AFIO Weekly Intelligence Notes #21-13 dated 28 May 2013

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CONTENTS

Section I - INTELLIGENCE HIGHLIGHTS

Section II - CONTEXT & PRECEDENCE

Section III - COMMENTARY

Section IV - Books and Television, and Coming Events

Books and Television

Coming Educational Events

Current Calendar New and/or Next Two Months ONLY

 

Important Upcoming Events ...

7-10 July 2013 - Dungarvan, Ireland
3rd Annual Global Intelligence Forum

"Preparing Intelligence Analysts for the 21st Century"

Hosted by Mercyhurst University

Join us in Dungarvan, Ireland for a very special worldwide gathering of intelligence professionals, academics, and decision makers.
Preparing Intelligence Analysts for the 21st Century is the theme of the conference. The Global Forum continues down the path of intelligence innovation and discovery we embarked on in July 2010. Then, we began by exploring the nature of analysis and its application in various intelligence professions. Later, in 2011, we discussed the interaction between the intelligence analyst/practitioner and the decision-maker. In July 2013 we hope to continue to build bridges between practitioners and scholars within intelligence related professions, and discuss emerging 21st century intelligence best practices.
This year's forum will center on the greater shift the intelligence analysis field must make to account for a changing world. Panelists and contributors from the national security, law enforcement, business and academic communities will discuss the emerging trends and the necessary steps intelligence practitioners must take to address 21st century problems.
View the agenda here,
check out our current speaker list,
view the website,
and most importantly REGISTER here to join us!


2 - 14 June 2013 - Charlottesville, VA - UVA 21st National Security Law Institute June 2013 Training Program

Each summer for the past two decades, the University of Virginia Law School's Center for National Security Law has run a highly intensive training program during the first two weeks of June. While primarily aimed at helping to prepare law professors to teach in the field, the program is also open to government lawyers from the United States and abroad. Classes are taught by some of the leading scholars and practitioners in the field, including the directors of the UVA center and of similar national security law centers at Duke and Georgetown.

The 2013 Institute will take place at the University of Virginia School of Law between June 2 and June 14. The deadline for applications is April 12, but applications may be submitted at any time before then. The $1950.00 tuition fee covers lodging during the seminar as well as books and other reading materials. Participants are responsible for their travel to and from Charlottesville and meals other than lunches during the two-week period.

Whether you are new to the field and need a broad overview of some of the most important issues, or are looking to update your expertise and take advantage of the networking opportunities the Institute offers, you will find it both an enjoyable and a rewarding educational experience. Further information on the Institute may be found at http://www.virginia.edu/cnsl/nsli.html, and questions about the Institute may be submitted by email to Professor Robert (Bob) F. Turner rft3m@virginia.edu or by phone to (434) 924-4083


Wednesday, 5 June 2013, noon - Washington, DC - "Global Terrorism, Espionage, and Cybersecurity Monthly Update," at the International Spy Museum

This noontime, no cost presentation is done in partnership with the CI Centre, to provide an opportunity to be the first to learn of the most current worldwide happenings in the field of intelligence and terrorism. Drawn from the Centre’s SPYPEDIA®, the most comprehensive source of espionage information in the world. Each update covers important events and information which may not be reported by mainstream media outlets; such as, espionage penetrations and arrests, cyber espionage reporting, and terrorist events. Briefings led by CI Centre founder David Major will include trend analysis and coverage of new emerging issues of value to the intelligence and security professional and individuals with an interest in national security matters. Major will also highlight and review, as appropriate, new books and reports to keep you current with breaking developments in the national security arena. Tickets: Free! No registration required. See www.spymuseum.org

 

 

Section I - INTELLIGENCE HIGHLIGHTS

Obama's New Drone Policy Leaves Room for CIA Role. Four years ago, as a new al-Qaeda affiliate in Yemen was proving itself a potent adversary, the Obama administration made plans to attack it with airstrikes just as the United States had been doing to the terrorist network's core in Pakistan.

But this time, the White House decided there would be a key difference: The strikes in Yemen would be carried out by the U.S. military, not the CIA.

Two years later, in mid-2011, a mysterious construction project began to emerge in the Saudi desert, an elongated compound with a ribbon of concrete running parallel to the ridgelines of the surrounding dunes. CIA drones were about to enter the skies over Yemen after all.

The change was driven by a number of factors, including errant strikes that killed the wrong people, the use of munitions that left shrapnel with U.S. military markings scattered about target sites and worries that Yemen's unstable leader might kick the Pentagon's planes out.

