AFIO Weekly Intelligence Notes #41-11 dated 25 October 2011

[Editors' Note: The WIN editors attempt to include a wide range of articles and commentary in the Weekly Notes to inform and educate our readers. However, the views expressed in the articles are purely those of the authors, and in no way reflect support or endorsement from the WIN editors or the AFIO officers and staff. We welcome comments from the WIN readers on any and all articles and commentary.]
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CONTENTS

Section I - INTELLIGENCE HIGHLIGHTS

Section II - CONTEXT & PRECEDENCE

Section III - COMMENTARY

Section IV -   Obituaries, Books, Research Requests and Coming Events

Obituaries

Books

Research Requests

Coming Educational Events

Current Calendar New and/or Next Two Months ONLY

 

Note:  There will be no WIN next week, 1 November 2011.  We will resume the following week on November 8th.


AFIO Symposia in 2011

AFIO will not be hosting the regular annual Symposium this year, but instead has co-hosted or supported special CIA Conferences in a number of cities. This has permitted us to meet with members in several major cities rather than just in Washington, DC. AFIO members receive special seating and access at these events, and at most of them a special post-event reception for AFIO members occurs. Last month almost 800 attended the event at the JFK Library in Boston.

In August, AFIO co-sponsored the annual popular Raleigh Spy Conference in Raleigh, NC on the theme of "illegals." Almost 300 attended.

Later this week is a CIA/National Archives event on the Berlin Wall.
In early November, AFIO is at the Reagan Library as CIA and the Library present the final program for the year on Reagan and Intelligence and the End of the Cold War [details below]. More than 1,000 people have signed up for this event in Simi Valley, CA. A special reception for AFIO Members and their guests is part of the program, including preferential seating for the program. We hope members in the region who have not signed up will do so.

A regular AFIO symposium, to be held at an agency in Virginia, is in the planning for April 2012.


AFIO Winter Luncheon - Registration Open - Space limited

John D. Bennett

Director, National Clandestine Service, CIA

and

J. M. Berger

Author of Jihad Joe: Americans Who Go To War in the Name of Islam

Thursday, 8 December 2011
10:30 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Crowne Plaza, Tysons Corner, VA

Register here.


Two Upcoming CIA Historic Document Release Events - Reagan Library Event Includes special reception for AFIO attendees

The Berlin Crisis of 1961 "Building the Wall, From Vienna to Checkpoint Charlie"

Thursday October 27, 2011, 9:00am to 12:00pm

Location: McGowan Theater, National Archives Building, Washington DC

The National Declassification Center at the National Archives, in partnership with the Historical Review Program of the CIA, will be a hosting a one-day conference to mark the anniversary of the Berlin Crisis of 1961. October 27th, 2011 is the 50th anniversary of the American/Soviet showdown at Checkpoint Charlie. At the McGowan theater at the Archives building in downtown Washington, D.C. a panel of distinguished historians will present topics such as "How the East German Leadership Persuaded the Reluctant Soviets to Build the Berlin Wall", "Events and Decisions Leading Up to the Building of the Berlin Wall - The East German Perspective" and "The U.S. Military Response to the 1960-62 Berlin Crisis." The last person to cross the Potsdamer Platz in a car as the Wall was being erected, Dr. William R. Smyser, will be sharing his personal recollections of the Crisis.

A publication of newly released declassified documents will accompany the event. Documents include intelligence reports, U.S. Army and NATO contingency plans, memoranda, photographs and maps of the earliest stages of the Berlin Wall, and a contemporary 600-page State Department analysis covering the situation in Berlin from 1958-1962.

Scheduled Speakers:

Archivist of the United States, David Ferriero
Director, Information Management Services, CIA- Joseph Lambert
Adjunct Professor BMW Center for German and European Studies at Georgetown University in Washington - Dr. William R. Smyser
Central Intelligence Agency, Dr. Donald P. Steury
US Army Center of Military History- Dr. Don Carter
Supreme Headquarters Allied Powers Europe (SHAPE) - Dr. Gregg Pedlow
Associate Professor of History and International Affairs at George Washington University - Dr. Hope Harrison
Central Intelligence Agency - Mr. Lou Mehrer

Reservations

For seat reservations, please send an e-mail to berlin.1961crisis@nara.gov that includes: your name; e-mail address; phone number; number of seats desired (limit 2 per name).

For more information: email berlin.1961crisis@nara.gov

More information can be found at....

http://www.archives.gov/research/foreign-policy/cold-war/1961-berlin-crisis/2011-conference.html


Reagan, Intelligence, and the End of the Cold War

November 2, 2011

Location: Ronald Reagan Presidential Foundation & Library, Simi Valley, California

Time: 12:30 - 5:30 p.m. Includes special reception for AFIO Attendees and their Guests.

By CIA Historical Collections Division

Reagan, Intelligence, and the End of the Cold War
Wednesday, 02 November 2011 12:30 - 5:30 PM - Simi Valley, CA - CIA Document Release Event at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Foundation & Library, Simi Valley, California

Ronald Reagan, Intelligence, and the End of the Cold War will feature high-level former policymakers, intelligence practitioners, and analysts discussing how the Reagan Administration used intelligence in making policies to end the Cold War. The CIA is releasing a collection of more than 200 declassified documents, including intelligence assessments, high-level memos, and briefing materials provided to the Administration during this period. Also included are never-before-seen video briefings prepared by the CIA’s Directorate of Intelligence and delivered to policymakers on such varied topics as the Soviet space program, the Andropov succession, the Chernobyl disaster, and the Moscow summit. This event is free to attend, however reservations are required.

Featured guest speakers include Kenneth Adelman, Former Director, Arms Control and Disarmament Agency and Oleg Kalugin, Former Major General in the Soviet KGB.

Panelists include: Peter Clement, CIA Deputy Director for Intelligence for Analytic Programs; Douglas MacEachin, Former CIA Deputy Director of Intelligence; Admiral Bobby Inman, Former CIA Deputy Director; Martin Anderson, Former Advisor to President Reagan; Gregory Treverton, Director, RAND Center for Global Risk and Security; David Holloway, Stanford University; Mary Sarotte, University of Southern California; Bruce D. Berkowitz, Author; Dr. Nicholas Dujmovic, CIA Historian; and David Lodge, CIA Analyst.

Location: The Ronald Reagan Presidential Foundation & Library, 40 Presidential Dr, Simi Valley, CA 93065

Click here to make reservations. For more information, please call 805-577-4141 or visit this link.

 

Section I - INTELLIGENCE HIGHLIGHTS

Trial of ex-CIA Officer Delayed. The trial of an ex-CIA officer accused of leaking classified information to a reporter was postponed in a dispute over a judge's decision to bar two witnesses.

Prosecutors said they would appeal U.S. District Judge Leonie M. Brinkema's decision to strike two witnesses from the trial of Jeffrey Sterling, arrested in January on a 10-count indictment, The Washington Post reported.

The trial was to have begun Monday. CNN said no date has been set for the trial pending appeal.

The recipient of the leaked information wasn't named in the indictment, but later was identified by former intelligence officials as New York Times reporter James Risen, the Post said. [Read more:  UPI/18October2011] 

Egypt, Israel Close to Swap of Alleged Spy for Prisoners. The Egyptian foreign ministry has been charged with overseeing the exchange of an Israeli-American alleged spy being held in Egypt for Egyptian prisoners in Israel, the official Mena news agency reported late Thursday.

