason Defense Secretary Robert Gates has said exactly nothing about the raid is that the CIA, not the Pentagon, ran the operation.

That fact speaks volumes about the government's rarely noticed post-9/11 melding of military might with intelligence craft.

It's gotten a lot harder lately to distinguish between soldier and spy. The blending of the two missions can blur the definition of an act of war, raise questions about oversight and accountability, and create a clash of military and intelligence cultures.

The CIA helps gather information on military targets such as bin Laden. It also runs its own shadowy commando force and flies its own killer drones under written presidential authority. The military gathers information to be exploited by the CIA, such as the trove of computer drives and similar material the Navy SEALs scooped up in bin Laden's Pakistani safe house.

Top military leaders, including the current Afghanistan war commander, Gen. David Petraeus, believe that blending the traditional roles of the armed services and intelligence agencies is key to future success in defeating al-Qaida.

Petraeus was named last week as the next CIA chief. Panetta, meanwhile, will take over from Gates as Pentagon boss.

Yet it has taken billions of dollars, bureaucratic makeovers, and trial and error in Iraq, Afghanistan, Pakistan and elsewhere, to get to the point where a president could score arguably the most dramatic counterterror victory in U.S. history.

It is not uncommon for the elite of the elite among the military's special operations forces - top-drawer "special mission units" such as the Navy's SEAL Team Six and the Army's Delta Force - to be assigned to covert operations under CIA control. But rarely is it acknowledged so publicly as in the case of Monday's helicopter-borne raid on bin Laden's secret lair.
[Read more: AP/4May2011] 


Section IV - BOOKS AND COMING EVENTS


Books

Former CIA Clandestine Chief in Memoir to Explain Why Interrogation Videos Destroyed. Jose Rodriguez, the former director of the CIA's National Clandestine Service who landed in controversy over ordering the destruction of videotapes of terrorism suspects being interrogated, is writing a book in which he will explain why for the first time.

Rodriguez is unabashed that enhanced interrogation techniques used on top al Qaeda operatives produced information that ultimately led to Osama bin Laden, who was killed by U.S. forces last weekend.

"The actions we took in the aftermath of 9/11 were harsh but necessary and effective. These steps were fully sanctioned and carefully followed. The detention and interrogation of top terrorists like Abu Zubaydah, Khalid Sheikh Muhammed and Abu Faraj al-Libbi yielded breakthroughs which have kept this country safe," Rodriguez said in a press release.

The Justice Department decided last year that no CIA personnel would face criminal charges for the 2005 destruction of hundreds of hours of videotapes of harsh interrogations of terrorism suspects Abu Zubaydah and Abd al-Rahim al-Nashiri. Zubaydah was subjected to waterboarding and it was believed that the tapes included footage of that.

"Hard Measures" is scheduled for release in spring 2012 and is to be co-authored by former CIA spokesman Bill Harlow, who also co-authored former CIA Director George Tenet's book. [Read more:  Reuters/5May2011] 

The Secrets of the FBI. The Secrets of the FBI by New York Times bestselling author Ronald Kessler reveals the FBI's most closely guarded secrets and the secrets of celebrities, politicians, and movie stars uncovered by agents during their investigations.

Based on inside access, the book presents revelations about the recent Russian spy swap, Marilyn Monroe's death, Vince Foster's suicide, and J. Edgar Hoover's sexual orientation. For the first time, it tells how the FBI caught spy Robert Hanssen in its midst and how the FBI breaks into homes, offices, and embassies to plant bugging devices without getting caught.

From Watergate to Waco, from congressional scandals to the Christmas Day bomber, The Secrets of the FBI presents headline-making disclosures about the most important figures and events of our time. [Read more:  Kessler/5May2011] 


Coming Educational Events

EDUCATIONAL EVENTS IN COMING TWO MONTHS....

MANY Spy Museum Events in May and June with full details are listed on the AFIO Website at www.afio.com. The titles for some of these are in detail below and online.

11 May 2011, 11:30 a.m. - Scottsdale, AZ - The AFIO Arizona Chapter features Braden Allenby on "The Challenge of Emerging Technologies, Military Ops, and National Security.