But President Obama's decision also came down to a determination that the CIA was simply better than the Defense Department at locating and killing al-Qaeda operatives with armed drones, according to current and former U.S. officials involved in the deliberations. [Read more: Miller/WashingtonPost/26May2013]

Law Limits Who Can Use Fake Driver's Licenses, Plates. Gov. Jay Inslee on Tuesday signed into law a measure giving legislative approval to a state program that has already issued hundreds of fake driver's licenses and license plates to law-enforcement and government agencies.

The measure limits the distribution of the undercover licenses and plates to undercover or covert officers engaged in "law-enforcement activities," and Inslee said that the law, which takes effect immediately, gives "legislative direction and parameters" on how the program can now be used.

"That is different than pre-existing law in our state, because there was no such restriction on its use," he said after the signing.

While the license-plate program had previously been codified in state law, the fake ID program has been operating without legislative approval - and in relative secrecy - for years. The Kitsap Sun and public radio's Northwest News Network reported in April that the CIA has been using the program more than any federal, state or local agency. It's unclear under the language of the new law whether the CIA could still receive licenses. [Read more: LaCorte/AP/21May2013]

UK Parliamentary Committee to Probe Intelligence Agency's Work in Light of Soldier's Brutal Murder. Britain's parliamentary intelligence committee said Tuesday it will carry out a report into whether U.K. intelligence services fell short before the killing of an off-duty British soldier in an apparent Islamic extremist attack.

Soldier Lee Rigby, 25, was murdered by two men wielding knives and meat cleavers last week near his barracks in southeast London's Woolwich area.

British officials say the two main suspects had been known to them for some time, and questions have swirled about whether authorities could have done more to prevent the killing.

Malcolm Rifkind, chair of Parliament's Intelligence and Security Committee, told the BBC on Tuesday that MI5 has pledged to cooperate as the committee tries to "get to the bottom" of the agency's work.

He said the committee will "go where the evidence takes us" and judge if there was a problem. [Read more: AP/28May2013]

Report: Plans for Australia Spy HQ Hacked by China. Australian officials on Tuesday refused to confirm or deny whether Chinese hackers had stolen the blueprints of a new spy agency headquarters as a news report claims. A tiny party essential to the ruling coalition's government demanded an inquiry into how much damage may have been done.

Australian Broadcasting Corp. television reported on Monday night that the plans for the 630 million Australian dollar ($608 million) Australian Security Intelligence Organization building had been stolen through a cyberattack on a building contractor. Blueprints that included details such as communications cabling, server locations and security systems had been traced to a Chinese server, the network reported.

Des Ball, an Australian National University cybersecurity expert, said China could use the blueprints to bug the building, which is nearing completion in Canberra, the capital, after lengthy construction delays. [Read more: McGuirk/AP/28May2013]

Navy Spy Scandal Prompted U.S. to Increase Oversight of Canadian Military Intelligence. The United States carried out a rigorous follow-up with key Canadian military intelligence centres in the wake of a navy spy scandal to ensure new, stricter security protocols had been enacted, say multiple defence and intelligence sources.

American liaison officers on both the Pacific and Atlantic coasts were asked to verify that enhanced compliance and accountability measures for the handling of shared intelligence were in place and working, said a military source.

The Harper government has acknowledged that security fixes were underway as a result of the Jeffrey Delisle case, but the scope of U.S. direction startled Wesley Wark, a visiting professor at the University of Ottawa's graduate school of public and international affairs.

"As far as I'm aware, that is the first time in the history of Canada's allied relationships on the intelligence front that we've ever been faced with that kind of stringent requirement and deadline to fix things," Wark said in an interview.

"Perhaps the Americans didn't quite trust the Canadians to come up with a sufficient security fix, sufficiently quickly." [Read more: TheStar/27May2013]

US Intelligence Embraces Debate in Security Issues. In the months leading up to the killing of Osama bin Laden, veteran intelligence analyst Robert Cardillo was given the nickname "Debbie Downer.'' With each new tidbit of information that tracked bin Laden to a high-walled compound in northern Pakistan - phone records, satellite imaging, clues from other suspects - Cardillo cast doubt that the terror network leader and mastermind was actually there.