The foreign ministry will be responsible "for overseeing the exchange of spy Ilan Grapel for Egyptian prisoners, and to take all legal measures to this effect," the agency said.

The decision was made during a meeting of the cabinet of Egyptian Prime Minister Essam Sharaf.

Grapel, who has been in custody since June 12, is accused of being an agent of Israel's Mossad intelligence agency and of sowing sectarian strife and chaos in Egypt during the uprising which ousted president Hosni Mubarak in February.

Israel has strongly denied the claims, insisting the whole thing was a mistake and accusing Egyptian authorities of "bizarre behaviour." [Read more:  AFP/21October2011] 

Iran Spy Chief Mocks ‘Stupidity’ of US Plot Claims. Iran's spy chief Thursday mocked US claims of a Tehran-sponsored assassination plot, saying the accusation reeked of "stupidity" and detailed incredibly unprofessional tradecraft, the website of state-run television reported.

Intelligence Minister Heydar Moslehi, who heads up Iran's espionage organizations, said the US allegations - involving an Iranian-American used car salesman trying to contract Mexican gangsters to kill the Saudi ambassador to Washington - were "too cheap to believe."

His point-by-point rebuttal of the US claims added to strenuous denials from other Iranian officials that Tehran had anything to do with the alleged plot.

"When you look at it from an intelligence standpoint, there are too many contradictions to believe that a government such as the United States could compile such a cheap claim and expect to it to be credible," he said. [Read more:  Pouladi/AFP/21October2011] 

Guatemala Apologizes to Arbenz Family for 1954 Coup. Guatemala's government has apologized to the family of former President Jacobo Arbenz who was toppled in 1954 in a CIA-backed coup.

Arbenz, who died in exile in Mexico in 1971, made land reform a centerpiece of his government's policies.

His overthrow came at the height of the Cold War as Washington sought to counter what it saw as the Soviet threat in Latin America.

The years following the coup saw Guatemala descend into civil war.

At a ceremony in Guatemala City, President Alvaro Colom formally apologized for the events of 57 years ago.

The move follows an accord reached in May between the family and the government by the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights.

Under the settlement, the government recognizes that the Guatemalan State failed to protect the human rights of members of the Arbenz family.

"Asking forgiveness has historical implications for the country and for Guatemalans' historical memory because (the coup) was when our country's debacle began," Ruth del Valle, head of the presidential commission on human rights told AFP. [Read more:  BBC/21October2011] 

Suspected Russian Husband-Wife Spy Team Detained in Germany. Special Forces in Germany have detained an alleged Russian husband-wife spy team in the cities of Marburg and Balingen, Deutsche Welle reported on Saturday.

The married couple, who have not been named by authorities, are suspected of working for the Russian Foreign Intelligence Service (SVR). The couple, who according to their documents are from Latin America but have Austrian passports, has denied the accusations, Deutsche Welle said.

According to the news agency, the woman was detained when she was "receiving a coded radio message."

The husband was apparently born in Argentina and his wife in Peru; however, German Special Forces during investigations were unable to prove their true birthplaces. The couple is alleged to have been spying in Germany for more than 20 years, Der Spiegel magazine reported.

The couple caught the attention of German Special Forces after the CIA uncovered a Russian spy ring in the United States last year. [Read more:  RIA/22October2011] 

Intel CIOs Finding Common Ground in Shared Services. Technology leaders in the intelligence community say the push to consolidate their IT systems is driven by budget cuts. But it's also an opportunity to turn their agencies into better intelligence gatherers.

Two days after Director of National Intelligence James Clapper announced double-digit, billion-dollar budget cuts to intelligence agencies - along with his intention to get half those savings from IT - chief information officers from across the intelligence community revealed some early details of their plan.

"The bottom line is, look, budgets are being severely cut," said Al Tarasiuk, ODNI's CIO. "Agencies are not going to have the kind of dollars they've had in the past to run the type of IT to enable missions the way they have in the past. We have to move to a new model. That's the huge driver in this, but we obviously want to propose an architecture that makes sense and works for us, and take the opportunity to do it right." 

The "big five" intelligence agencies: CIA, the Defense Intelligence Agency, the National Reconnaissance Office and the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency and the National Security Agency, will lead the strategy. A month ago, they briefed their leadership on a plan to develop a common IT infrastructure across the intelligence community and create shared enterprise services in a cloud architecture. A full implementation plan is due by December. [Read more: Serbu/FederalNewsRadio/21October2011]

Secret CIA/FBI Files of NUMEC Nuclear Diversions to Israel Could Aid $170 Million Toxic Cleanup. Recently declassified wiretap transcripts of conversations between Nuclear Materials and Equipment Corporation (NUMEC) founder Zalman Shapiro and venture capitalist David Lowenthal reveal that illegal storage practices led to a dangerous nuclear spill. Obtained under the Freedom of Information Act by IRmep's Center for Policy and Law Enforcement, the files were heavily censored by the Central Intelligence Agency which blocked release of 225 pages.

The transcript, http://www.irmep.org/ila/numec/08292011lowenthal.pdf , details that Shapiro and Lowenthal's interest in completing NUMEC's sale to Atlantic Richfield Company outweighed public safety concerns. The FBI and CIA investigated Shapiro and Lowenthal in the 1960s under suspicion of diverting highly enriched uranium (HEU) from NUMEC into the clandestine Israeli nuclear weapons program. For decades the CIA has blocked release of its files and equity content in other government agency reports about NUMEC.

This week the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) $170 million cleanup of NUMEC's toxic waste dump had to be halted after contractors experienced unanticipated difficulties handling 55-gallon radioactive waste drums. The declassified 1969 transcript identifies 200 stainless steel drums illegally stored by NUMEC were improperly treated with fluoride which accelerated corrosion. Full public release of remaining secret CIA and FBI files could help determine the precise location of the barrels and allow USACE to forecast likely migration of toxic waste through groundwater and abandoned underground coal mine shafts. [Read more: BusinessWire/20October2011]

FBI Investigating Offer of Reward for Killing Obama. The Federal Bureau of Investigation has opened an investigation into messages posted online offering rewards for the murder of President Obama and his family as well as former President George W. Bush, members of the Bush administration and specific members of Congress, an FBI spokesperson told CBS News. No one has yet been arrested.

The New York Times first reported that the FBI and Capitol Police were investigating the messages, in which "a Google user offered up to $100,000" for the killings. The user also reportedly called for bombing of iconic monuments, bridges and buildings, including the Washington Monument, the Brooklyn Bridge, American embassies and the headquarters of defense contractors. He or she urged Americans to set the bombs and "KILL as many FBI, CIA, DNI and NSA PSYCHOPATHS as possible," the Times reported. [Read more: Montopoli/CBSNews/20October2011]

NRO Changes Architectures to Speed Data to Warfighters. Although budgets are being reduced, the National Reconnaissance Office is still managing a number of satellite launches while changing its architectures so data can be more readily accessed by soldiers in the field. The agency is also moving towards more open architectures, which will be less expensive to administer than the separately managed, "stovepiped" programs of years past.

NRO, like many related agencies, is making dramatic revisions to its operations as the DOD asks service providers to make more data available to troops who are on the tactical edge of the battlefield. During a speech at the GEOINT 2011 Symposium in San Antonio, Texas, NRO Director Bruce Carlson told a standing-room-only crowd that the biggest benefits from geospatial intelligence comes when it's delivered to those who need it immediately.