Throughout history, technological evolution and military activity have been linked. The existential challenge to society represented by warfare, combined with the immediate advantage that new technology can deliver, tends to accelerate technological innovation and diffusion. The relationships between the resulting technology systems, and social and security consequences, however, are quite complex, and understanding and managing them to enhance military advantage and long term security is a critical and underappreciated challenge. This is particularly true in the era of the so-called Five Horsemen – nanotechnology, biotechnology, robotics, information and communication technology, and applied cognitive science - when technological change is foundational, rapid and accelerating.
Braden R. Allenby is Lincoln Professor of Engineering and Ethics; professor of Civil, Environmental, and Sustainable Engineering, and of Law; Founding Chair of the Consortium for Emerging Technologies, Military Operations, and National Security; and Founding Director of the Center for Earth Systems Engineering and Management, at Arizona State University.
Location: McCormick Ranch Golf Club, 7505 McCormick Parkway, Scottsdale AZ 85268. For information call Bob Reuss at 480-544-5409 or email rreuss@cox.net.

Thursday 12 May, 2011, Noon - 2:00 pm - Washington DC - The Returned Services League of Australia, Washington Sub-Branch meets to hear S. Eugene (Gene) Poteat, LL.D on " The Polish Plane Crash in Smolensk, Russia: The KGB's latest intelligence coup, and NATO's latest intelligence disaster"

Gene Poteat is a retired senior CIA Scientific Intelligence Officer, President of the Association of Former Intelligence Officers and professor at the Institute of World Politics.  Gene worked on the U-2 and A-12 aircraft, space and naval reconnaissance systems. He managed the CIA's worldwide network of monitoring sites. He holds patents on covert communications. His CIA career included the Directorate of Science and Technology, the National Reconnaissance Office, Technical Director of the Navy's Special Programs Office and Executive Director of the Intelligence R&D Council. He served abroad in London, Scandinavia, the Middle East and Asia.
Where - Amenities Room, Embassy of Australia, 1601 Massachusetts Ave NW.
NOTE: Valid ID required.
Charge - $15.00, including buffet lunch and sodas. Alcoholic beverages- $2.00 each.
RSVP to David Ward at 202-352-8550 or via e-mail at dmward1973@gmail.com
Attire : Business casual
Parking: There is no parking at the Embassy. There is paid public parking behind and under the Airline Pilots Association (17th and Mass) and at 1500 Mass Ave NW.

Thursday, 12 May 2011, 6:30 pm - Washington, DC - "Operation Dark Heart: Spy Craft and Special Ops on the Front Lines of Afghanistan" at the International Spy Museum

In 2001, just after the 9/11 attacks, Lt. Col. Tony Shaffer, a DIA senior intelligence officer, returned to active duty for a 30 month period, during which he commanded a DIA operating base and had two successful, undercover, combat tours to Afghanistan. During these tours he participated in the search for senior al-Qaeda leadership in Afghanistan—recruiting informants and gathering intel to lead to the capture or termination of his targets. Shaffer later wrote about his experiences in the highly controversial Operation Dark Heart. Join Shaffer to hear about his experiences in Afghanistan, his thoughts about the current situation there and his comments on the Operation Dark Heart controversy.
WHERE: International Spy Museum: 800 F St NW, Washington, DC. Gallery Place/Chinatown Metrorail Station
TICKETS: $15 per person. Register at www.spymuseum.org

Saturday, 14 May 2011, 11 a.m. - Grantham, NH -- The New England Chapter of CIRA meets to hear presentation on Border Operations by U.S. Border Patrol.

A U.S. Border Patrol Patrol Agent in Charge of the Intelligence Unit of the Swanton Sector of the U.S.-Canadian border, including New York, Vermont, and New Hampshire, will make the presentation. Event occurs at the Eastman Center. Questions to 603 863-4135.

14 May 2011 - Orange Park / Gainesville, FL - The AFIO North Florida Chapter meets at the Country Club for speaker luncheon.

Speaker TBA. To inquire or sign up, contact Quiel at qbegonia@comcast.net or 904-545-9549.

