AFIO Weekly Intelligence Notes #16-13 dated 22 April 2013

[Editors' Note: The WIN editors attempt to include a wide range of articles and commentary in the Weekly Notes to inform and educate our readers. However, the views expressed in the articles are purely those of the authors, and in no way reflect support or endorsement from the WIN editors or the AFIO officers and staff. We welcome comments from the WIN readers on any and all articles and commentary.]
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CONTENTS

Section I - INTELLIGENCE HIGHLIGHTS

Section II - CONTEXT & PRECEDENCE

Section III - COMMENTARY

Section V - Jobs, Books, Research Requests and Coming Events

Jobs

Books

Research Requests

Coming Educational Events

Current Calendar New and/or Next Two Months ONLY

 

Spy Cruise on the Queen Mary II

Schedule your participation now.

31 May - 12 June 2013
Departs NYC for England
"The Spying Game: The Cold War and Cambridge"
aboard the Queen Mary 2
with Intelligence Expert and AFIO Board Member Nigel West

Immerse yourself in the shadowy underworld of international espionage with renowned author and intelligence expert Nigel West. Learn the truth behind the acronyms of the CIA, SOE, NKVD and KGB, as well as the role of "sleeper agents," the secret VENONA project and the race for atomic power. Aboard the elite Queen Mary 2, gain intimate vantages into the post-World War II geopolitical, ideological and economic struggles that shaped the world today. Highlights • Gain expert insight into Yalta, the Manhattan Project and the greatest secret of the Cold War: VENONA. • Visit Bletchley Park, home to the Enigma machine and historic headquarters of secret British code-breaking in World War II. • At colleges associated with the Cambridge Five, learn how a group of undergraduates became a famous Soviet spy ring. Activity Notes Walking up to two miles per day. Itinerary Summary Arrival New York City, NY, 1 night; embark Queen Mary 2, 7 nights; disembark, Cambridge, 4 nights; departure.
For more information or to book your participation: visit www.roadscholar.org and select Program #14569


REGISTRATION FOR AFIO's SPRING LUNCHEON

FRIDAY, 10 May 2013

Space limited.

Badge Pick-up at 10:30 a.m.

1 p.m. speaker

David R. Shedd

Deputy Director,
Defense Intelligence Agency


11 a.m. speaker

Col. John B. Alexander, PhD

Senior Fellow with
the Joint Special Operations
University; Former Green Beret Commander,
Los Alamos Project Director

Presenting his findings on....

UFOs and the Intelligence Community

3-course Lunch at Noon

Check-in for badge pickup at 10:30 a.m.
Col. Alexander begins his presentation at 11 a.m.
Lunch served at noon
Deputy Director Shedd begins his presentation at 1 pm
Morning and Afternoon programs are On The Record

The latest intelligence books, and many others, for sale throughout event.

Event closes at 2 p.m.

Complete Registration Form HERE
EVENT LOCATION: The Crowne Plaza
1960 Chain Bridge Road • McLean, Virginia 22102
Driving directions here or use this link: http://tinyurl.com/boey9vf
 

SPYPEDIA UPDATE of 19 April 2013: On 15 April 2013 a major terrorist attack occurred at the finish line of the Boston Marathon. Three were killed and at least 183 were wounded in the twin bombings, which occurred roughly 12 seconds apart. The suspects have been identified as Dzhokhar A. Tsarnaev (19) and Tamerlan Tsarnaev (26), two brothers from Chechnya. Late on 18 April 2013, an MIT campus police officer was killed in his patrol car on campus. Tamerlan Tsarnaev was killed following a shootout with police officers after a carjacking and chase to Watertown, MA overnight on 18 April 2013. A police officer was also critically wounded in the gun shootout and the brothers also threw explosive devices at the police officers. The massive manhunt against Dzhokhar is continuing; and SPYPEDIA will continue to update the profile as developments continue. In the wake of the Boston Bombings, on 16 April 2013, two letters containing ricin were intercepted. The letters were addressed to President Obama and Senator Roger Wicker. Paul Kevin Curtis was originally charged with threatening to do bodily harm against the President of the United States but later investigations caused these charges to be suspended. William Colton MILLAY has been sentenced to 16 years in prison for attempting to sell national security information to a person he believed to be a Russian agent. MILLAY claimed to have information on the U.S. Army's electronic systems when he approached a woman he knew as "Natalia," and whom he believed to be a foreign agent. The trials of former Dutch diplomat Raymond POETERAY and his SVR illegal handlers Andreas and Heidrun ANSCHLAG are continuing in the Netherlands and Germany. POETERAY faces at least 15 years in prison for passing at least 650 classified documents to Russia through the ANSCHLAGS. Retired Taiwanese Vice Admiral Ko Cheng-sheng is being investigated on suspicion of belonging to the Chang Chih-hsin Spy Network. A new espionage profile has been added for a suspected Iranian spy ring in Saudi Arabia, whose members were arrested last month. This comes as there are increasing concerns over Iran's Nuclear Program as negotiators attempt to negotiate a diplomatic solution. There are also rising concerns over North Korea, after the country threatened to attack South Korea without warning and fears that the country may test a mid-range ballistic missile. North Korea has recently made demands that sanctions be lifted and joint military exercises ended as a precondition for talks.
if you are not a subscriber to the CiCentre's SPYPEDIA, you are missing a lot of the latest documents and news on espionage and counterterrorism. Spypedia subscribers should login on a daily basis to stay abreast of the latest espionage, counterterrorism, security and cybersecurity news from around the globe. All new additions can be found by simply navigating to the "New Content" tab, which features the most recent updates in the SPYPEDIA database. Subscribe to SPYPEDIA with a 30% discount. Use code SPY30 -Centre for Counterintelligence and Security Studies (CI Centre)

Section I - INTELLIGENCE HIGHLIGHTS

CIA, FBI, Military Interrogators Ready to Question Boston Bombing Suspect. Federal prosecutors on Sunday were preparing to file charges against the surviving suspect in the Boston Marathon bombing, even as he remained under heavy guard at a local hospital amid questions about whether authorities would be able to interrogate him.

Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, 19, was in critical but stable condition with a gunshot wound to the neck, Boston police said Sunday, and federal and local officials said they were unsure he would be able to talk again. "We don't know if we'll ever be able to question the individual," Boston Mayor Thomas Menino said Sunday.

The full extent of Tsarnaev's injuries, and whether he sustained them in a gun battle with police more than 12 hours before his capture Friday evening, remained unclear. Officials at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center - the same hospital where his older brother, Tamerlan, 26, was pronounced dead Friday after a shootout with police in the Boston suburb of Watertown - referred questions about Dzhokhar's condition to the FBI, which declined to comment.