They don't need precise information; it's better to quickly know that something's around the corner than to get more precise information at a later time, he said. However, soldiers at the so-called tip of the spear still have only limited access to this data.

"Ninety-five percent of our GEOINT data and 90 percent of the signal intelligence produced for NSA are classified at levels that are easy to distribute in the field, it's not top secret. But only 5 percent of the soldiers in the field have access to it," Carlson said. [Read more: Costlow/DefenseSystems/17October2011]

Musa Kusa Traced to Qatar Resort. Libya's former foreign minister has been traced to a luxury resort in Qatar, according to reports.

Musa Kusa is believed to have been an intelligence officer at the time of the 1988 Lockerbie bomb atrocity in which 270 people were killed.

He made a high-profile defection to Britain in March and was interviewed by police and Scottish prosecutors investigating the bombing.

He left the country following an EU decision to lift sanctions against him, meaning he no longer faces travel restrictions or an asset freeze.

Kusa was traced by the BBC's Panorama programme, which is investigating allegations that he tortured political prisoners in Libya.

He declined to comment on the claims.

Kusa was head of Colonel Muammar Gaddafi's intelligence agency from 1994 and a senior intelligence agent when PanAm flight 103 was blown up over Lockerbie. [Read more: UKPA/23October2011]

Building a Cyber Intelligence Team: New Infosec Discipline Requires Multidisciplinary Skills. The budding discipline of cyber intelligence, a new approach to analyze situational awareness and provide warnings of cyberthreats, requires multidisciplinary skills to succeed, says the editor of a new report about the nascent field.

Terry Roberts, chair of the Intelligence and National Security Alliance's Cyber Council, says lessons on how to build a cyber intelligence team can be learned from an earlier generation. "In the beginning nuclear age, you brought in people with the technical body of knowledge, then your brought people with a body of knowledge on that particular adversary, the culture, the leadership, and you brought it all together so you would have a 360 view," Roberts says in an interview with Information Security Media Group's Eric Chabrow (transcript below).

"We haven't been doing that in the cyber realm," says Roberts, who edited the alliance's paper, Cyber Intelligence: Setting the Landscape for an Emerging Discipline (see Cyber Intelligence: What Exactly Is It?). "Many non-tech folks say, 'Eh, cyber, it's technical, I have nothing to do with it.' When actually, in cyber intelligence, you need analytical kinds of folks, you need people who understand the network environment who have an operational background. ... The beauty is, it's a lot of the skill sets we have, but it's really more about the approach of how do you integrate those skill sets into an end-to-end process." [Read more: Roman/GovInfoSecurity/25October2011]


Section II - CONTEXT & PRECEDENCE

Spooks Under Fire. At a time when most of Russia's security community - the Federal Security Service (FSB), the Foreign Intelligence Service (SVR), the Federal Protection Service (FSO) and all the rest of the acronyms - have seen their budgets and powers grow, the GRU has just been through a savage round of cuts.

In the past two years, it has lost over 1,000 officers, some sacked, some retired, others transferred out of their cushy Moscow billets to regular army commands across the country. The GRU's generals have faced a particular cull: of 100 or so who used to serve, only about 20 are left.

It has also lost the Spetsnaz special forces. It used to have eight commando brigades: three have been disbanded, the rest transferred again into the regular military. Most of the GRU's "residencies" - the separate intelligence offices it ran inside Russian embassies abroad - have been closed down, or reduced to a single officer working as a military attaché. Only in the neighboring countries of the 'Near Abroad' does the GRU maintain anything like its old espionage networks.

These cuts are the bitter legacy of the GRU's chief since 2009, Colonel General Alexander Shlyakhturov. His predecessor, Valentin Korabelnikov, had been an outspoken opponent of military reform. Shlyakhturov, though, seems to have cut without complaint. [Read more:  Galeotti/TheMoscowNews/20October2011] 

CIA Spied on Allied BND. American spies have been keeping tabs on their Teutonic counterparts for decades - not only the East Germans of the Cold War, but also allied West Germans, according to newly released documents.

US intelligence agencies collected highly personal information on their allies, according to a report in weekly magazine Focus on Monday.

Staff at the Central Intelligence Agency were expected to keep tabs on communist East German spies during the Cold War, but US documents show they were doing the same to their supposed friends at West Germany's Bundesnachrichtendienst (BND).

Office politics within the BND as well as details of personal factors such as alcoholism and infidelity were carefully noted, as well as health information such as which agents had suffered heart attacks, the magazine reported.

One file entry even records the wooden leg of an aristocratic West German agent.

Even after the fall of communism in 1989, the spying continued into the 1990s, with those BND agents with a Nazi past in particular attracting attention. Two former SS members were drafted into a sabotage unit of NATO, according to the papers. [Read more: TheLocal/24October2011]

Catching the Next WikiLeaker. It is like a scene out of the television show 24. An intelligence officer is surfing a top secret government file that is out of his normal work portfolio. A computer program alerts a "data analyst," who then monitors the officer's computer activity. If the officer acts like a potential leaker, sending an encrypted email or using an unregistered thumb drive, the analyst might push a button and watch a screen video of the officer's last hour of work. Once a case is made that a leak might be imminent, it is check mate: the agent is thwarted.

That is the kind of scenario Ryan Szedelo, the manager for Raytheon's SureView software, is describing this week for intelligence professionals in San Antonio shopping for new gizmos at the annual GEOINT conference. The government is already beginning to use the software and others like it in a concerted effort to clamp down on secret leaks.

"SureView is designed to capture the next Bradley Manning," Szedelo said of the Army private who uploaded hundreds of thousands of classified documents from the military's secret Internet protocol router network (SIPRnet) onto a remote server affiliated with WikiLeaks.

With his secret clearance, Manning had access not only to the raw intelligence reports in Iraq, but also to aircraft videos, analysis from the field in Afghanistan, and candid diplomatic cables from U.S. embassies all over the world.

"Had SureView been on Bradley Manning's machine, no one would know who Bradley Manning is today," Szedelo said in an interview.

SureView is a type of auditing software that specializes in "Behavior Based Internal Monitoring." It is designed to identify and catch what is known in the counterintelligence trade as the "insider threat," a trusted user who is willing to steal the secrets he or she is obliged to protect.

Until very recently, WikiLeaks had many leaders of the U.S. intelligence community willing to pull back the kind of intelligence sharing started in earnest after the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks. Last October, Director of National Intelligence James Clapper said at a speech in Washington that "the WikiLeaks episode represents what I would consider a big yellow flag." He added, "I think it is going to have a very chilling effect on the need to share."

Today Clapper is taking a different tone. This week at GEOINT, the annual trade show for the intelligence industry, Clapper said one of his top priorities was to merge intelligence collection with intelligence analysis, a process that by definition would require much more sharing among the 16 U.S. intelligence agencies under his direction.

What has changed in the last year is the technology to catch the next big leaker. [Read more: Lake/Powerwall/19October2011]

The Rise of Secret Warfare. Four months ago, Admiral William McRaven commanded the operation that killed Osama bin Laden. Now, as the new head of U.S. special forces, he argues that his shadowy, secretive warriors are increasingly central to how America and its allies fight.

When the suntanned, towering SEAL testified to the Congressional House Armed Services Committee in September, just a few weeks after he took over his new role, he used posters detailing the growth of his forces. In the decade since September 11 2001, U.S. Special Operations Command personnel numbers have doubled, its budget tripled and deployments quadrupled.