Wednesday, 18 May 2011, 6:30 pm - Washington, DC - "AREA 51: An Uncensored History of America's TOP SECRET Military Base" at the International Spy Museum

Area 51 sits inside one of the largest government-controlled land parcels in the United States, the Nevada Test and Training Range. It is the most famous military installation in the world—and the most secret. Now, Los Angeles Times Magazine journalist Annie Jacobsen, has written the first book to tell what really goes on at this top-secret location in the Nevada desert, AREA 51: An Uncensored History of America's Top Secret Military Base. Join Jacobsen for the launch of her book, which is based on recently declassified documents and eyewitness accounts from seventy-four individuals linked to the base, and for the world premiere screening of Area 51 Declassified. The show, which premieres on the National Geographic Channel on 22 May, features formerly classified footage and photos from inside Area 51 and draws on the personal testimonies of more than 50 Area 51 veterans. After the screening, Jacobsen and veterans featured in her book and the documentary will comment on the film. The evening will reveal the cutting edge science—from testing nuclear reactions to building super-secret, super-sonic jets to technically supporting the War on Terror—that happens on site. Join us as we explore the facts that are often more fantastic than fiction and decode the mysterious activities of the legendary top-secret base.
Tickets: Free! No registration required! WHERE: International Spy Museum: 800 F St NW, Washington, DC. Gallery Place/Chinatown Metrorail Station

Wednesday, 18 May 2011, 9 am – 1 pm – Ft Lauderdale, FL – The FBI Miami CI Strategic Partnership and NOVA SE Univ present Keith Melton on “Role of Covert Tech in Mumbai Attacks.”

H. Keith Melton – a renowned collector, historian, author, professor and specialist in Clandestine Devices discusses: "The rapid adoption by terrorists of commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) technologies and the Internet  oint to more devastating techno-aided attacks in the future."
Location: Nova Southeastern University Rose and Alfred Miniaci Performing Arts Center  3301 College Avenue Fort Lauderdale, FL  33314-7796
Registration/Continental Breakfast will be served from 8:00AM - 9:00AM  Carl Desantis Building/ H. Wayne Huizenga School of Business & Entrepreneurship (Miniaci Theater adjacent to the Carl Desantis Building)
RSVP by May 11th to Cassandra.joseph@ic.fbi.gov  or call 305-787-6446. Be certain to identify yourself as AFIO member.

Thursday, 19 May 2011, 11:30 am - Colorado Springs, CO - The Rocky Mountain Chapter presents Don Shannon, FBI  Supervisory Special Agent In Charge of Southern Colorado Joint Terrorism Task Force

The Rocky Mountain Chapter presents Don Shannon, FBI Supervisory Special Agent In Charge of Southern Colorado Joint Terrorism Task Force. Event will take place in the USAF Association's Eisenhower Golf Course Special Meeting Room. If you have any problems getting on to the USAF Academy Grounds, please call 719-459-5474 for assistance. Please RSVP to Tom VanWormer at robsmom@pcisys.net

Thursday, 19 May 2011, 12 noon - 1 pm - Washington, DC - "Mastermind: The Many Faces of the 9/11 Architect: Khalid Shaikh Mohammed" at the International Spy Museum

Author presentation. Khalid Shaikh Mohammed was behind many of the most heinous terrorist plots of the past twenty years, including the 1993 World Trade Center bombing, the Millennium Plots, and 9/11 itself. Today, Mohammed is at Guantanamo Bay and not talking. Investigative journalist Richard Miniter brings to life his remarkable true story, including his time living among us in the United States. Based on interviews with government officials, generals, diplomats and spies from around the world, Miniter reveals never-before-reported al Qaeda plots and remarkable new details about the 9/11 attacks. He also lets us into the ultimately successful clandestine operations of American and Pakistani intelligence officers to capture this notorious killer.
Where: International Spy Museum: 800 F St NW, Washington, DC. Gallery Place/Chinatown Metrorail Station
TICKETS: Free, no registration required

19 May 2011, 11:30 am - Arlington, VA - The Defense Intelligence Forum meets to hear David Rogus "Brazil and U.S. National Security."