As the world now knows well, President Barack Obama ultimately decided to launch a May 2011 raid on the Abbottabad compound that killed bin Laden. But the level of widespread skepticism that Cardillo shared with other top-level officials - which nearly scuttled the raid - reflected a sea change within the U.S. spy community, one that embraces debate to avoid "slam-dunk'' intelligence in tough national security decisions.

The same sort of high-stakes dissent was on public display recently as intelligence officials grappled with conflicting opinions about threats in North Korea and Syria. And it is a vital part of ongoing discussions over whether to send deadly drone strikes against terror suspects abroad - including U.S. citizens.

The three cases provide a rare look inside the secretive 16 intelligence agencies as they try to piece together security threats from bits of vague information from around the world. But they also raise concerns about whether officials who make decisions based on their assessments can get clear guidance from a divided intelligence community. [Read more: Jakes/AP/27May2013]

Spy Agency Embroiled in Corruption Claims. Suspicions of large-scale embezzlement of public funds in the country's military intelligence agency during the first government of Robert Fico (2006-2010) have sparked a massive blame game between the former and current management of the Defence Ministry. Since the Sme daily broke the story on an anonymous 134-page file leaked from the military intelligence agencies on May 16, its alleged author emerged offering to reconstruct the file, once his oath of confidentiality is lifted. The original file was shredded when the term of the government of Iveta Radičová ended.

Claims and counter-claims have flown back and forth between former defence minister Ľubomír Galko, who was sacked in late 2011 over a scandal involving the Military Defence Intelligence (VOS) counter-intelligence agency wiretapping journalists, and his successor Martin Glváč, who later appointed one of the main suspects in the alleged embezzlement scandal to lead the merged Military Intelligence (VS) service.

The file on the investigation of employees at the former Military Intelligence Service (VSS), the authenticity of which has been neither confirmed nor denied, first emerged when the Defence Ministry was led by Galko, who claims that Glváč is responsible for halting the investigation, according to Sme. [Read more: Balogová/Spectator/23May2013]

Former Spy Agency Boss Arrested on Fraud Charges. The former head of Canada's spy-agency watchdog, who received prestigious appointments from different levels of government and was nearly honoured with a street in his name, has been arrested abroad on fraud charges.

Arthur Porter has been detained by Panamanian authorities, along with his wife Pamela, several months after Quebec police announced they wanted to charge him in connection with the province's ongoing corruption scandals.

Once regarded as the saviour of the McGill University Health Centre, Porter and his wife are in the process of being extradited to Canada.

However, a spokesperson for Quebec's anti-corruption squad, Anne-Frederick Laurence, said she had no details about the arrest.

Recently, Porter has been residing in the Bahamas and said he has Stage 4 lung cancer that has spread to his liver, making him too ill to travel. Porter's arrest warrant said he was wanted for fraud, fraud against the government, abuse of power, money laundering and conspiracy. Pamela Porter was wanted for money laundering and conspiracy. [Read more: Seidman/TheProvince/28May2013]

Zimbabwe Gives Hero Honor to Deputy Intelligence Chief, Convicted of Attempted Murder. The Zimbabwe prime minister's party said it stayed away from a state funeral Monday for an intelligence officer because he had been convicted by a court of attempted murder.

Elias Kanengoni, deputy director of the Central Intelligence Organization, died Wednesday after collapsing at his country home. He was 60.

He was buried Monday with full military honors at Heroes' Acre, a shrine for politicians and fallen former guerrillas in the bush war that led to independence in 1980.

Kanegoni, an ex-guerrilla, and an associate were sentenced to seven years in jail for repeatedly shooting an opposition politician during an election campaign in 1990. They were freed on an immediate pardon from President Robert Mugabe.

The politician survived severe groin injuries and was a lawmaker in the prime minister's party before his death in 2009.

"We don't recognize his status as a hero at all," said Douglas Mwonzora, Prime Minister Morgan Tsvangirai's party spokesman.

"The heroes' shrine was meant be the resting place for defenders of people's rights and not for 'hired assassins' with a history of violence," he said. [Read more: AP/27May2013]


Section II - CONTEXT & PRECEDENCE

Intelligence Archive: Cross Dressing Spy Who Caused a Headache for British Masters. As one of Britain's top spies in the Second World War, being arrested in Spain dressed as a woman caused a major headache for his political masters. 

Lieutenant Colonel Dudley Clarke, a key figure in British intelligence in the Middle East, was detained in Madrid after being seen "in a main street dressed, down to a brassiere, as a woman".