The Bin Laden takedown is simply the tip of an iceberg of fast-growing, largely hidden action by the United States and its allies. Those with knowledge of such operations say this changing state of warfare could spark a range of unintended consequences, from jeopardizing diplomatic relationships to unwanted, wider wars.

That's not entirely new. Secret wars against communism in Southeast Asia in the 1960s helped spawn larger conventional conflicts. In the 1980s, the "Iran-Contra" arms-for-weapons scandal embarrassed the Reagan administration, while support for Islamist guerrillas fighting Russian occupation in Afghanistan helped produce Bin Laden and Al Qaeda.

And it's not just western powers. Just last week, the United States accused Iran of a plot to kill the Saudi ambassador.

The appeal of such tactics is clear. Military operations are far more politically palatable if you keep dead bodies off TV screens. A computer worm planted in Iran's nuclear program, secret help to rebels in Libya, drone strikes to cripple Al Qaeda - all can achieve the desired effect without massive publicity.

In an era of budget cuts, they are also cheap - particularly compared with the cost of maintaining and deploying a large conventional military force. McRaven said his 58,000 operatives cost a mere 1.6 percent of the Pentagon's predicted 2012 budget.

"Put simply, (they) provide a tremendous return on the nation's investment," McRaven told the unclassified portion of the Congressional hearing. "The special operations forces have never been more valuable to our nation and allies around the world than they are today, and that demand will not diminish for the foreseeable future." [Read more: Reuters/18October2011]


Section III - COMMENTARY

In Libya, Echoes of When the CIA's Afghan Funding Went Wrong. For six months - ever since the rebel movement took shape in Benghazi - one of the liveliest guessing games in Libya has been deducing the whys of Qatar's deep intervention in the uprising. After all, for the last decade or so, Qatar ruler Hamad Bin Khalifa al-Thani's main preoccupations have been the accumulation of a fabulous natural gas fortune, and the creation of a wondrously successful all-news TV channel. But now, Sheikh Hamad has deployed jets, military and political emissaries, and tens of millions of dollars to project the influence of his ultra-tiny sheikhdom.

This sudden high profile has generated concern, particularly among those familiar with how similar well-meaning Arab largesse went wrong in 1980s Afghanistan, leading to that nation's long period of jihadism.

Conjecture about Sheikh Hamad's motives has included a desire for regional cachet and an economic payoff (the BBC); a hope to "secure influence and make good friends" (Bloomberg BusinessWeek); and an aim to be a leading voice in Arab nationalism (the New York Times).

But, in a piece this week, the Wall Street Journal delivers contextual reporting that appears to be better anchored. The WSJ story, by Sam Dagher, Charles Levinson and Margaret Coker, describes the Qatari activities in a way reminiscent of the direct Saudi aid that - in parallel to covert U.S. assistance to the anti-Soviet mujahedin - went to then-little known Afghan leaders like Jalaluddin Haqqani and Gulbedin Hekmatyar. [Read more:  LeVine/ForeignPolicy/18October2011] 

The CIA And Ground Truth. The CIA has a new boss, David Petraeus, who formerly commanded American military forces in Afghanistan. With the arrival of Petraeus, the CIA is changing how it goes about determining the situation in Afghanistan. From now on, CIA analysts will discuss the situation with military commanders before they submit their monthly reports, rather than argue with the military leaders after the fact when people note that the military and CIA analysis comes to different conclusions. The CIA may still disagree with the military, but now they have to answer military assertions that contradict what the CIA believes.

Although this new policy was announced after Petraeus took over at the CIA recently, it was actually in the works for months. It was held up when it became clear that Petraeus was going to be the new CIA chief. Petraeus approved the new policy, which he had long been asking for.

All this came about because CIA analysts eventually noted that the military commanders were using different criteria for "success" and that often had uncovered aspects of the situation that the CIA analysts were missing. So, even before Petraeus showed up at CIA headquarters, the intelligence analysts had decided to work more cooperatively with their military counterparts, if only to ensure that all the bases were covered.

The CIA analysts always were at a disadvantage in Afghanistan, and Iraq, because the military was getting their information first hand, while the CIA often was getting it second or third hand. Moreover, the military was more aware of the fact that "success" in Afghanistan depended a lot on what you believed was possible, and what you knew was actually going on. In some cases, the CIA analysts did not appreciate what impact American field operations were having. Afghanistan, to outsiders has always been a murky place, and difficult to read. [Read more: StrategyPage/23October2011]

Thoughts on Ken Anderson's Post on the CIA Drone Program. Over at Opinio Juris, Lawfare Book Review Editor Ken Anderson raises a series of important questions about the CIA drone program. In that post, Ken very kindly notes the relationship of these questions to my Title 10/Title 50 project, and asks me to weigh in. My thoughts appear below, after short restatements of the 8 issues Ken highlighted:

(1) Does CIA involvement in the use of deadly force in itself violate IHL?

I don't think so. For some time after 9/11, the US took the position in the context of military commissions that the use of lethal force by an unprivileged individual was itself a war crime (see, e.g., the Khadr prosecution). My understanding is that this is no longer the U.S. position (note that in al Nashiri, for example, the charge of murder in violation of the law of war is hooked to an allegation of perfidy, not just the absence of combat immunity). The latter view is the correct one, in my view, and it speaks directly to the question of whether CIA control over the drone program is in itself an IHL violation. That is: CIA personnel may be exposed to (theoretical) criminal liability under the domestic law of certain countries (Pakistan), but that does not make the sheer fact of CIA involvement a war crime.

(2) Is the CIA sufficiently accountable in relation to IHL constraints on how force is used?

I agree with Ken that it would be smart policy for the executive branch to make public much more detail about the legal standards (and associated enforcement and training procedures) that notionally would control in relation to any program involving the use of lethal force. I don't agree with Philip Alston that such transparency is itself an actual requirement of international law (see Philip's very interesting article here). By the way, the link to Hank Crumpton's speech, and a transcript of his exchange with Mike Lewis in regards to early CIA efforts to bring in JAG advisers in relation to drones, is here.

(3) Why continue to insist on having the CIA conduct such operations "covertly" when everyone knows they exist? [Read more: Chesney/Lawfare/21October2011]

Intelligence, Policy And The War In Iraq. The major national security controversies over the last decade have revolved around intelligence. Critics blamed the intelligence community for failing to alert policymakers before the September 11 attacks, but others argued that the White House ignored intelligence that warned of the looming danger. Critics of intelligence also blamed it for exaggerating Iraq's capabilities and terrorist links before the war, but others argued that White House pressure caused intelligence leaders to inflate the threat. And the continuing controversy over estimates of the Iranian nuclear program has convinced some observers that the intelligence community is deliberately seeking to constrain policy. As these examples attest, it is impossible to understand contemporary strategic debates without thinking about the role of intelligence in strategy.

Yet despite its importance, the subject has received surprisingly little attention from scholars, and nothing like the gigantic body of research on civil-military relations. A great deal has been written on espionage, analysis, covert action, and deception. Much less has been written about the causes and consequences of intelligence-policy breakdowns. The irony is that the ongoing effort to reform intelligence will be all for naught if the intelligence community cannot build a productive relationship with policymakers. Even the perfect intelligence estimate is useless until it finds a receptive reader.