David Rogus, a “retired” Senior Foreign Service Officer, has served worldwide as a naval officer and diplomat with concentrations in the Americas and Northern Europe, and specializations in counter narcotics and law enforcement.  He served as State’s Director of Brazilian and Southern Cone Affairs.  Other assignments have covered Mexico, Cuba, the Caribbean, Iceland where he was Deputy Chief of Mission, the Balkans, and NATO.   Before leaving the Navy as a Lieutenant Commander to join the diplomatic corps, he served as a line and intelligence officer in the Atlantic, Pacific and Mediterranean fleets, and ashore in Viet Nam during the war. After a stint as Lockheed Martin’s Director of Business Development for the Americas, he now heads a business development group in Washington, São Paulo, and Rio de Janeiro.  He holds degrees from Marquette University and the National War College.  Much of his work focuses on Brazil where he lived for eight years as a diplomat and naval officer, including four years with the Brazilian Navy. Dave is known to be a patron of the Garota de Ipanema bar, where the Girl from Ipanema was written, and a guy who enjoys the beaches of Rio. This forum will follow a modified Chatham House rule.  Everything except the speaker's name and subject will be off the record. The Defense Intelligence Forum is open to members of all Intelligence Community associations and their guests. Event location: Pulcinella Restaurant, 6852 Old Dominion Drive, McLean, VA. Mr.
Reserve by 12 May by email to diforum@verizon.net.  Give names, telephone numbers, email addresses, and choice of chicken cacciatore, tilapia puttanesca, lasagna, sausage with peppers, or fettuccini with portabella. Pay at the door by check for $29 per person. Make checks payable to DIAA, Inc. THE FORUM DOESN’T  TAKE CASH!  If you don’t have a check, have the restaurant charge your credit or debit card $29 and give the restaurant's copy of the receipt when you check in.

21 May 2011, 2 pm - Kennebunk, ME - RUSSIA, FRIEND OR FOE? by Natalia Novikova at the AFIO Maine Chapter meeting.

Ms. Natalia Novikova will address the current situation in Russia and the status of U.S. - Russia relations. Born and raised in Russia, Novikova will draw on personal experience and stories in speaking of the Yeltsin and Putin eras and how they have led to the current situation. Daughter of a Soviet military pilot and Soviet economist,  Novikova has an MBA from Harvard Business School and an M.S. in Applied Mathematics. She has traveled and worked on four continents. Currently a strategy consultant with Booz and Company in NYC, she lives in Manhattan with her husband Aleksey. 
     The meeting, which is open to the public, will be at 2:00 p.m. in the Program Center of the Brick Store Museum, 117 Main Street, Kennebunk. DIRECTIONS FOR PARKING behind the Museum: approaching the junction of Route 1 and Route 35 from the South turn right at the set of lights just before the Town Hall, then right into the Town Hall parking lot. Approaching the junction from the North, turn left at the light at the Unitarian Church and continue straight across the intersection onto the street to the right of the Town Hall, then right into the Town Hall parking lot. The Program Center is in the yelow building which forms one side of he parking lot. For further information contact 207-967-4298

25 - 26 May 2011 - Ft Meade, MD - The Center for Cryptologic History presents the Henry F. Schorreck Memorial Lecture series for 2011 featuring Dr. Rose Mary Sheldon.
The annual event is a series of historical lectures named in honor of the former NSA Historian. We present preeminent scholars from the social sciences who address cryptologic issues with a historical perspective. This year, Dr. Rose Mary Sheldon will speak on "The Private Side of William F. Friedman: A Scholar's View". Dr. Sheldon is Char and Professor at the Department of History at the Virginia Military Institute. She is a specialist on the ancient world and has written widely on intelligence and espionage throughout history. She also is the author of the guide to the Friedman Collection at the George C. Marshall Research Library. Dr. Sheldon will present her lecture at the National Cryptologic Museum from 1400-1600 on 25 May as well as 1100-1300 on 26 May. The sessions are open to the public, but advance registration is necessary due to limited seating capacity at the Museum. For more information or to register, contact Dr. Kent Sieg or Judy Holland by email at kgsieg@nsa.gov & jmholla@nsa.gov or call 301-688-2336.