Authorities are eager to question Tsarnaev about his alleged motives in last Monday's bombing, which killed three people, injured more than 170 and rattled the nation more than a decade after the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks. They also want to determine from him whether any international or domestic terrorist groups were involved. Islamist separatists in the Russian province of Dagestan, where Tamerlan Tsarnaev visited last year, Sunday denied any connection to the bombing.

A special team of interrogators from the CIA, FBI and the military is expected to question the suspect. Boston's mayor and police commissioner said Sunday that the brothers appear to have acted alone. [Read more: WashingtonPost/21April2013]

Air Force Again Beats Army in Cyber-Defense Competition. Air Force edged out Army in the 13th annual Cyber-Defense Exercise between the nation's service academies on Friday.

This annual battle might not yet have achieved the same mythic status as, say, the Army-Navy football game.

But it's important in preparing the next generation of military leaders to defend the nation against cyberattacks.

Established in 2001 by the National Security Agency, the exercise challenges future Army, Navy, Air Force and Coast Guard personnel to design, build and configure a real-world computer network like the kind you would find in a deployed joint-service command post.

Then the "enemy," in the form of NSA and Department of Defense personnel, looks for vulnerabilities and launches attacks on all the systems over a three-day period. [Read more: Randall/RecordOnline/20April2013]

New Details on Disclosure Regarding North Korea. The nation's top intelligence official said Thursday that a one-paragraph assessment about North Korea's ability to arm a nuclear missile was mistakenly declassified by the Pentagon's intelligence agency, an inadvertent disclosure that revealed competing views on the country within the United States' spy agencies. 

After the conclusion became public at a Congressional hearing last week, the official, James R. Clapper Jr., the director of national intelligence, issued a statement saying that the position by the Defense Intelligence Agency did not reflect the consensus view of the 15 other intelligence agencies.

But Mr. Clapper, in testimony to the Senate Armed Services Committee, offered new details and a fuller explanation of why the D.I.A.'s conclusion last month - with "moderate confidence" - that North Korea has learned how to shrink a nuclear weapon to fit into a nuclear warhead was at odds with all the other intelligence agencies.

"The difference has to do with the confidence level in the actual ability of the North Koreans to make a weapon that will work in a missile," Mr. Clapper, said, adding that since the North has yet to test such a weapon, "neither we nor the North Koreans know whether they have such capability."

Mr. Clapper continued: "D.I.A. has a higher confidence level than the rest of the community on that capability. That's the difference." [Read more: Schmitt/NYTimes/18April2013]

Dutch Diplomat Sentenced to 12 Years for Spying. A Dutch court sentenced a diplomat to 12 years in prison Tuesday for delivering confidential NATO and European Union documents to Russian agents. The case, one of the worst spying affairs in the Netherlands in memory, is linked to that of a couple on trial in Germany on similar charges.

In Tuesday's ruling, a three-judge panel at The Hague District Court said Raymond Poeteray had damaged the interests of the Dutch state and its allies by passing on sensitive military and political documents.

"The court considers it proven that he passed on confidential documents to the Russian Federation for years and on assignment from the Russian foreign intelligence service," presiding judge A.J. Milius said, reading a written summary of the panel's ruling.

He said Poeteray gave the Russians information about the civil war in Libya, EU fact-finding missions in Georgia, and Dutch peacekeeping missions in Kosovo and Afghanistan, causing "substantial" damage.

"In addition, (Poeteray) did not shy away from giving away confidential and very private personal information about seven colleagues," potentially making them vulnerable to blackmail, the judge said. [Read more: Sterling/AP/23April2013]

Ex-CIA Boss David Petraeus to be NY College Prof. Ex-CIA director David Petraeus is replacing one kind of intelligence work with another.

Macaulay Honors College at City University of New York said Tuesday the retired four-star general has been named a visiting professor for public policy. He starts Aug. 1.

Petraeus has a doctorate from Princeton University and has written widely on international relations, military strategy and tactics and national security issues.

He says in a statement released by Macaulay he's pleased to teach at the college, where most students are children of immigrants. He says he looks forward to leading a seminar on the global economic slowdown. [Read more: AP/23April2013]

Report Shows 4.9 million People Hold Security Clearances, Number May be All-Time-High. More people than ever have access to classified information and that number continues to rise, according to a report from the Office of the Director of National Intelligence.

The report is required as part of the Intelligence Authorization Act of 2010 and includes the total number of security clearances across the government sectors and the timeliness in granting those clearances.

The report shows 4.9 million people are cleared for access to classified information. The number of contractors who held clearance declined in 2012 but the number of eligible government employees grew at a rate of 1.1 percent above the previous year.

"It is possible that there were more security-cleared Americans at some points during the Cold War, when there was a larger standing military with more cleared military personnel than there are today. But until 2010, no comprehensive account of the size of the security clearance system had ever been produced. So the new 4.9 million figure is the largest official figure ever published," the report noted.

Of those with clearances, 791,200 government workers, 483,263 contractors and 135,506 workers designated as "others" hold top-secret clearances. Those numbers are up for government workers and contractors but down for the other employees. [Read more: Gore/AL/16April2013]

FBI Finds No Ricin at Defense Intelligence Agency Mail Facility. The FBI ruled as false alarm reports by the Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) and Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) that a package laced with the deadly biological substance ricin was found Tuesday in the DIA's mail sorting facility at Joint Base Anacostia-Bolling.

Two people were hospitalized as a precaution, the FBI said, according to The Hill.

DIA spokesman Lt. Col. Thomas Veale issued a statement at past 5 p.m. that no suspicious packages or letters with ricin were located after a thorough investigation of its mail screening facility and equipment. However, the FBI took samples for further testing off-site, Veale said.

About one hour earlier, Veale said DIA security personnel detected a potentially harmful substance during routine screening of incoming mails. At the Senate, Reid told reporters he read a note telling of the ricin incident at the Bolling Air Force Base, now named as Joint Base Anacostia-Bolling. [Read more: AHN/GantDaily/23April2013]


Section II - CONTEXT & PRECEDENCE

In Virginia's Fairfax County, Robbing Banks for the CIA. In a white-walled interrogation room in a small Virginia police station last June, two detectives were trying to get Herson Torres to crack. Surveillance video tied him to two attempted bank robberies in the area during the past week. The skinny 21-year-old didn't have a criminal record and seemed nervous, but he wasn't talking. The detectives showed him pictures of his brother and father. They told Torres he could be sent to prison for as many as 25 years. 