This E-Note outlines a framework for understanding intelligence-policy relations. It begins by describing intelligence-policy relations in the ideal, and then explaining some of the recurring problems that get in the way of productive interaction. I conclude by returning to the most notorious and controversial case of intelligence-policy failure: the war in Iraq. [Read more: Rovner/EurasiaReview/20October2011]

How to Kill an Ambassador. An increasing number of former intel officers that I network with are convinced that the alleged plot to kill the Saudi Arabian ambassador in Washington is not only completely implausible as described by the Justice Department and White House but also possibly the contrivance of an intelligence or security service other than that of Iran. There is a consensus that the Iranian government has no motive for carrying out the attack, as it would have only further isolated Tehran internationally and could easily have led to massive retaliation. The "rogue element" theory that Iran's fractured politics might mean that someone in the Quds group was actually trying to embarrass someone else in the government has a certain plausibility, but no one who knows anything about Iran actually believes it to be true. Nor is it likely that Iran mounted the complicated operation to avenge the assassinations of several of its nuclear scientists. The scientists were killed by the Israelis, who would have been the target if that had been the case. So the only question becomes, who is doing what to whom and why?

The speculation by Gareth Porter that the whole affair might have been a drug deal that morphed or was manipulated by an FBI sting into yet another terrorism story is compelling. If that was the case, then the U.S. government is guilty yet again of taking a vulnerable individual and turning him to make him into what will pass muster as a genuine terrorist. Nearly every terrorism case since 9/11 has been precisely that - finding a disgruntled individual or group through communications intercepts, inserting an informant into the process, and developing the case to enhance its terrorism potential.

Another possibility that has been mentioned is that it might have been an operation planned by the Mujahedin-e Khalq, or MEK, the Iranian opposition group supported by a number of U.S. lawmakers. But the MEK would not have the resources or technical expertise to carry out such a deception, unless it were working in cooperation with the CIA or the Mossad, which raises the possibility that this has been from the start the work of an intelligence agency rather than law enforcement. [Read more: Giraldi/AntiWar/20October2011]

Another Look at Clapper's Efforts. Time to update our view of the Office of the Director of National Intelligence and the direction it is taking under its director, James R. Clapper Jr.

Clapper is making the integration of collection and analysis his first priority, not just through 17 national intelligence managers - whose job is to coordinate the handling of regional or functional targeted problems - but also through an ambitious multi-year attempt to broaden access to data from all community agencies for those with authority to see it.

"If we integrate intelligence...it makes for a better product for policymakers, decision makers - whether they're sitting in a foxhole or sitting in the White House," Clapper told the Geoint (Geospatial Intelligence) 2011 Symposium, a gathering of intelligence experts, last week.

First a confession. I agreed with those who considered the legislation that established the director of national intelligence (DNI) a bad and unnecessary idea. The move did not reform the intelligence community but rather added a new layer to an already large and competitively structured bureaucracy.

Intelligence functions best when those in charge as well as those below work easily and not competitively with one another. This also assumes the president and his White House staff have some sophistication about the intelligence community and its work.

Before Sept. 11, 2001, the director of central intelligence - who also headed the CIA - was not competing with the secretary of defense because the latter controlled more than 85 percent of the intelligence budget. It was accepted that the CIA and FBI worked in separate lanes, a situation that went back to the days of J. Edgar Hoover, despite attempts by more recent directors to better coordinate activities. [Read more: Pincus/WashtintonPost/24October2011]


Section IV - Obituaries, Books, Research Requests and Coming Events


Obituaries

Gil Hayward. Gil Hayward, who died on October 9 aged 93, contributed to the wartime design of the "Tunny" decryption machines at the Post Office Research Station at Dollis Hill, north London, and later at Bletchley Park.

Tunny was a British re-engineering of the German Lorenz SZ42 cipher machine used in radio teleprinter communications between members of the German High Command. The Lorenz was thus used to transmit even higher grade secrets than the more famous Enigma machine, which had only three or four encoding "wheels" compared to the Lorenz's 12.

The original break into Lorenz had occurred after a German cipher clerk enciphered two long messages using the same initial settings of the machine's 12 wheels, and in early 1944 the decision was made to construct a number of replica machines, under the direction of Tommy Flowers, at the Post Office Research Station at Dollis Hill.

Intercepted messages in code could be fed into these Tunny machines, but the problem remained of how to determine which wheel settings to employ to produce the messages in deciphered "clear". Painfully slow decrypting work was done by hand until the development of the Colossus machine, now recognised as the first modern computer. Its calculating power reduced the time spent establishing the wheel settings from several weeks to a few days, allowing commanders in the field to act on the resulting information.

At Dollis Hill, Hayward's electronic engineering expertise proved crucial to the successful development of Tunny and Colossus. Towards the end of the war, up to 15 of the Tunny machines were in use at Bletchley Park, providing Allied leaders with around 300 messages from the German High Command a week. Among other things, Tunny provided key intelligence for D-Day. [Read more:  Telegraph/21October2011] 

Dennis Chapman. Dennis Chapman, 67, a retired officer of the National Security Agency who later worked as an intelligence and information systems officer with Raytheon, died Oct. 7 at Anne Arundel Medical Center. He had neuroendocrine lung cancer, his wife, Carolyn Chapman, said.

Mr. Chapman worked with NSA from 1966 until 2004, when he retired as a senior executive. His career included duty in the White House situation room, directing the State Department's office of intelligence support.

He led the National Security Operations Center at NSA and held two positions overseas, serving in England and Panama.

He received a meritorious civilian service award and the director's distinguished service medal.

At Raytheon, Mr. Chapman was director of NSA programs in intelligence and information systems from 2006 until his death.

Dennis Lee Chapman was born in Cleveland and grew up in Chagrin Falls, Ohio. He graduated from Michigan State University in 1966 and received a master's degree in business administration at American University in 1971.

He lived in Severna Park. He coached youth softball and soccer and was a former commissioner of a youth lacrosse league. He was a member of First Presbyterian Church in Annapolis.

Survivors include his wife of 45 years, Carolyn Jarva Chapman of Severna Park; two children, Kristin Chapman of Annapolis and Jeffrey Chapman of Orlando; and two grandchildren. [Read more: Barnes/WashingtonPost/21October2011]


Books

Federal Bureaucracy and the Price of Integrity. Talk about coincidence: just the other day, I was thinking of Paul Pillar, currently on the faculty at Georgetown University. He was National Intelligence Officer for the Near East during the run-up to the Iraq War. I was wondering what Pillar was doing now, and lo and behold the next day I see in the New York Times that he has a new book out, Intelligence and U.S. Foreign Policy: 9/11 and Misguided Intelligence Reform (Columbia University Press).

I haven't read Pillar's latest book, but I will. As a matter of fact, of the glut of books that examines U.S. foreign policy post-9/11, Pillar's book will probably be the only one that I will read.

In 2002-2003, I was working in OSD and was involved in the planning for the Iraq War. Even though I was in a policy position at the time, I worked closely with the intelligence staff at the Pentagon - I was on a detail from my home office, after all, an intelligence agency - and was aware of the intense pressure the administration was putting on the intelligence community to support its position.

Pillar was one of the very few people in the intelligence community willing to stand up to the pressure - the bullying, really - from the administration. He didn't act as though he believed he had a snowball's chance in hell to prevail, but he tried anyway, when other men would've capitulated or looked the other way. Like many people involved in the Iraq effort, I know what was going on, and I admired what Paul was doing tremendously.