Thursday, 26 May 2011, 6:30 pm - Washington, DC - "Spies on Screen - Norwegian Ninja" at the International Spy Museum

Norwegian diplomat Arne Treholt was arrested in 1984 and convicted of spying for the Soviet Union and Iraq. Now, the most notorious modern espionage case in Norway undergoes an incredible transformation in the film Norwegian Ninja. Writer/director Thomas Cappelen Malling reimagines Treholt's case as the tale of a Ninja entrusted by King Olav to lead a secret force of enlightened shadow warriors. Join Malling for his first state-side screening of the film the Wall Street Journal calls, "hilarious and menacing, absurd and insightful, and an accomplished work of genre film making that authoritatively upends the cold-war spy thriller." He'll reveal how he was inspired to turn Treholt into a hero and what the real spy thinks of the film.
WHERE: International Spy Museum: 800 F Street, NW Washington, DC. Gallery Place/Chinatown Metrorail Station
TICKETS: $20 per person To REGISTER: www.spymuseum.org

27 - 28 May 2011 - Rijswijk, The Netherlands - 'The Future of Intelligence; Threats, Challenges, Opportunities' by the Netherlands Intelligence Studies Association

At the conference, present and future developments in the field of intelligence and security will be discussed by an array of well-known experts in the field and other participants. There will be plenary sessions and workshops with a focus on specific intelligence,
counterintelligence and global security challenges.
Registration: Registration for the conference will close on 13 May 2011. To register or for additional information visit: http://www.nisa-intelligence.nl
Conference Fee:
Standard Fee: 150 euro; Student Fee: 65 euro (proof of status required) Fee covers registration, one dinner, two lunches and drinks.
Location: Netherlands Defence Academy, Brasserskade 227a, 2497 NX The Hague, Rijswijk.

Visit Netherlands Intelligence Studies Association (NISA)/Stichting Inlichtingenstudies Nederland
http://www.nisa-intelligence.nl

Thursday, 2 June 2011, 5:30 to 9 pm - Dayton, OH - CIA Evening Presentation on "Stories of Sacrifice and Dedication: Civil Air Transport, Air America, and the CIA"

CIA_IconThe CIA, in partnership with the National Museum of the USAF, presents an evening which pays tribute to the sacrifice and dedication of Civil Air Transport (CAT) and Air America (AAM). These special CIA proprietaries were essential for covert operations, providing search and rescue, and photo reconnaissance in east and southeast Asia from the end of WWII through the Vietnam War. The highlight of the event will be the public release of 900 recently declassified documents from CAT and AA corporate files and CIA holdings spanning 1946 to 1978.
LOCATION: At the National Museum of USAF at Wright-Patterson AFB, Dayton, OH. Craig Duehring, retired Asst Secretary of the Air Force serves as keynote speaker. Mr. Duehring served as a USAF forward air controller in South Vietnam and Laos and will share his personal story of being rescued by Air America. The focus of the event will be two specific stories that exemplify the themes of sacrifice and dedication.

THREE RSVP/REGISTRATION CHOICES....ALL FREE

1. To RSVP/register as AFIO member and Guest and receive assured seats for the June 2nd evening-only Dayton, Ohio CIA event, do so here.

2. To RSVP as a member of the general public. The event is free and open to the public. No tickets are necessary but seating will be limited to the first 1,000 people. Seating will open at 4:30 p.m. on a first-come, first served basis. Those planning to attend are asked to RSVP by May 31 at http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/CIA2011 or call (937) 255-1670. Refreshments will also be available for purchase throughout the evening. More information from the USAF Museum is here: http://tinyurl.com/3w7o39c

3. To Register for this event PLUS Air America Assn programs before and after June 2, follow the instructions in this PDF from the Air America Assn website:
http://www.air-america.org/Reunion/2011/2011reunionregistration.pdf

2 June 2011 - San Francisco, CA - The AFIO Jim Quesada Chapter hosts Craig Fair, Acting Section Chief, FBI Counterintelligence Division at Headquarters.