"If I tell you, you're not going to believe me," Torres said. He was crying as he told them an incredible story about being recruited by the Defense Intelligence Agency to participate in a secret operation testing the security of Washington-area banks. He said he'd been assigned to rob a half-dozen banks over four days. And he told them about Theo, the man who hired him and gave all the orders - even though Torres had never met him.

Angry, his interrogators accused him of making up a ridiculous story. Still, Torres persuaded them to look at the text and e-mail messages on his cell phone; he also gave them the password to his Facebook (FB) account and urged them to retrieve a copy of the Defense Intelligence Agency immunity letter from his glove compartment. The police locked up Torres on a charge of attempted robbery and examined the evidence. By the end of the night, they weren't sure what was going on, but they suspected Torres might be telling the truth. [Read more: Schoenberg/Bloomberg/18April2013]

Pentagon's Spies Want to Upgrade Their Secured Cellphones. The Pentagon has big plans for its spy agency. But first it's going to upgrade its secret agents' cellphones.

That's the gist of a recent request for information from the cryptic Virginia Contracting Activity (or VACA), the public face for the Defense Intelligence Agency's secretive contract business. According to the request, the DIA is looking for a company with the "ability to work and store classified information at the SECRET Collateral Level" to design custom "cellular phone point-to-point communication systems." In other words, a private communications link.

It even sounds like the DIA wants someone to build it a bespoke cellphone. This is not for certain, as the request uses broad language. The agency states the contractor must be proficient in designing "custom packaging and advanced miniaturization for communications" - in addition to a "high level of proficiency programming and testing cell phones."

Among other specifics, the designers will need to have "a high level of proficiency in the manufacturing and production of custom transmit systems" from the design and integration stage to programming the firmware. The DIA also expects industry to develop and deploy a "functional prototype and operational evaluation," and to eventually train people how to use the tool for operations. An addendum to the solicitation is classified, but the agency says it expects to award a multi-million-dollar, three-year contract sometime in the fall for the project.

The "cellular communications capabilities" are "for intelligence," the request notes vaguely. [Read more: Beckhusen/Wired/19April2013]

Ana Montes Did Much Harm Spying for Cuba. Chances Are, You Haven't Heard of Her. Ana Montes has been locked up for a decade with some of the most frightening women in America. Once a highly decorated U.S. intelligence analyst with a two-bedroom co-op in Cleveland Park, Montes today lives in a two-bunk cell in the highest-security women's prison in the nation. Her neighbors have included a former homemaker who strangled a pregnant woman to get her baby, a longtime nurse who killed four patients with massive injections of adrenaline, and Lynette "Squeaky" Fromme, the Charles Manson groupie who tried to assassinate President Ford.

But hard time in the Lizzie Borden ward of a Texas prison hasn't softened the former Defense Department wunderkind. Years after she was caught spying for Cuba, Montes remains defiant. "Prison is one of the last places I would have ever chosen to be in, but some things in life are worth going to prison for," Montes writes in a 14-page handwritten letter to a relative. "Or worth doing and then killing yourself before you have to spend too much time in prison."

Like Aldrich Ames and Robert Hanssen before her, Ana Montes blindsided the intelligence community with brazen acts of treason. By day, she was a buttoned-down GS-14 in a Defense Intelligence Agency cubicle. By night, she was on the clock for Fidel Castro, listening to coded messages over shortwave radio, passing encrypted files to handlers in crowded restaurants and slipping undetected into Cuba wearing a wig and clutching a phony passport.

Montes spied for 17 years, patiently, methodically. She passed along so many secrets about her colleagues - and the advanced eavesdropping platforms that American spooks had covertly installed in Cuba - that intelligence experts consider her among the most harmful spies in recent memory. But Montes, now 56, did not deceive just her nation and her colleagues. She also betrayed her brother Tito, an FBI special agent; her former boyfriend Roger Corneretto, an intelligence officer for the Pentagon specializing in Cuba; and her sister, Lucy, a 28-year veteran of the FBI who has won awards for helping to unmask Cuban spies. [Read more: Popkin/WashingtonPost/18April2013]

Opa-locka Field was once the Site of Secret CIA Base. All that remains of the secret CIA base is a grassy field on the northeastern corner of Opa-locka Airport.

But 60 years ago on that very spot was Building 67, a two-story barracks, that in 1953 and 1954 served as CIA field headquarters for the covert operation that overthrew leftist Guatemalan President Jacobo Arbenz.

It was there that several senior CIA officers labored for months organizing the intricate logistical details of PBSUCCESS, the code name for the anti-Arbenz operation. Among the officers who worked at Building 67 was E. Howard Hunt, who later went on to help engineer the 1972 Watergate burglary as one of the White House plumbers.

What happened at Building 67 was known at the time only to a very small circle of people, but the impact of the 1953-54 operation dramatically altered the history of South Florida and the United States.

The Guatemala operation set in motion a series of events whose reverberations continue to be felt to this day.

Arbenz's overthrow emboldened the CIA's clandestine service to try a similar operation, though on a larger scale, at Cuba's Bay of Pigs.

But the 1961 exile invasion, which ended in defeat, caused Fidel Castro a year later to accept Soviet nuclear missiles as a deterrent against future U.S.-backed invasions. Castro's subsequent consolidation of power led to a stream of refugees that continues to this day. [Read more: Chardy/MiamiHerald/20April2013]

Tibet: The CIA's Cancelled War. For much of the past century, US relations with Tibet have been characterized by kowtowing to the Chinese and hollow good wishes for the Dalai Lama. As early as 1908, William Rockhill, a US diplomat, advised the Thirteenth Dalai Lama that "close and friendly relations with China are absolutely necessary, for Tibet is and must remain a portion of the Ta Ts'ing [Manchu] Empire for its own good." Not much has changed with the Fourteenth Dalai Lama one hundred years later. After a meeting in 2011 with President Obama in the White House Map Room - the Oval Office being too official - the Dalai Lama was ushered out the back door, past the garbage cans. All this, of course, is intended to avoid condemnation from Beijing, which regards even the mildest criticism of its Tibet policy as "interference."