The spy was on his way to Egypt to pass on key information and the incident sparked a mad scramble in London to ensure he was released and sent on his way as quickly as possible.

Files released by the National Archives show that Lt Col Clarke - who was supposed to maintain a low profile, travelling under cover as a war correspondent for The Times - had stopped off in the Spanish capital on his way to north Africa in October 1941.

The embassy - where staff had been "particularly struck by his intimate knowledge of military secrets" - cabled London: "Last night he was arrested in a main street dressed, down to a brassiere, as a woman."

He told Spanish police he was a novelist and had "wanted to study the reactions of men to women in the streets". [Read more: Whitehead/Telegraph/23May2013]

MI6 Planned Black Ops Sabotage Behind Iron Curtain. MI6 wanted to mount a Cold war black ops campaign in the Soviet Union including throwing stink bombs at Communist Party meetings. 

Other tactics to cause a "general nuisance" behind the Iron Curtain included sticking up anti-Communist posters, framing diplomats and "liquidations".

However the plan was blocked by anxious Foreign Office officials who feared the consequences of such extreme methods.

The scheme was drawn up by MI6 chief Major General Sir Stewart Menzies following a call by military chiefs in 1947 for "a comprehensive political warfare plan which would include the use of both special operations and deception" to counter the growing Soviet threat.

In his paper, dated January 20, 1948, Mr. Menzies proposed a range of actions starting with "minor acts of sabotage and intimidation" such as "throwing ridicule" on Russian personalities and institutions, and distributing forged ration cards, passes and currency.

Moving up the scale he suggested could involve sending "explosive parcels", causing accidents to Russian military trains and "incendiarism", starting "accidental" fires. [Read more: Whitehead/TheTelegraph/23May2013]

I Spy: Secret Agents You Should Know. We here at the Center for Investigative Reporting and The I Files have the pleasure of coming across some fascinating investigative video reporting. The ones we're finding most fascinating these days? Espionage. It's hard enough to find out who these secret agents are, but getting enough good video to tell a story visually is difficult. (See the Israeli agent fail and North Korean female assassin below.) These two pieces got us thinking, what other epic spy stories have occurred in recent history?

Here's our list of five spy cases that leave us scratching our heads. Are we missing any? [Read more: Chen/CIROnline/28May2013]

Students Learn from CIA Career of City Alumnus. Garrett Cochran - a 37-year Central Intelligence Agency veteran and 1952 Williamsport High graduate - is the grandson of Garrett Cochran, for whom Williamsport's American Legion Post 1 is named. After speaking to Williamsport High School students Friday morning about his years in the CIA, Cochran the younger got talking about his grandfather in the course of a conversation about Weapons of Mass Destruction.

"My grandfather was trained on mustard gas," Cochran said. "After the war, there was a ban to bar chemical weapons in the League of Nations - it never passed. The veterans said 'why are we singling out chemical weapons? What about the other ones?' "

Cochran (the World War I veteran) was a Princeton man and two-time All-American in football who captained the 1896 national champions. He was then hired by the University of California, before graduating college, where he coached two years, then spent a year each at Navy and his alma mater. He then took a "real job" at the Williamsport Wire Rope Co., where he was president when he signed up for the National Guard in 1915.

Cochran was part of the hunt for Pancho Villa along the Mexican border before he was sent to Europe as an officer with the 107th Field Artillery. [Read more: Brokaw/SunGazette/25May2013]


Section III - COMMENTARY

Lessons Learned: The Iraq Invasion. Few geo-strategic and geo-political judgments on lessons learned from the Iraq War are likely to top, at least in sheer starkness, Defense Secretary Robert Gates's valedictory statement that "any future defense secretary who advises the president to again send a big American land army into Asia or into the Middle East or Africa should have his head examined."

I'm not even going to try to top that one. Besides, I'm the intel guy, not a policy wonk, and ten years may not be enough time for the really big lessons of Iraq or anywhere else to have ripened. So, instead, I'm going to look at "lessons learned" through intelligence rather than a policy lens.

First of all, there is the October 2002 National Intelligence Estimate on weapons of mass destruction. Just to be clear, I was in the room when it was approved. I voted yes. I had earlier told Condoleezza Rice, the national security adviser, that the National Security Agency (where I was director at the time) had mountains of evidence on Saddam Hussein's WMD program. The problem was that it was all circumstantial rather than definitive.