The topic will be on Russian Foreign Intelligence Service's Illegals Network and Investgiation in the U.S. The meeting will be held at UICC, 2700 45th Avenue, San Francisco (between Sloat/Wawona): 11:30AM no host cocktails; noon - luncheon. $25 member rate with advance reservation and payment; $35 non-member/no reservation. E-mail RSVP to Mariko Kawaguchi (please indicate meat or fish) at afiosf@aol.com and mail a check made out to "AFIO" to: Mariko Kawaguchi, P.O. Box 117578, Burlingame, CA 94011.

Friday, 3 June 2011, 10:30 am - 2 pm - McLean, VA - David Wise discusses Chinese Espionage; Douglas Waller describes the early years of the OSS and Wild Bill Donovan at the AFIO National Spring/Summer Luncheon

Morning speaker is author Douglas Waller on "WILD BILL DONOVAN: The Spymaster Who Created the OSS and Modern American Espionage." Our afternoon speaker is David Wise on what will be his first release of "TIGER TRAP: America's Secret Spy War With China." Register here.

Tuesday, 21 June 2011, 7 - 9pm - Washington, DC - "Deception and Spycraft: Military Intelligence in the Civil War" - Spy Seminar Series on Civil War Spies at the International Spy Museum

Spy Seminar Series: Civil War Spies - A Three-Part Exploration of Union and Confederate Intelligence Operations.
The North and the South both had their share of intelligence successes (and failures); neither the Blue nor the Gray were strangers to intrigue and espionage. Society ladies carried secret messages, runaway slaves re-crossed the Mason-Dixon Line as undercover agents, and couriers worked covert operations in the life or death climate of wartime. In this series, a distinguished group of historians and espionage experts will introduce you to some of the most amazing spies and spy cases of the conflict.
Spy Museum historian Mark Stout; Professor William B. Feis, of Buena Vista University, author of Grant's Secret Service: The Intelligence War from Belmont to Appomattox; and James A. Davis, Professor of Musicology at State University of New York—Fredonia, for a fascinating discussion of intelligence in America's bloodiest war.
International Spy Museum: 800 F Street, NW Washington, DC. Gallery Place/Chinatown Metrorail Station
Tickets: Series Tickets: $60; Individual Tickets: $25
Register at: www.spymuseum.org

22 June 2011 - San Diego, CA - The AFIO San Diego Chapter hosts San Diego District Attorney, Bonnie Dumanis (and candidate for Mayor) as our guest speaker

To Register or for more information email Darryl at DRT1083@aol.com

Thursday, 23 June 2011, 6:30 pm - Washington, DC - "David Wise on America's Secret Spy War with China" at the International Spy Museum

Join renowned intelligence author David Wise as he reveals the full story of China's many victories and defeats in its ongoing espionage war with America. To write his new book Tiger Trap: America's Secret Spy War with China, Wise interviewed key insiders in the FBI and CIA as well as Chinese agents and people close to them to gather the unvarnished stories of Chinese espionage. Wise will share the honey traps, double agents, and mind-blowing objectives of the rapidly emerging Asian superpower.
International Spy Museum: 800 F Street, NW Washington, DC. Gallery Place/Chinatown Metrorail Station
TICKETS: $12.50 per person. Register at www.spymuseum.org

Saturday, 25 June 2011 - Salem, MA - The AFIO New England Chapter holds their quarterly meeting.

Hold the date. Gen David McKiernan, former coalition commander in Afghanistan, has agreed to be our June meeting's main speaker.

Locale: the Salem Waterfront Hotel located in Salem MA. The hotel web site is here: http://www.salemwaterfronthotel.com/. For directions to the hotel look here: http://www.salemwaterfronthotel.com/location.html
Information about Salem MA and local hotels can be found here: http://salem.org/
The schedule is: Registration & gathering, 1000 – 1130; Membership meeting 1130 – 1200; Luncheon at 1200 followed by our speaker, with adjournment at 2:30PM.
Questions, comments, etc. to afionechapter@gmail.com

Tuesday, 28 June 2011, 7 - 10 pm - Washington, DC - "Dinner With A Spy" - Jim Woolsey at the International Spy Museum