However there was one dramatic departure from the minimalist approach. For nearly two decades after the 1950 Chinese takeover of Tibet, the CIA ran a covert operation designed to train Tibetan insurgents and gather intelligence about the Chinese, as part of its efforts to contain the spread of communism around the world. Though little known today, the program produced at least one spectacular intelligence coup and provided a source of support for the Dalai Lama. On the eve of Richard Nixon's historic 1972 meeting with Mao, the program was abruptly cancelled, thus returning the US to its traditional arms-length policy toward Tibet. But this did not end the long legacy of mistrust that continues to color Chinese-American relations. Not only was the Chinese government aware of the CIA program; in 1992 it published a white paper on the subject. The paper included information drawn from reliable Western sources about the agency's activities, but laid the primary blame for the insurgency on the "Dalai Lama clique," a phrase Beijing still uses today. [Read more: Mirsky/NYR/9April2013]

How The US Built Its Super-Secret Spy Satellite Program. Ethics aside, espionage is an indispensable part of statecraft. The Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) information gathered helps steer national policy decisions for everything from mundane trade negotiations to the blackest of ops.

And nowhere is this more evident than in the development of the US spy satellite fleet during the Cold War. These orbital telescopes granted an unprecedented peek over the Iron Curtain - revealing Soviet military capabilities, supply reserves, industrial sites and more - that no ground-based spook could hope to provide.

During the Cold War, accurately ascertaining the USSR's military capabilities was a top US priority - as well it should have been given that we had as many as 21,000 nuclear warheads pointed at each other during that time. And while we had plenty of spies operating in Moscow, the view from overhead provided the President and his cabinet key insights into the extent of Soviet strategic capabilities which influenced defence planning and arms control negotiations. As such, the US invested vast sums of money into high-altitude research - from early "weather balloons" to the SR-71 Blackbird and U2 Dragon Lady to orbital telescopes - and established not one but three Federal agencies - the National Reconnaissance Office (NRO), the National Security Agency (NSA), and the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) - all in an effort to glean any speck of information that could give us an advantage.

Satellite technology is, by far, the most expensive ISR method at the US's disposal but also the most effective, its results well worth the billions of dollars spent. [Read more: Tarantolo/Gizmodo/24April2013]

Intelligence Lessons From the Boston Attacks. Last week's attack at the Boston Marathon, like the attempted car bombing of Times Square almost three years ago, shows that the line between local conflicts and global ones has become thinner. Faisal Shahzad, the would-be terrorist in 2010, had legally lived in the United States for seven years and had earned citizenship the year before hatching his plot. He would later say that he was inspired to carry out the attack by the radical Yemeni cleric Anwar al-Awlaki, but the United States discovered that the plot had, in fact, been organized and possibly financed by an extremist group called the Tehrik-i-Taliban Pakistan (TTP), which usually targets the Pakistani state and military. The organization's attempt to strike in the United States showed that its own distinction between the near and far enemy had become increasingly blurred.

Like Shahzad, the Boston suspects were in the United States legally. In some accounts, the older of the two brothers, Tamerlan Tsarnaev, developed radical ideas in the United States before traveling to Dagestan to visit family. In other accounts, he got his training abroad. None of the stories has a definitive answer for whether his underlying complaint was religious, political, or ethnic. It might, in fact, have been a combination of all three. There is no shortage of grievances that a young Chechen might have, nor of groups willing to exploit them. Organizations of Chechen separatists, which are largely Muslim, have fought against the Russian Federation since the end of the Cold War. The Caucasus Emirate, the largest group, denied any involvement in the bombing. Meanwhile, al Qaeda has often referenced Central Asia as an important theater for jihad. By most accounts, moreover, there were Chechens training in al Qaeda camps during the 1990s.

The United States has mostly focused on the terrorism challenge as it relates to al Qaeda, but that group is only one in a world marked by increasing sectarianism and in which diaspora communities can develop much closer connections to their home countries than they did in the past. [Read more: Helfstein/ForeignAffairs/23April2013]


Section III - COMMENTARY

The CIA and the Cloud. If your company mistrusts the security of the cloud, it might want to take a look at what The Company is doing.

"The Company" is a term that insiders have long used to refer to the CIA. Is there any organization that takes security more seriously? Perhaps, but probably not within the Fortune 500. And yet the CIA appears to be moving to the cloud.

Seriously. According to FCW, a publication that tracks the intersection of government and technology, the CIA has agreed to a cloud computing contract with Amazon that may be worth up to $600 million over 10 years. Specifically, Amazon Web Services will help the intelligence agency build a private cloud infrastructure.

What? You expected the CIA to put its secrets on the Amazon EC2? I don't think so!

But get this: One reason the CIA started moving to cloud-based computing in 2009 was that it saw the cloud as being more secure than conventional IT systems. Back then, Jill Tummler Singer, who was the CIA's deputy CIO at the time, said, "By keeping the cloud inside your firewalls, you can focus your strongest intrusion-detection and -prevention sensors on your perimeter, thus gaining significant advantage over the most common attack vector -- the Internet." [Read more: Vaughan-Nicols/Computerworld/22April2013]

Should CIA be Targeting Terrorists? On a hot summer day in early August, 2008, the secure Red Switch phone in my office at CIA was lighting up with calls from National Security Adviser Steve Hadley.

The Russian Army had invaded the Republic of Georgia in the Caucasus mountain region. Georgian President Mikheil Saakashvili was frantic about his country's safety and desperate for information on Russian forces and Russia's intent.

I promised Steve some answers, hung up the phone and walked to my outer office to direct my executive assistants to "get our Georgia people up here right away." As they busily dialed phones and typed e-mails, I remember turning to my chief of staff and only half jokingly asking him, "We've got Georgia people, right?"

I recall that day now as a debate has begun about the focus of the American intelligence community and especially of the CIA. In discussing his new book, The Way of the Knife, New York Times national security correspondent Mark Mazzetti suggests that CIA's obsession with fighting terrorism might have blinded it to the inevitability, imminence and rapid spread of the Arab Awakening.

In March, press reports said the President's Intelligence Advisory Board, a panel of senior outside advisers, had come to much the same conclusion, accusing the intelligence community of too much focus on military operations and drone strikes at the expense of other targets such as China and the Middle East.

Back in August 2008, we did indeed have "Georgia people," and they were quite good. Within a few days, the entire team was gathered around a conference table at CIA headquarters giving President George W. Bush their personal appreciation of the situation.

But precise tactical intelligence was hard to come by (questions such as where exactly was the front line of Russian troops). [Read more/Hayden/CNN/18April2013]

The Bay of Pigs - An Anniversary of Heroism and Shame. "Wimps," sneers Michael Moore in his book Downsize This, referring to men (and boys, some as young as 16) who 52 years ago this week hit a Cuban beach now known as the Bay of Pigs. "Really just a bunch of wimps. That's right, wimps - and crybabies too," sneers Moore. "Ex-Cubans with a yellow stripe down their backs."