Recent accounts claim that Michael Morell, deputy director of the CIA, has commented that evidence that Osama bin Laden was living in Abbottabad was equally circumstantial. In fact, we may have had stronger evidence on Iraqi WMD that we had on bin Laden's location.

What is most striking about the 2002 estimate is not that it was wrong (which it certainly was), but that the language of the estimate was so unambiguous. We had our footnotes from State Department and Energy dissenting on "aluminum tubes" and the nuclear weapons program, but in retrospect the language is clearly over-confident and the unsuspecting policymaker leaning on this intelligence is given a false sense of certainty. Lesson learned: share your doubts. [Read more: Hayden/WorldAffairs/MayJune2013]

The Moscow Rules Still Rule. The arrest of the American diplomat, Ryan Fogle, in Moscow late Monday, May 13, was a journey to an earlier era, a throwback to a quarter century ago when these Cold War cloak and dagger spy games were painfully regular, as the United States and the Soviet Union played out the final act of a long and deadly contest. About the only difference in the handling of the ambush of Fogle by the Russian security service was that the photographic record of his arrest was in sharp, digital color, rather than grainy black and white. It was a textbook takedown. We see Fogle on the ground, arms behind him; then later in FSB headquarters being photographed with all the spy gear he was carrying. The "competent organs" are clearly protecting the motherland.

The reaction back in the United States was immediate. The "CIA has slipped into rank amateurism," observed any number of commentators. "How could he have been carrying all that spy paraphernalia," others clucked. The chatty "Dear Friend" letter he had in his possession could not have been real, spy buffs declared.

Not so fast. [Read more: Bearden/ForeignPolicy/17May2013]

Congress Smashes Pentagon's New Den of Spies. If the Pentagon's not careful, it's going to find its new network of spies rolled up by Congress.

The Defense Clandestine Service was supposed to be the Defense Department's new squad for conducting "human intelligence" - classic, informant-based spying. The idea was to place up to 1,600 undercover operatives and military attachés around the world, collecting tips on emergent battlefields. The problem was that the U.S. already had a human intelligence crew: the CIA. Almost immediately after the Defense Clandestine Service was introduced, an array of outside observers began to loudly question its value.

Add the House Armed Services Committee's intelligence panel to that list of skeptics. In its revision of next year's Pentagon budget, released Tuesday, the representatives said they would withhold half of the DCS' funding until the Pentagon proves that the service "provide[s] unique capabilities to the intelligence community."

The Defense Intelligence Agency, which runs the DCS, is trying to cast the move as a positive one for the service. "We appreciate the HASC's support in allowing us to proceed in meeting [our] mission, and we welcome the HASC's language that will allow us an opportunity to demonstrate further that we are proceeding smartly and as good stewards of taxpayers' money," Lt. Col. Thomas Veale, a Defense Intelligence Agency spokesman, tells Danger Room in an e-mail. [Read more: Shactman/Wired/21May2013]

New Terror Strategy Shifts C.I.A. Focus Back to Spying. For more than seven years, Mike - a lean, chain-smoking officer at the Central Intelligence Agency's headquarters in Virginia - has managed the agency's deadly campaign of armed drone strikes. As the head of the C.I.A.'s Counterterrorism Center, Mike wielded tremendous power in hundreds of decisions over who lived and died in far-off lands. 

But under a new plan outlined by the Obama administration on Thursday, the Counterterrorism Center over time would cease to be the hub of America's targeted killing operations in Pakistan, Yemen and other places where presidents might choose to wage war in the future. Already, the C.I.A.'s director, John O. Brennan, has passed over Mike, an undercover officer whose full name is being withheld, for a promotion to run the agency's clandestine service.

It is a sign that Mr. Brennan is trying to shift the C.I.A.'s focus back toward traditional spying and strategic analysis, but that is not an easy task. [Read more: Mazzetti/NYTimes/23May2013]

Life Under the KGB's Watchful Eye in 1980s Russia. Last week, Russia expelled an American diplomat, accusing him of being a spy for the CIA. Russia's Federal Security Service (FSB) said that U.S. Embassy Third Secretary Ryan Fogle had been caught red-handed with disguises, spy equipment, and wads of cash, trying to recruit a Russian agent.

The episode - complete with cheap looking wigs, fake glasses, a compass, a street map, and a laughable "Dear Friend" letter - seemed straight out of the Cold War.

For me, it caused a wave of nostalgia and catapulted me back to the 1980s when I was an expat child in Soviet Russia.