He was, of course, forced to resign. I don't know the details, but you don't disagree with the office of the president and expect to keep your job, even if you're right. Even if you're only trying to do the thing you were hired for: to tell truth to power. [Read more: Katsu/HuffingtonPost/19October2011]

A High Price: The Triumphs and Failures of Israeli Counterterrorism. Faced with terrorist attacks (and conventional military attacks) by its Palestinian and Arab state neighbors since the earliest days of its existence, Israel has had to develop exceptionally effective counterterrorism capabilities to protect its citizens on all fronts, making it one of the world's most innovative and toughest counterterrorism "powers." This subject is discussed in Daniel Byman's "A High Price: The Triumphs and Failures of Israeli Counterterrorism," a comprehensive account of the effectiveness of Israel's counterterrorism campaigns since the country became independent in 1948.

Mr. Byman, a prolific author of numerous books and articles on Middle East security issues, is a professor at Georgetown University's School of Foreign Service. This book is enriched by his research visits to Israel and meetings with leading Israeli security officials cited throughout the volume.

One of the book's strengths is its overview of the multiple types of terrorist threats that have confronted Israel over the years. These threats began before 1948, with the Palestinian Arab community's opposition to the establishment of a Jewish state in part of Palestine. Although not mentioned by the author, those pre-state Palestinian terrorist groups were similar in their religious militancy to today's Hamas, while the primary Palestinian organization that was established in 1964, the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO), adopted the pseudo-secular and left-wing slogans of 1940s anti-colonialist national liberation movements. [Read more: Sinai/WashingtonTimes/18October2011]


Research Requests

John Robert Peters.

Dear Sirs -

My name is Keleigh Peters Paino and I am looking for information about my Grandfather, John Robert Peters. I have been directed to your organization by Mr. Dino Brugioni. After reading one of Mr. Brugioni's books, Photo Fakery, I thought he might have known my Grandfather. Unfortunately he did not but suggested I contact your Association. It is my understanding that my Grandfather was a CIA agent from about 1952 until he retired in 1973. I have been told that he was an avid photographer and it was his photography skills that originally brought him to the CIA. I do not have any information about his career or work life except that he worked for the CIA after leaving the Vermont State Police in 1951. He might have worked for the FBI prior to becoming a Merchant Marine in WWII.

I have begun a family history project with a cousin of mine and we know very little about who our Grandfather was. Unfortunately, he died in 1974 and we were both so young, we didn't get to know him. We are interested in finding out about his career, where he might have worked and what type of work he did. It seems he took this information to his grave. I am looking for any direction or information I can find. Your help with this would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks for your help in advance.

Best regards,

Keleigh Paino
126 Terrace Tay
Peachtree City, GA 30269
Home - 770-631-4654
Cell - 770-634-0245
kpaino@bellsouth.net


Coming Educational Events

EDUCATIONAL EVENTS IN COMING TWO MONTHS....

MANY Spy Museum Events in October, November, and beyond, with full details are listed on the AFIO Website at www.afio.com. The titles for some of these are in detail below and online.

Wednesday, 26 October 2011, noon - Washington, DC - MH/CHAOS: The CIA's Campaign Against the Radical Left and the Black Panthers

Operation MHCHAOS was the code name for a secret domestic spying program conducted by the Central Intelligence Agency in the late 1960s and early 1970s charged with unmasking any foreign influences on the student antiwar movement. CIA counterintelligence officer Frank Rafalko was a part of the operation. The New York Times revealed MHCHAOS in 1974, then Congress investigated, and MHCHAOS took its place in the pantheon of intelligence abuses. Rafalko, however, says in MH/CHAOS that the operation was justified and that the CIA was the logical agency to conduct it. He’ll defend his perspective with dramatic intelligence collected on the New Left and black radicals.
Tickets:  Free.  No registration required. More information at www.spymuseum.org

26 October 2011, 3 pm – Center Valley, PA – DeSales University National Security Program hosts Dr. William Nolte on “The Prospects of the Intelligence Community in the Face of Budget Reductions.”

Dr. William Nolte currently serves as Research Professor and Director, Programs for Intelligence Research and Education, School of Public Policy at the University of Maryland.  During his 30-year career in the intelligence community Dr. Nolte held a number of senior positions, including Director of Education and Training in the Office of the Director of National Intelligence, and Chancellor of the National Intelligence University.  Also he was an Assistant Deputy Director of National Intelligence and Deputy Assistant Director of Central Intelligence for Analysis and Production.  While at the National Security Agency he was Director of Training, Chief of Legislative Affairs, and Senior Intelligence Advisor to the Director of Signals Intelligence. The event takes place in the Hurd Room in the DeSales University Center on the DeSales University Campus (2755 Station Avenue, Center Valley, PA 18034).  For questions please email Dr. Andrew Essig at Andrew.Essig@desales.edu or call 610-282-1100 x1632.  No RSVP is required.  This event in open to the public and free of charge

Thursday, 27 October 2011 - Washington, DC - CIA Historical Collections Division Conference: "A City Torn Apart; Building the Berlin Wall - 1961"

The Berlin Crisis of 1961 - "Building the Wall, From Vienna to Checkpoint Charlie" - Date: Thursday October 27, 2011, Location: McGowan Theater, National Archives Building, Washington DC; Time: 9:00am to 12:00pm

The National Declassification Center at the National Archives, in partnership with the Historical Review Program of the CIA, will be a hosting a one-day conference to mark the anniversary of the Berlin Crisis of 1961. October 27th, 2011 is the 50th anniversary of the American/Soviet showdown at Checkpoint Charlie. At the McGowan theater at the Archives building in downtown Washington, D.C. a panel of distinguished historians will present topics such as "How the East German Leadership Persuaded the Reluctant Soviets to Build the Berlin Wall", "Events and Decisions Leading Up to the Building of the Berlin Wall - The East German Perspective" and "The U.S. Military Response to the 1960-62 Berlin Crisis." The last person to cross the Potsdamer Platz in a car as the Wall was being erected, Dr. William R. Smyser, will be sharing his personal recollections of the Crisis.

A publication of newly released declassified documents will accompany the event. Documents include intelligence reports, U.S. Army and NATO contingency plans, memoranda, photographs and maps of the earliest stages of the Berlin Wall, and a contemporary 600-page State Department analysis covering the situation in Berlin from 1958-1962.

Scheduled Speakers: Archivist of the United States, David Ferriero
Director, Information Management Services, CIA- Joseph Lambert
Adjunct Professor BMW Center for German and European Studies at Georgetown University in Washington - Dr. William R. Smyser
Central Intelligence Agency, Dr. Donald P. Steury
US Army Center of Military History- Dr. Don Carter
Supreme Headquarters Allied Powers Europe (SHAPE) - Dr. Gregg Pedlow
Associate Professor of History and International Affairs at George Washington University - Dr. Hope Harrison
Central Intelligence Agency - Mr. Lou MehrerReservations: For seat reservations, please send an e-mail to berlin.1961crisis@nara.gov that includes: your name; e-mail address; phone number; number of seats desired (limit 2 per name) For more information: Please email all inquiries to berlin.1961crisis@nara.gov More information at NARA can be found at....

http://www.archives.gov/research/foreign-policy/cold-war/1961-berlin-crisis/2011-conference.html

27 October 2011, 0930- 1715 - Newport News - AFIO Norman Forde Hampton Roads Chapter Third Annual Workshop on National Security and Intelligence: Energy Security

Location: Christopher Newport University, David Student Union, Newport News, Tabb Library, York County. Directions: From Norfolk take I-64 West. Merge onto US-17 North via Exit 258B toward Yorktown. Follow US-17 North approximately 2.2 miles to Victory Blvd/VA-171 East. Turn right onto Victory Blvd/VA-171 East. Turn right at the next traffic light onto Hampton Hwy/VA-134 South. Turn right at the next traffic light onto Long Green Blvd. Tabb Library is on the immediate right. It is across the street from the Victory YMCA. From Williamsburg take I-64 East. Merge onto Victory Blvd/VA-171 East via Exit 256B. Follow Victory Blvd/VA-171 East approximately 2 miles. Turn right onto Hampton Hwy/VA-134 South. Turn right at the next traffic light onto Long Green Blvd. Tabb Library is on the immediate right. It is across the street from the Victory YMCA. Registrations and questions to Melissa Saunders mwsaunders@cox.net or call 757-897-6268.