"They fought magnificently", testified a better judge of combat conduct (we're guessing) than Michael Moore. I refer to U.S. Marine Colonel Hack Hawkins, who helped train the Cuban freedom fighters and (heart-brokenly) assessed the battle. Colonel Hawkins was flagged with medals for heroism at Corregidor, Iwo Jima, and Inchon. "They [the Cuban-freedom fighters] simply ran out of the ammunition and supplies their sponsor, the U.S., had promised them," continued the Marine Colonel. "They had no choice but to surrender. We abandoned them."

"They fought like tigers," wrote a CIA officer who helped also trained these Cuban freedom-fighters, and actually hit the beach alongside them. "But their fight was doomed before the first man hit the beach."

That CIA man, Grayston Lynch, also knew a bit more about combat than did Michael Moore (we're guessing). He carried scars from Omaha Beach, The Battle of the Bulge and Korea's Heartbreak Ridge. But in those battles, Lynch and his band of brothers could count on the support of their own chief executive. [Read more: Fontova/TownHall/17April2013]


Section IV - Jobs, Books, Research Requests and Coming Events
 [IMPORTANT: AFIO does not "vet" or endorse these research inquiries or job offers. Reasonable-sounding inquiries and career offerings are published as a service to our members, and for researchers, educators, and subscribers. You are urged to exercise your usual caution and good judgment when responding or supplying any information.]


Jobs
 [IMPORTANT: AFIO does not "vet" or endorse these research inquiries or job offers. Reasonable-sounding inquiries and career offerings are published as a service to our members, and for researchers, educators, and subscribers. You are urged to exercise your usual caution and good judgment when responding or supplying any information.]

SENIOR INVESTIGATOR sought by Chicago Firm

The Vander Weele GroupLLC  is a Chicago professional services firm that provides complex fraud investigations, due diligence and compliance monitoring. We seek to create a pool of highly experienced contract associates to provide highly sensitive corporate investigations. Former federal law enforcement experience, combined with expertise in the corporate world, desired.

Associate Tasks: Collect and analyze complex contract documentation; Apply standards of evidence and preserve evidence related to internal investigations of employee and vendor misconduct; Conduct detailed investigative interviews, building rapport with potentially reluctant witnesses; Understand accounting, procurement and finance processes relevant to investigations and common fraud schemes; Interact with clients, witnesses and subjects in a highly professional, objective manner; Understand and map complex procurement and business processes; Track case activity and organize case files; Write well-structured, objective, and thorough investigative reports, free from errors; Assist with other firm tasks, as needed.

Desired Qualifications: Previous prosecutorial experience in the U.S. Attorney's Office or previous investigative experience in the U.S. Postal Inspection Service, Securities and Exchange Commission, Naval or Army Intelligence Investigative Service, or Federal Bureau of Investigation. Must be extremely detailed oriented, analytical, organized and open to an environment that provides continual learning. Must have excellent verbal and written communication skills. Must have high integrity and be trustworthy. Must have keen interest in business and organizational dynamics. Must have demonstrated proficiency in typing and technology. Compensation is dependent upon experience.
To apply, submit resume tomaribeth@vanderweelegroup.com. Vander Weele GroupLLC is located at 2258 N. Kimball Ave, Chicago, IL 60647. Call them at 773-929-3030.

Books

The OSS in Burma: Jungle War Against the Japanese. "One could not choose a worse place for fighting the Japanese," said Winston Churchill of North Burma, deeming it "the most forbidding fighting country imaginable." But it was here that the fledgling Office of Strategic Services conducted its most successful combat operations of World War II. Troy Sacquety takes readers into Burma's steaming jungles in the first book to fully cover the exploits and contributions of the OSS's Detachment 101 against the Japanese Imperial Army.

Functioning independently of both the U.S. Army and OSS headquarters - and with no operational or organizational model to follow - Detachment 101 was given enormous latitude in terms of developing its mission and methods. It grew from an inexperienced and poorly supported group of 21 agents training on the job in a lethal environment to a powerful force encompassing 10,000 guerrillas (spread across as many as 8 battalions), 60 long-range agents, and 400 short-range agents. By April 1945, it remained the only American ground force in North Burma while simultaneously conducting daring amphibious operations that contributed to the liberation of Rangoon.

With unrivalled access to OSS archives, Sacquety vividly recounts the 101's story with a depth of detail that makes the disease-plagued and monsoon-drenched Burmese theater come unnervingly alive. He describes the organizational evolution of Detachment 101 and shows how the unit's flexibility allowed it to evolve to meet the changing battlefield environment. He depicts the Detachment's two sharply contrasting field commanders: headstrong Colonel Carl Eifler, who pushed the unit beyond its capabilities, and the more measured Colonel William Peers, who molded it into a model special operations force. He also highlights the heroic Kachin tribesmen, fierce fighters defending their tribal homeland and instrumental in acclimating the Americans to terrain, weather, and cultures in ways that were vital to the success of the Detachment's operations. [Read more: KansasPress/April2013]

The Cambodian Wars: Clashing Armies and CIA Covert Operations. For most Americans, Cambodia was a sideshow to the war in Vietnam, but by the time of the Vietnam invasion of Democratic Kampuchea in 1978 and the subsequent war, it had finally moved to center stage. Kenneth Conboy chronicles the violence that plagued Cambodia from World War II until the end of the twentieth century and peels back the layers of secrecy that surrounded the CIA's covert assistance to anticommunist forces in Cambodia during that span.

Conboy's path-breaking study provides the first complete assessment of CIA ops in two key periods - during the Khmer Republic's existence (1970 - 1975), in support of American military action in Vietnam, and during the Reagan and first Bush presidencies (1981 - 1991), when the CIA challenged Soviet expansion by supporting exiled royalists, Republicans, and even former Communists trying to expel the Vietnamese from their country. Through interviews with dozens of CIA Cambodia veterans - as well as special forces officers from Singapore, Thailand, Malaysia, and Australia - he sheds new light on the contributions made by foreign intelligence services. Through information gleaned from the U.S. Defense Attache's Office in Phnom Penh, he offers a detailed look at the development of the Khmer Rouge military structure, while his use of Vietnamese-language histories released by the People's Army of Vietnam helps more fully illuminate the PAVN's participation in the Cambodian wars.