Our family moved to Moscow in 1980, at the height of the Cold War, when President Ronald Reagan and General Secretary Leonid Brezhnev faced off across a great iron divide. My father was an American reporter, a fluent Russian speaker, the son of a Russian Orthodox priest, and the grandson of White Russian refugees, and he was instantly considered highly suspicious.

We were constantly watched. A small Lada would follow our car around the city and a man in a dark suit would keep an eye on us as we walked about. Our phones were tapped, our apartment bugged, our mail opened, and we assumed that our government-provided housekeeper filed frequent reports on us. Even our dog was enlisted - when we took him for walks he would run happily to our mortified minder, seeking the treats he was obviously used to getting. [Read more: Schmemann/TheAtlantic/23May2013]

Cord Hart Petition for Medal for Ernest Cuneo. In describing Machiavelli, Bergen Evans once wrote: "he undertook 23 missions abroad, but he was never the top man, not one of those who sit on the lawn and have their pictures taken, but just next to that, one of the top men behind the scenes, one of those who have to do the practical work and achieve the real ends for which the fine public utterances of the men at the top are often merely a smokescreen." Ernest L. Cuneo played a similar role for Mayor Fiorello LaGuardia in New York, for the Roosevelt White House, the OSS, and the CIA. Also like Machiavelli, Cuneo died without receiving any formal recognition for his many fine contributions to the United States of America. In mid-1986, several men in the intelligence and military communities of US government vowed to correct the oversight while Cuneo still lived. They called their group "Ernie's Gang", and themselves "handy guys", terms taken from a piece of writing by Cuneo discussing his 1920's career as a professional football player for the Orange Tornadoes (corporate predecessor of the Washington Redskins). Cuneo had written "Like the other teams, we weren't great, but we weren't slouches, either. We were, in the Damon Runyan vernacular, 'handy guys'." And so this modern group of "handy guys" set to work, not at Cuneo's request, or even with his specific approval, but solely to satisfy an ideal. Below is their petition, taken partly from a tribute to Cuneo in the "Congressional Record" (Proceedings and Debates of the 100th Congress, First Session, Volume 133, No. 82, May 20, 1987), prepared after two years of additional research and presented to both a Democratic and a Republican President: read full petition and article A PATRIOT: ERNEST L. CUNEO by M. Cordell Hart at this link.


Section IV - Books and Television, and Coming Events


Books and Television

A Spy's Son Grapples With A Lifetime Of Secrets. When Scott Johnson was a kid, he wasn't really sure what his dad did; he was either a teacher, a diplomat, or a foreign service officer.

But one morning, when Johnson was 14, his father decided to tell him his real job: He was a spy for the CIA.

At first it was exciting, but as Johnson grew older, he began to wonder just how much his father was keeping from him. He tells the story of their complicated relationship in a new memoir called The Wolf and the Watchman.

Johnson writes about coming to realize that his own career wasn't entirely unlike his father's. He spent 12 years as a foreign correspondent for Newsweek covering conflicts like the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. He tells NPR's Rachel Martin that he was drawn to journalism because the idea of telling the truth about the world, getting secrets from people and sharing them with a larger audience was liberating. But, like his father, he was still trafficking in the world of secrets. "I came to understand ... just how similar these two professions are in many ways," he says.

Johnson tells Martin about the day he discovered the truth, how a woman in Mexico inspired doubts and how his father critiqued his manipulation skills. [Read more: NPR/26May2013]

The Cambodian Wars: Clashing Armies and CIA Covert Operations. For most Americans, Cambodia was a sideshow to the war in Vietnam, but by the time of the Vietnam invasion of Democratic Kampuchea in 1978 and the subsequent war, it had finally moved to center stage. Kenneth Conboy chronicles the violence that plagued Cambodia from World War II until the end of the twentieth century and peels back the layers of secrecy that surrounded the CIA's covert assistance to anticommunist forces in Cambodia during that span.

Conboy's path-breaking study provides the first complete assessment of CIA ops in two key periods - during the Khmer Republic's existence (1970-1975), in support of American military action in Vietnam, and during the Reagan and first Bush presidencies (1981-1991), when the CIA challenged Soviet expansion by supporting exiled royalists, Republicans, and even former Communists trying to expel the Vietnamese from their country. Through interviews with dozens of CIA Cambodia veterans - as well as special forces officers from Singapore, Thailand, Malaysia, and Australia - he sheds new light on the contributions made by foreign intelligence services. Through information gleaned from the U.S. Defense Attache's Office in Phnom Penh, he offers a detailed look at the development of the Khmer Rouge military structure, while his use of Vietnamese-language histories released by the People's Army of Vietnam helps more fully illuminate the PAVN's participation in the Cambodian wars.