28 October 2011, 12:30 - 2:30 pm - Los Angeles, CA - The AFIO Los Angeles Area Chapter meeting features Dan Caldwell on "Vortex of Conflict: US Policy Towards Afghanistan, Pakistan, and Iraq."
This is not a luncheon; it is a meeting, only. Plan to eat before or after event.
The guest speaker will be Dan Caldwell, Distinguished Professor of Political Science at Pepperdine University and the author of "Vortex of Conflict: U.S. Policy toward Afghanistan, Pakistan, and Iraq" (Stanford University Press, 2011). Professor Caldwell will be addressing the findings of his book.
Location: Room 35 at LMU [Loyola Marymount University].
RSVP AFIO_LA@yahoo.com to attend.

2-3 November 2-11 - Buckley AFB, Aurora, CO - DNI hosts 2011 Intelink Technical Exchange.
The ITE [Intelink Technical Exchange] brings together practitioners and technologists from the intelligence, national defense, homeland security, and law enforcement communities working to improve intelligence information sharing. The ITE is open to government employees and contractors. AFIO members may attend but need to show AFIO ID.
CALL FOR PAPERS: If you wish to present at the ITE, send your abstracts by September 15, 2011 to ITE@ugov.gov Your topic should describe substantive technical work area relevant to the National Security Enterprise, our information environment, or the business of intelligence.
Contact ITE@ugov.gov for additional information

Wednesday, 02 November 2011 12:30 - 5:30 PM - Simi Valley, CA - CIA Document Release Event at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Foundation & Library, Simi Valley, California

Ronald Reagan, Intelligence, and the End of the Cold War will feature high-level former policymakers, intelligence practitioners, and analysts discussing how the Reagan Administration used intelligence in making policies to end the Cold War. The CIA is releasing a collection of more than 200 declassified documents, including intelligence assessments, high-level memos, and briefing materials provided to the Administration during this period. Also included are never-before-seen video briefings prepared by the CIA’s Directorate of Intelligence and delivered to policymakers on such varied topics as the Soviet space program, the Andropov succession, the Chernobyl disaster, and the Moscow summit. This event is free to attend, however reservations are required.

Featured guest speakers include Kenneth Adelman, Former Director, Arms Control and Disarmament Agency and Oleg Kalugin, Former Major General in the Soviet KGB.

Panelists include: Peter Clement, CIA Deputy Director for Intelligence for Analytic Programs; Douglas MacEachin, Former CIA Deputy Director of Intelligence; Admiral Bobby Inman, Former CIA Deputy Director; Martin Anderson, Former Advisor to President Reagan; Gregory Treverton, Director, RAND Center for Global Risk and Security; David Holloway, Stanford University; Mary Sarotte, University of Southern California; Bruce D. Berkowitz, Author; Dr. Nicholas Dujmovic, CIA Historian; and David Lodge, CIA Analyst.

Location: The Ronald Reagan Presidential Library, 40 Presidential Dr, Simi Valley, CA 93065

Click here to make reservations. For more information, please call 805-577-4141 or visit this link. There is no fee to attend.

Wednesday, 9 November 2011, 11:30AM - Scottsdale, AZ - AFIO Arizona hosts Dr. Timothy Rodgers on "Covert Operations"

Dr. Timothy Rodgers, Director of the Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art & Claire C .Carter, Assistant Curator
“Covert Operations: contemporary artists investigating the known unknowns”
Dr. Timothy Rodgers, Director of the Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art, and Claire C. Carter, Assistant Curator, will present six contemporary artists whose artwork considers illegal extradition flights, governmental archives, border and immigration sites, military and reconnaissance satellites, cryptology and terrorist profiling. At the heart of their art practices, these artists often use traditional research methods including the Freedom of Information Act to collect and reveal unreported information. Dr. Rodgers and Ms. Carter will examine their complex artworks and their (often) ambiguous conclusions.
The artists presented will include Thomas Demand, Trevor Paglen, Jim Sanborn, Taryn Simon, David Taylor and Kerry Tribe.
Location: McCormick Ranch Golf Course, 7505 McCormick Pky, Scottsdale AZ 85258
RSVP no later than 72 hours ahead of time, and if you register but do not show up you will be charged for the uncanceled meal. Please respond to this email to confirm your presence (or not).
Fees: $20 for AFIO members; $22 for guests; $25 for AFIO Members with NO RSVPs as per the requested date; All NO SHOWS or last minute cancellations will be charged for the lunch before they can attend future events.
For reservations or questions, please email ON OR BEFORE September 12, 2011 Simone simone@4smartphone.net or simone@afioaz.org or call and leave a message on 602.570.6016

Saturday, 12 November 2011, 11 am - 3 pm - Orange Park, FL - AFIO North Florida meeting features Col Will Merrill, speaking on Heroes of 9/11.
This meeting’s special guest and speaker will be Colonel Will G. Merrill, Jr., U.S. Army (Retired) who was to have spoken at our cancelled August meeting. A native of Ashland, Wisconsin, he graduated from the United States Military Academy at West Point in the Class of 1958. He will be speaking about his many and diverse Army experiences, and has recently authored a book on the Heros of 9/11.
Cost: $16 pp.
RSVP and inquiries to: qbegonia@comcast.net

Tuesday, 15 November 2011, Noon to 1 pm - Washington, DC - "Uncompromised: The Rise, Fall, and Redemption of an Arab American Patriot in the CIA" - Nada Prouty speaks at the Spy Museum

After a childhood in war-torn Lebanon with an abusive father and facing the prospect of an arranged marriage, Nada Prouty jumped at the chance to forge her own path in America, a path that led to undercover work in the FBI, then the CIA. She worked quietly and professionally behind the scenes of some of the most high-profile cases in recent history, including the hunt for Saddam Hussein and the bombing of the USS Cole. Her work earned her great respect from her colleagues but her promising career came to an end in the wake of 9/11. At the height of anti-Arab fervor, federal investigators charged Prouty with passing intelligence to Hezbollah. Lacking sufficient evidence to make their case in court, prosecutors went to the media, suggesting that she had committed treason. Prouty, dubbed “Jihad Jane” by the New York Post and castigated in the blogosphere, was quickly cast as a terrorist mastermind by the relentless 24-hour news cycle. Though the CIA and a federal judge eventually exonerated Prouty of all charges, she was dismissed from the agency and stripped of her citizenship. In Uncompromised, Prouty tells her story in a bid to restore her name and reputation.
Tickets: Free. No registration required. Directions and more information available at: www.spymuseum.org

Tuesday, 15 November 2011, Noon - 1 p.m. - Washington, DC - The Vietnam War From The Rear Echelon: An Intelligence Officer's Memoir, 1972-1973 - at the International Spy Museum