Former U.S. Director of Central Intelligence (DCI) R. James Woolsey headed the CIA and intelligence community at a time of great change and challenge. Woolsey was appointed by President Clinton in 1993 to serve as DCI. During this intimate dinner, Woolsey will share what it was like to serve as DCI during that tumultuous time: the Cold War was ending and the Agency was suffering from the recent revelation that intelligence officer Aldrich Ames had been a Soviet mole inside the Agency. Come participate in this lively exchange hosted by CIA veteran and International Spy Museum executive director Peter Earnest, who served as DCI Woolsey's spokesman.
WHERE: International Spy Museum: 800 F Street, NW Washington, DC. Gallery Place/Chinatown Metrorail Station
Price: $200 per person
Register at www.spymuseum.org

11 - 13 July 2011 - Dungarvan, IRELAND. 2nd Annual Global Intelligence Forum by Mercyhurst College's Institute for Intelligence Studies
Last July in Dungarvan, Ireland the Mercyhurst College Institute for Intelligence Studies (MCIIS) hosted this event which explored the nature of analysis and its application in various disciplines, including law enforcement, national security and competitive intelligence, building bridges between analytic practitioners and scholars within those disciplines, and exploring best practices in terms of teaching analytic methodologies. Takeaways for attendees were a deeper and broader appreciation of the value of different analytic methods, which can be borrowed as ―best practices from other disciplines, as well as instruction on the application. Attended by 180 people from 17 countries the forum was very well received.
This year's July 11-13 forum theme will be the relationship between intelligence and the decision-maker and we've gathered an outstanding group of international speakers and panelists (http://globalintelligenceforum.com). In addition we will be offering two proven training courses following the forum one designed for decision-makers in various disciplines and the other for analysts .
Five or more AFIO members that attend will be given a 10% discount on registration. It's a wonderful excuse for a July vacation in Ireland and Dungarvan is a perfect venue (www.dungarvan.com).

Tuesday, 19 July 2011, 7 - 9pm - Washington, DC - "The Lincoln Assassination Conspiracies " - Spy Seminar Series on Civil War Spies at the International Spy Museum

Spy Seminar Series: Civil War Spies - A Three-Part Exploration of Union and Confederate Intelligence Operations.
The North and the South both had their share of intelligence successes (and failures); neither the Blue nor the Gray were strangers to intrigue and espionage. Society ladies carried secret messages, runaway slaves re-crossed the Mason-Dixon Line as undercover agents, and couriers worked covert operations in the life or death climate of wartime. In this series, a distinguished group of historians and espionage experts will introduce you to some of the most amazing spies and spy cases of the conflict.
Location: Ford's Theatre - Join renowned experts Michael Kauffman, author of American Brutus; Frank J. Williams, Chairman of The Lincoln Forum and Chief Justice (ret) of Rhode Island; and H. Donald Winkler, author of Stealing Secrets and Lincoln and Booth: More Light on the Conspiracy; for a rounded view of the conspiracies and realities of the horrific events of April 14th, 1865.
International Spy Museum: 800 F Street, NW Washington, DC. Gallery Place/Chinatown Metrorail Station
Tickets: Series Tickets: $60; Individual Tickets: $25
Register at: www.spymuseum.org

24 - 26 August 2011 - Raleigh, NC - "Spies Among Us - The Secret World of Illegals" - theme of the 7th Raleigh Spy Conference

Special guests/speakers: Michael Hayden, former DCIA and DIRNSA; Michael Sulick, former Director of the National Clandestine Service, CiA
Returning presenters:
Brian Kelley
, CIA & Professor at Institute of World Politics;
Nigel West - world-famous intelligence author/speaker - former Member of Parliament;
Dan Mulvenna - RCMP/CASIS
Writer's Roundtable to feature Douglas Waller, author of Wild Bill Donovan, founder of The OSS; Kent Clizbe, author of Willing Accomplices [forthcoming], and other noted writers in the field.

For more information: www.raleighspyconference.com
email: cyndi@metromagazine.com
Location: North Carolina Museum of History, Downtown Raleigh, NC


For Additional Events two+ months or greater....view our online Calendar of Events

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