More than a simple exposé of CIA activities, however, The Cambodian Wars is also an authoritative history of that country's struggles over half a century. [Read more: KansasPress/June2013]


Coming Educational Events

EDUCATIONAL EVENTS IN COMING TWO MONTHS....

MANY Spy Museum Events in 2013 with full details are listed on the AFIO Website at www.afio.com. The titles for some of these are in detail below and online.

31 May 2013, 7 pm - Washington, DC - The ESP in Espionage: An Evening with Alain Nu, The Man Who Knows - at the International Spy Museum

When the US government began their Star Gate program in the 1970s, they were focused on the possibility of using psychic channels to gather intelligence. Psychics, in a clinically controlled setting, were asked to perform "remote viewing"―attempting to sense targeted information about people, places, and events. Reports of the program's success run from the eerie to the off-base, but the intelligence world's pursuit of the mind's power has captured the imagination of Alain Nu. The Man Who Knows has long been obsessed with the strange, the unknown, and unexplained. His exploration of the unusual has led him to the field of mentalism and developing his untold powers. Nu's uncanny demonstrations blur the line between science and the mysteries of unexplained phenomena and have been featured in his own TLC Network television specials The Mysterious World of Alain Nu and his book Picture Your ESP! Now he is turning his ESPecially entertaining powers to the world of ESPionage. Join us for an evening with Nu inspired by Star Gate, the trickery of spies, and other top secret projects. Complimentary light hors d'oeuvres and a cash bar.
For more information or to purchase tickets please visit: www.spymuseum.org

31 May - 12 June 2013 - NYC to England - "The Spying Game: The Cold War and Cambridge" aboard the Queen Mary 2, with Intelligence Expert Nigel West

Immerse yourself in the shadowy underworld of international espionage with renowned author and intelligence expert Nigel West. Learn the truth behind the acronyms of the CIA, SOE, NKVD and KGB, as well as the role of "sleeper agents," the secret VENONA project and the race for atomic power. Aboard the elite Queen Mary 2, gain intimate vantages into the post-World War II geopolitical, ideological and economic struggles that shaped the world today. Highlights Gain expert insight into Yalta, the Manhattan Project and the greatest secret of the Cold War: VENONA. Visit Bletchley Park, home to the Enigma machine and historic headquarters of secret British code-breaking in World War II. At colleges associated with the Cambridge Five, learn how a group of undergraduates became a famous Soviet spy ring. Activity/Notes: Involves walking up to two miles per day. Itinerary/Summary: Arrival New York City, N.Y., 1 night; embark Queen Mary 2, 7 nights; disembark, Cambridge, 4 nights; departure.
For more information or to book your participation: visit www.roadscholar.org and select Program #14569

2 - 14 June 2013 - Charlottesville, VA - UVA 21st National Security Law Institute June 2013 Training Program

Each summer for the past two decades, the University of Virginia Law School's Center for National Security Law has run a highly intensive training program during the first two weeks of June. While primarily aimed at helping to prepare law professors to teach in the field, the program is also open to government lawyers from the United States and abroad. Classes are taught by some of the leading scholars and practitioners in the field, including the directors of the UVA center and of similar national security law centers at Duke and Georgetown.

The 2013 Institute will take place at the University of Virginia School of Law between June 2 and June 14. The deadline for applications is April 12, but applications may be submitted at any time before then. The $1950.00 tuition fee covers lodging during the seminar as well as books and other reading materials. Participants are responsible for their travel to and from Charlottesville and meals other than lunches during the two-week period.

Whether you are new to the field and need a broad overview of some of the most important issues, or are looking to update your expertise and take advantage of the networking opportunities the Institute offers, you will find it both an enjoyable and a rewarding educational experience. Further information on the Institute may be found at http://www.virginia.edu/cnsl/nsli.html, and questions about the Institute may be submitted by email to Professor Robert (Bob) F. Turner rft3m@virginia.edu or by phone to (434) 924-4083

Wednesday, 5 June 2013, 6 pm - Nellis AFB, NV - the AFIO Las Vegas Chapter hears Jim Parker, CIA-Ret, on "The Battle for Skyline Ridge."