More than a simple exposé of CIA activities, however, The Cambodian Wars is also an authoritative history of that country's struggles over half a century. Conboy examines Cambodia as kingdom, colony, republic, revolutionary state, and Vietnamese satellite, and offers fresh insight into the actions of key players - Norodom Sihanouk, Lon Nol, Sisowath Sirik Matak, Son Ngoc Thanh, and others - that will enlighten even those who think they know that country's history. [Read more: KansasPress/June2013]


Research Requests

 [IMPORTANT: AFIO does not "vet" or endorse these research inquiries or job offers. Reasonable-sounding inquiries and career offerings are published as a service to our members, and for researchers, educators, and subscribers. You are urged to exercise your usual caution and good judgment when responding or supplying any information.]

Working on Biography of Sherman Kent. For a biography of Sherman Kent as intelligence officer, I would appreciate hearing from anyone who worked with Kent or know where I can find the papers of Louis Becker, Robert Amory, Ray Cline, R. Jack Smith, and any others who might have offered opinions on Kent's personality, his role in CIA, and opinions on his style and influence. I have reviewed Kent's papers at Yale and the declassified work he did after retiring along with Hal Ford and Jack Davis' published material. Please respond to Michael Douglas Smith at quiller1947@comcast.net.

Thanks, Michael Douglas Smith, CIA retired


Coming Educational Events

EDUCATIONAL EVENTS IN COMING TWO MONTHS....

MANY Spy Museum Events in 2013 with full details are listed on the AFIO Website at www.afio.com. The titles for some of these are in detail below and online.

25 April 2013, 11:30 am - San Francisco, CA - The AFIO Jim Quesada Chapter hosts SAC David J. Johnson, FBI San Francisco Division on Transformation of the Bureau.

Topic: "The Continuing Transformation of the FBI" with speaker SAC David J. Johnson, FBI SF Division. Meeting starts at noon.
Location: United Irish Cultural Center, 2700 45th Avenue, SF (between Sloat/Wawona). E-mail RSVP to Mariko Kawaguchi at afiosf@aol.com and mail a check made out to "AFIO" to: Mariko Kawaguchi, PO Box 117578, Burlingame, CA 94011. Members and students: $25; non-members $35

Saturday, 4 May 2013, 1130 am – Indian Harbour Beach, FL - "My Life in the CIA" with Richard Holm at Meeting/Luncheon by AFIO Florida Satellite Chapter

Richard Holm, a former paramilitary adviser, decorated operations officer, senior manager and station chief for the Central Intelligence Agency, will share fascinating stories of his experiences during the Cold War. Drawing from the material he used in writing his book, The Craft We Chose: My Life in the CIA, he will recount highlights of his 35-year Agency career and explain why it is imperative for Americans to understand and support what the CIA does--a goal that also underlies AFIO's efforts to raise public awareness of the importance of national intelligence. He will also touch on the impact of an intelligence career on one's family and family life. POC: Bobbie Keith, bobbie6769@juno.com, 321.777.5561

Wednesday, 8 May 2013, 6 - 9 pm - Scottsdale, AZ - 1st Annual 007 "End of Season" Dinner

In lieu of lunch, this season's LAST regular monthly Arizona Chapter meeting will be held Wednesday, May 8th, from 6pm to 9pm.
It will be our First annual 007 event, to include cocktail attire and entertainment: Spy stories by many of our esteemed members; "Shaken not Stirred" Martini & Cash Bar; Sit down dinner (prime rib or salmon filet)
"Bond Girls" in attendance; Silver Aston Martin (without machine guns mounted) in the drive! All at McCormick Ranch Golf Club!
Please make your reservations BY MAY 1st, 2013 (Spouses, friends, and spy enthusiasts welcome since attendance IS limited to approximately 100 people!)
RSVP to Simone Lopes <simone@4smartphone.net>

Wednesday, 8 May 2013, noon - Washington, DC - Global Terrorism, Espionage and Cybersecurity Monthly Update featuring David Major, at the International Spy Museum

Presented in partnership with the CI Centre, these monthly briefings will provide you with the opportunity to be the first to learn of the most current worldwide happenings in the field of intelligence and terrorism. Drawn from the Centre's SPYPEDIA®, the most comprehensive source of espionage information in the world, each Update will cover important events and information which may not be reported by mainstream media outlets. Such as: espionage penetrations and arrests, cyber espionage reporting, and terrorist events. Briefings led by CI Centre founder David Major will include trend analysis and coverage of new emerging issues of value to the intelligence and security professional and individuals with an interest in national security matters. Major will also highlight and review, as appropriate, new books and reports to keep you current with breaking developments in the national security arena.
Tickets: Free! No registration required. Further information at www.spymuseum.org

Friday, 10 May 2013, 10:30 am - 2 pm - Tysons Corner, VA - David Shedd, DD/DIA, and Col. John B. Alexander, PhD.

AFIO National Spring Luncheon features Deputy Director David R. Shedd, Defense Intelligence Agency. The morning speaker is Col. John B. Alexander, PhD on UFOs and the Intelligence Community. Alexander, Senior Fellow with the Joint Special Operations University; Former Green Beret Commander, Los Alamos Project Director, recently released a book: UFOs: Myths, Conspiracies and Realities. Register now.

Saturday, 11 May 2013, 11am - 3pm - Orange Park, FL - AFIO North Florida Chapter hosts J. Perry Smith, former CIA and FBI Executive

We have a most unique guest speaker for the occasion, J. Perry Smith, who is currently serving as Canon Pastor at St. John's Cathedral in Jacksonville. But that's just the tip of the iceberg of a most unusual and diverse career. He was born in Knoxville, Tennessee in 1944, but spent his early childhood in West Virginia and California.
In the early 1960s, he tried his hand at bullfighting in Mexico, life as a Trappist monk at The Abbey of Gethsemani near Bardstown, Kentucky, with Thomas Merton, and in 1967-68, he went to war in Vietnam. Perry did what few people have ever done. He was a CIA field operative for eight years, then left the agency and ultimately became a senior executive FBI Agent. His CIA story will appeal to those interested in an insider's perspective, spy versus spy, set mostly in Mexico, Central America and Europe during the Cold War. His 22 years of experience as an FBI Agent give a rare opportunity to see how one of the world's most secretive organizations actually operates. Then, even more rare, he became an Episcopal priest. On September 11, 2001, Perry Smith was reading in the courtyard at the Virginia Theological Seminary when he heard an explosion and felt the ground shake. Just eleven days earlier he had retired from the FBI. The antiterrorism unit had been his last assignment. Now he was studying to become an Episcopal priest. Perry lived in Spain and Latin America for many years and is an enthusiastic Hispanist, fluent in Spanish and a frequent traveler to Spain. Incidentally, he will be bringing copies of his book The Unlikely Priest to the meeting if you are interested in purchasing one.
Location: Country Club of Orange Park. RSVP to qbegonia@comcast.net
Cost will be $16 each, pay the Country Club at the luncheon.