Military intelligence officer Timothy Lomperis served in the headquarters of Military Assistance Command, Vietnam (MACV) during some of the most dramatic days of the Vietnam War: the 1972 North Vietnamese Easter Offensive, the Christmas Bombings and the Paris Peace Talks. He and his comrades were deeply involved in trying to devise and implement military strategies while caught between the political imperatives of Washington and the deteriorating military situation on the ground. In his new book, Lomperis assesses the strengths and weaknesses of American intelligence in Vietnam and details the intense debates over the use and targeting of the prime U.S. weapon remaining in the war, the notorious B-52 bomber. He will discuss his participation in a secret mission designed to end the war until it was thwarted by a shocking interruption and his own gradual disillusionment that ultimately resolved itself into peaceful reconciliation.
Tickets: Free. No registration required. For more information visit www.spymuseum.org

Tuesday, 15 November 2011, 5:30 - 8:30 pm - Washington, DC - CIA Officer/author Richard Holm [The Craft We Chose: My Life in the CIA], many others, at The National Press Club's Book Fair & Author's Night

A large number of authors will be present at the annual NPC Book Fair held in the club's ballroom, 13th floor of the National Press Building, 14th and F Sts NW in Washington. Admission is free to club members and $5.00 for non-members. All are welcome, and all proceeds benefit the club's library and journalism programs.
Among the 80 authors selected to sign books and meet attendees, in addition to Dick Holm with "The Craft We Chose: My Life in the CIA"; will be Nada Prouty with her "Uncompromised: The Rise, Fall, and Redemption of an Arab American Patriot in the CIA"; and Ronald Kessler with his "The Secrets of the FBI"; Pamela Constable with "Playing with Fire: Pakistan at War with Itself"; and Joby Warrick with his chilling account of "The Triple Agent: The al-Qaeda Mole Who Infiltrated the CIA."
More info at: http://press.org/library/book-fair/authors-and-books.
Attendance is only $5 for a serious book feast.

Thursday, 17 November 2011, 11:30 am Colorado Springs, CO – The Rocky Mountain Chapter presents Sheriff Terry Maketa speaking about his official visits to Israel and Trinidad.  This should be an interesting talk as El Paso County Sheriff’s rarely travel this far from home.  Dick Durham will lead the meeting as the President will be in London on his own fact finding and gathering mission.  To be held at a new location, The Inn at Palmer Divide, 443 S. Highway 105 Palmer Lake, CO, Exit 161 westbound off I-25, West on Highway 105.  Please RSVP to Tom VanWormer at robsmom@pcisys.net

17 November 2011 - San Francisco, CA - The AFIO Jim Quesada Chapter hosts Richard W. Held, former Special Agent in Charge, San Francisco Division, Federal Bureau of Investigation. Topic: The Cyber Threat: Changing the Nature of Future Conflict.

11:30AM no host cocktails; noon - luncheon. $25 member rate with advance reservation and payment; $35 non-members accompanied by a member. No walk-ins allowed. Seating is limited. E-mail RSVP to Mariko Kawaguchi (please indicate meat or fish) no later than October 29, 2011 at afiosf@aol.com and mail a check made out to "AFIO" to: Mariko Kawaguchi, P.O. Box 117578, Burlingame, CA 94011

Friday, 18 November 2011, 4:30 pm - Washington, DC - STALIN’S SPIES: FROM PARIS TO THE GULAG at the International Spy Museum

The Soviet Union’s very own James Bond, Dimitri Bystrolyotov, was one of the greatest Soviet Spies of all time. Dimitri was a sailor, doctor, lawyer and artist recruited by Stalin for his dashing good looks and ease with languages to seduce secrets from willing targets during the 1920s and 30s. However, after falling out of Stalin’s favor, Dimitri was sentenced to the Gulag for 16 years. In this behind-the-scenes event you will see powerful artifacts from Bystrolyotov’s life in the Gulag donated by his family, meet the Museum’s Historian and Collections Manager, and hear from a panel of top experts on the subject of Stalin’s spies: Prof. Emil Draitser, author of Stalin’s Romeo Spy, on Bystrolyotov; journalist and author Stephen Schwartz on NKVD Recruitment of intellectuals; and Prof. Susan Weissman on Marc Zborowski, who spied on Trotskyites in France and the United States. Finally, hear commentary from Peter Katel of Congressional Quarterly who will recount his parents’ encounter with one of these spies. This special afternoon concludes as speakers, staff, and guests continue the discussion over drinks with complementary light appetizers just around the corner at Riot Act Comedy Theater.

Tickets: Free. Space is limited. Register online at www.spymuseum.org

19 November 2011 - Melbourne, FL - The AFIO Florida Satellite Chapter luncheon features Gen John Cleland on "Radical Islam."

Major General John Cleland (Ret.) speaks on "Radical Islam." Lunch will be at the Eau Gallie Yacht Club. For further information, contact Donna Czarnecki at donnacz@aol.com.

30 November - 1 December 2011 - Fairfax, VA - NMIA Fall 2011 National Intelligence Symposium

The theme of this event is: "Intelligence / Information For Small Unit Operations". Small units have been and may increasingly be the foremost U.S. National Security direct action tool. Taking down high-profile terrorists, conducting counterinsurgency engagements, SWAT Team deployments, first responders and fighting fires - - small units have unique and dynamic intelligence / information needs. Yet while they are at the pointy-end of the spear; they are also at the end of the last mile. What do they need? Are they getting it? How can it be improved? The NMIA Symposium features an array of distinguished experts; let by the invited Keynote, LTG Michael Flynn, US Army; who recently led U.S. intelligence efforts in Afghanistan. Location: Northrup Grumman, Fairfax, Virginia
Register at https://nmia.site-ym.com/events/register.asp?id=186505

Thursday, 8 December 2011, 10:30 am - 2 pm - Tysons Corner, VA - AFIO Winter Luncheon - Speaker: John D. Bennett, Director, National Clandestine Service, CIA and J.M. Berger, author of JIHAD JOE: Americans Who Go To War In The Name of Islam

Speaker: John D. Bennett, Director, National Clandestine Service, CIA, OFF THE RECORD, and morning speaker J.M. Berger, author of JIHAD JOE: Americans Who Go To War In The Name of Islam. Location: Crowne Plaza, Tysons Corner, VA Register here.

8 December 2011, 6 - 9 pm - New York, NY - The AFIO NY Metro Chapter meeting features Jim Rasenberger on "The Brilliant Disaster: JFK, Castro, and America's Doomed Invasion of Cuba's Bay of Pigs"

Jim Rasenberger, Author: "THE BRILLIANT DISASTER: JFK, CASTRO AND AMERICA'S DOOMED INVASION OF CUBA'S BAY OF PIGS" April 17, 1961 "How could we have been so stupid" remarked one administration official. Did this "doomed invasion" contribute to the Cuban Missile Crisis, the Vietnam War and the assassination of President Kennedy? LOCATION: "3 West Club" 3 West 51st Street, Manhattan.

6:00 PM Registration 6:30 PM Meeting Start Please Note this Time Change from our usual start. Buffet Dinner Cash Bar COST: $40/person. Cash or Check, payable at the door only.
REGISTER: Strongly suggested, not required. Seating is limited.
Email: afiometro@yahoo.com or telephone Jerry Goodwin 347-334-1503.


For Additional Events two+ months or greater....view our online Calendar of Events


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