13 May 2013, noon - Washington, DC - The OSS in Burma: Jungle War Against the Japanese at the International Spy Museum

"One could not choose a worse place for fighting the Japanese," said Winston Churchill of northern Burma, but it was there that the fledgling Office of Strategic Services conducted its most successful combat operations of World War II. Troy Sacquety, a historian for the US Army's Special Operations Command, ventures into Burma's steaming jungles in the first book to fully cover the exploits and contributions of the OSS's Detachment 101 against the Japanese Imperial Army. In this talk, Sacquety will describe how Detachment 101 succeeded and created a prototype for today's Special Forces.
Join the author for an informal chat and book signing. For more information please visit: www.spymuseum.org

Tuesday, 14 May 2013, 4:30 - 6 pm - New York, NY - "The Law of Counterterrorism & Related Issues" conference and Roundtable Discussion on The Law of Counterterrorism

A timely event co-Sponsored by the ABA Section of Administrative Law & Regulatory Practice and The Council on Intelligence Issues
Expert authors from the landmark ABA book The Law of Counterterrorism will discuss areas examined in detail in the book, such as key legal issues regarding the law of war as it pertains to detention, interrogation, and combatants; criminal jurisdiction and military commissions; the leading role of the NYPD in combating terrorism; the organization, structure, and authorities of the intelligence community; the PATRIOT Act and the IRTPA; implications of advice of counsel in controversial cases in the war on terror; and more. Reception Follows the event.
Distinguished Speakers: • New York City Police Commissioner Raymond W. Kelly; • John D. Altenburg, Jr., Maj. Gen., U.S. Army, ret., Principal, Greenberg Traurig LLP; • Karen J. Greenberg, Director, Center for National Security, Fordham Law School; • Richard B. (Dick) Jackson, Col., U.S. Army, ret., Law of War Advisor to Judge Advocate General, U.S. Army; • W. George Jameson, former Senior Counsel, CIA; • Lynne K. Zusman, Editor, ABA Administrative Law Section Fellow. Event is being hosted by O'Melveny & Myers LLP, Times Square Tower, 30th Floor, 7 Times Square, NY 10036 (212) 326-2000. Reception follows the event. Due to building security policy, guests will have to register using a photo ID at security on the ground floor. Please allow extra time to complete this process.
Cancellation: Cancellations accepted until May 7, 2013. Substitutions are encouraged. E-mail Angela.Petro@americanbar.org or Fax request to 202-662-1529.
Payment: There is no charge for this program, however space is limited and advance registration is required. Return this form by EMAIL: angela.petro@americanbar.org OR FAX: 202.662.1529 OR MAIL: Angela Petro, ABA Section of Administrative Law, 740 15th Street NW, Washington, DC 20005.
CLE: There is NO CLE Credit available for this program.
Special Needs: Please contact Angela Petro at 202-662-1582 or angela.petro@americanbar.org to request accommodation for any special needs no later than May 7, 2013.

Thursday, 16 May 2013 - Denver, CO - The AFIO Rocky Mountain Chapter visits the Disaster Management Institute's "Center for Simulation"

The Institute's Center is located at 9235 E 10th Dr, Building 859 Room 911, Denver, CO. This is a joint meeting of the AFIO and Denver INFRAGARD. There are seating limitations of 45 seats so we will accept reservations on a first come first serve basis. There will be no lunch at this facility... it will be lunch on your own outside the Center for Simulation, since they have no cafeteria. The Center for Simulation is the first of its kind in the world for training and preparing first responders in full immersion learning environments. Since its inception in 2005 the center has grown to include a complete home, bar, street scene, hazardous material/refinery, hoarder house, underground space and the Disaster Management Institute (DMI). The DMI is a state of the art emergency operations center with multiple cable and satellite feeds, Web-EOC, smart boards, a star board, video cubes and a touch table. Each space has multiple cameras and global sound. Every training is recorded and a DVD can be created live or the video feeds can be stored on servers for playback options. Currently the Center and DMI have active training relationships with working professionals from local, state, federal and Department of Defense assets in addition to students from several educational institutions. You will receive directions when you RSVP to Warren Gerig at warren@asia.com.

16 May 2013, 12.30-2.30 PM - Los Angeles, CA - AFIO LA Chapter hears Dr. Fadi Essmaeel of US Congress on Homeland Security & Emergency Management challenges in Southern California and the evolving role of intelligence

Dr. Fadi Essmaeel from the U.S. Congress will be addressing the AFIO L.A. Chapter on the topic of Homeland Security & Emergency Management challenges in Southern California and the evolving role of intelligence. Meeting Location: LAPD Ahmanson Training Center RM 1G 5651 W. Manchester Blvd. • Los Angeles, CA 90045
Please RSVP for your attendance and access to the facility: AFIO_LA@yahoo.com
Dr. Fadi Essmaeel serves as HS Director for US Congressman Dana Rohrabacher of the CA-48th District and as Chairman, of the Training and Exercise Subcommittee of the Central CA Area Maritime Security Committee. He is a physician, former officer with the IDF and a human rights activist. As first responder and incident commander he handled numerous incidents that took place against the backdrop of key historical landmarks such as the South-Lebanon conflict, the Israeli-Palestinian peace process and the ensuing waves of violence. For 13 years, Dr. Essmaeel has offered free-of-charge educational programs for HS/EM officials resulting in delivery of more than a 100,000 professional training hours in myriad subjects. Trainees represent all government jurisdictions and a wide variety of private sector industries. During the early 2000's he also initiated an ongoing nation-wide digital information-sharing campaign during which terabytes of information have already been disseminated including: manuals, handbooks, guidelines, best practices, procedures, training materials, course calendars etc. Central to his duties, he facilitates trouble-shooting for response-agencies as they interact with the federal government and has supervised more than 2000 constituent-cases with HHS/DoD/DHS/DOJ. Dr. Essmaeel voluntarily mentors and tutors first responders and their training managers in diverse jurisdictions across the United States. He operates the SOCAL Training and Knowledge Network (STAK-Net) service for HS/EM.

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31 May 2013, 7 pm - Washington, DC - The ESP in Espionage: An Evening with Alain Nu, The Man Who Knows - at the International Spy Museum

When the US government began their Star Gate program in the 1970s, they were focused on the possibility of using psychic channels to gather intelligence. Psychics, in a clinically controlled setting, were asked to perform "remote viewing"—attempting to sense targeted information about people, places, and events. Reports of the program's success run from the eerie to the off-base, but the intelligence world's pursuit of the mind's power has captured the imagination of Alain Nu. The Man Who Knows™ has long been obsessed with the strange, the unknown, and unexplained. His exploration of the unusual has led him to the field of mentalism and developing his untold powers. Nu's uncanny demonstrations blur the line between science and the mysteries of unexplained phenomena and have been featured in his own TLC Network television specials The Mysterious World of Alain Nu and his book Picture Your ESP!Now he is turning his ESPecially entertaining powers to the world of ESPionage. Join us for an evening with Nu inspired by Star Gate, the trickery of spies, and other top secret projects. Complimentary light hors d'oeuvres and a cash bar.
For more information or to purchase tickets please visit: www.spymuseum.org

31 May - 12 June 2013 - NYC to England - "The Spying Game: The Cold War and Cambridge" aboard the Queen Mary 2, with Intelligence Expert Nigel West

Immerse yourself in the shadowy underworld of international espionage with renowned author and intelligence expert Nigel West. Learn the truth behind the acronyms of the CIA, SOE, NKVD and KGB, as well as the role of "sleeper agents," the secret VENONA project and the race for atomic power. Aboard the elite Queen Mary 2, gain intimate vantages into the post-World War II geopolitical, ideological and economic struggles that shaped the world today. Highlights • Gain expert insight into Yalta, the Manhattan Project and the greatest secret of the Cold War: VENONA. • Visit Bletchley Park, home to the Enigma machine and historic headquarters of secret British code-breaking in World War II. • At colleges associated with the Cambridge Five, learn how a group of undergraduates became a famous Soviet spy ring. Activity Notes Walking up to two miles per day. Itinerary Summary Arrival New York City, N.Y., 1 night; embark Queen Mary 2, 7 nights; disembark, Cambridge, 4 nights; departure.
For more information or to book your participation: visit www.roadscholar.org and select Program #14569

2 - 14 June 2013 - Charlottesville, VA - UVA 21st National Security Law Institute June 2013 Training Program

Each summer for the past two decades, the University of Virginia Law School's Center for National Security Law has run a highly intensive training program during the first two weeks of June. While primarily aimed at helping to prepare law professors to teach in the field, the program is also open to government lawyers from the United States and abroad. Classes are taught by some of the leading scholars and practitioners in the field, including the directors of the UVA center and of similar national security law centers at Duke and Georgetown.

The 2013 Institute will take place at the University of Virginia School of Law between June 2 and June 14. The deadline for applications is April 12, but applications may be submitted at any time before then. The $1950.00 tuition fee covers lodging during the seminar as well as books and other reading materials. Participants are responsible for their travel to and from Charlottesville and meals other than lunches during the two-week period.

Whether you are new to the field and need a broad overview of some of the most important issues, or are looking to update your expertise and take advantage of the networking opportunities the Institute offers, you will find it both an enjoyable and a rewarding educational experience. Further information on the Institute may be found at http://www.virginia.edu/cnsl/nsli.html, and questions about the Institute may be submitted by email to Professor Robert (Bob) F. Turner rft3m@virginia.edu or by phone to (434) 924-4083

Wednesday, 05 June 2013, noon - Washington, DC - "Global Terrorism, Espionage, and Cybersecurity Monthly Update," at the International Spy Museum

This noontime, no cost presentation is done in partnership with the CI Centre, to provide an opportunity to be the first to learn of the most current worldwide happenings in the field of intelligence and terrorism. Drawn from the Centre’s SPYPEDIA®, the most comprehensive source of espionage information in the world. Each update covers important events and information which may not be reported by mainstream media outlets; such as, espionage penetrations and arrests, cyber espionage reporting, and terrorist events. Briefings led by CI Centre founder David Major will include trend analysis and coverage of new emerging issues of value to the intelligence and security professional and individuals with an interest in national security matters. Major will also highlight and review, as appropriate, new books and reports to keep you current with breaking developments in the national security arena. Tickets: Free! No registration required. See www.spymuseum.org

12 June 2013, 6:30 pm - Washington, DC - Wallis Simpson, Duchess of Windsor: Nazi Spy? at the International Spy Museum

When King Edward VIII abdicated the English thrown in December 1936 to marry Wallis Simpson, the world was agog. And many feared the political implications of a former king on the loose. What would these notorious lovers do? Would they attempt to influence world affairs? It seemed that the worst nightmare of many observers was coming to pass when photos of the two gleefully gladhanding Hitler appeared in 1937. During World War II, the former King was given governorship of the Bahamas—a post that those in-the-know rightly considered a form of exile. But just how dangerous were they? Amanda A. Ohlke, Adult Education Director at the International Spy Museum, will overview the most serious accusations and credit or debunk them. Much is made of secret files and gossip, but this June, the 76th anniversary of their controversial marriage, find out the truth about Wallis and Edward. After the presentation, toast the famed couple's marriage with some bubbly and trade a quip with the Baltimore-born Duchess. The Duchess, as brought to life by historical enactor Emily Lapisardi, will answer to some of the most heinous accusations in the spirit of Mrs. Simpson.
Space is limited – advance registration required! For more information or to purchase tickets please visit: www.spymuseum.org

14 June 2013, 6:30 pm - Washington, DC - Surveillance 201 with Eric O'Neill - Spy School Workshop at the International Spy Museum

What if you were assigned to watch the most damaging spy in US history? As a young operative in the FBI, Eric O'Neill was put into position as Robert Hanssen's assistant with the secret task of spying on his boss, who was under suspicion of working for Russia. O'Neill's background with the FBI was in surveillance, so he was up to the challenge. O'Neill has run some previous recruits through a surveillance basics course, and now he's ready to take those with the expertise to the next level. This advanced small group surveillance exercise is best suited to those who already know how to track the "Rabbit" without being "made." O'Neill will rate your clandestine prowess while you spy on secret meetings and operational acts and see if you can uncover the spy skullduggery that's afoot while you are on foot. There is no guarantee that your "Rabbit" won't escape!
Space is limited to only 10 participants – advance registration required! For more information or to purchase tickets please visit: www.spymuseum.org

Saturday 22 June 2013 - Milford, MA - AFIO New England Chapter hosts their Summer Meeting

Speaker TBD. Location: Courtyard by Marriott in Milford, Mass. Hotel website is here.
Schedule: Registration & gathering, 1000 – 1130, Membership meeting 1130 – 1200; Luncheon at 1200 followed by keynote speaker; Adjournment at 2:30PM.
Questions to afionechapter@gmail.com

For Additional Events two+ months or greater....view our online Calendar of Events


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