Please join us at 5 p.m. in the "Robin's Roost" bar area for liaison and beverages.
Our featured speaker for the evening will be: Jim Parker, CIA (Ret.) speaking on "The Battle for Skyline Ridge." The military fight for Laos between the CIA rag-tag army of irregulars under command of Hmong General Vang Pao and two invading North Vietnamese Divisions under command of PAVN General Nguyen Huu came down to a single ridgeline.
Place: The Officers' Club at Nellis Air Force Base. All guests must use the MAIN GATE located at the intersection of Craig Road and Las Vegas Blvd. Address: 5871 Fitzgerald Blvd., Nellis AFB, NV 89191 Phone: 702-644-2582.
For access information contact Mary Bentley (mary.bentley@doe.gov) anytime or call me at 702-295-0417, We look forward to seeing you!

Wednesday, 5 June 2013, noon - Washington, DC - "Global Terrorism, Espionage, and Cybersecurity Monthly Update," at the International Spy Museum

This noontime, no cost presentation is done in partnership with the CI Centre, to provide an opportunity to be the first to learn of the most current worldwide happenings in the field of intelligence and terrorism. Drawn from the Centre’s SPYPEDIA®, the most comprehensive source of espionage information in the world. Each update covers important events and information which may not be reported by mainstream media outlets; such as, espionage penetrations and arrests, cyber espionage reporting, and terrorist events. Briefings led by CI Centre founder David Major will include trend analysis and coverage of new emerging issues of value to the intelligence and security professional and individuals with an interest in national security matters. Major will also highlight and review, as appropriate, new books and reports to keep you current with breaking developments in the national security arena. Tickets: Free! No registration required. See www.spymuseum.org

12 June 2013, 6:30 pm - Washington, DC - Wallis Simpson, Duchess of Windsor: Nazi Spy? at the International Spy Museum

When King Edward VIII abdicated the English thrown in December 1936 to marry Wallis Simpson, the world was agog. And many feared the political implications of a former king on the loose. What would these notorious lovers do? Would they attempt to influence world affairs? It seemed that the worst nightmare of many observers was coming to pass when photos of the two gleefully gladhanding Hitler appeared in 1937. During World War II, the former King was given governorship of the Bahamas - a post that those in-the-know rightly considered a form of exile. But just how dangerous were they? Amanda A. Ohlke, Adult Education Director at the International Spy Museum, will overview the most serious accusations and credit or debunk them. Much is made of secret files and gossip, but this June, the 76th anniversary of their controversial marriage, find out the truth about Wallis and Edward. After the presentation, toast the famed couple's marriage with some bubbly and trade a quip with the Baltimore-born Duchess. The Duchess, as brought to life by historical enactor Emily Lapisardi, will answer to some of the most heinous accusations in the spirit of Mrs. Simpson.
Space is limited - advance registration required! For more information or to purchase tickets please visit: www.spymuseum.org

14 June 2013, 6:30 pm - Washington, DC - Surveillance 201 with Eric O'Neill - Spy School Workshop at the International Spy Museum

What if you were assigned to watch the most damaging spy in US history? As a young operative in the FBI, Eric O'Neill was put into position as Robert Hanssen's assistant with the secret task of spying on his boss, who was under suspicion of working for Russia. O'Neill's background with the FBI was in surveillance, so he was up to the challenge. O'Neill has run some previous recruits through a surveillance basics course, and now he's ready to take those with the expertise to the next level. This advanced small group surveillance exercise is best suited to those who already know how to track the "Rabbit" without being "made." O'Neill will rate your clandestine prowess while you spy on secret meetings and operational acts and see if you can uncover the spy skullduggery that's afoot while you are on foot. There is no guarantee that your "Rabbit" won't escape!
Space is limited to only 10 participants – advance registration required! For more information or to purchase tickets please visit: www.spymuseum.org

14 June 2013, 7 - 8:30 pm - Arlington, VA - 15 Minutes with "POTUS" Briefing Competition Final Presentation at Founders Hall, George Mason University - No Charge To Attend.

15 Minutes with "POTUS" takes place at Founders Hall, George Mason University, Arlington, VA. This Policy Briefing Competition enters the Final Stage. The three finalists now will display their briefing skills to high-level policymakers.
They were assigned to imagine that they are policy analysts at the National Security Council. They have been asked to prepare a decision memo for the President. The President has allocated 15 minutes for their briefing

The three great finalists will be presenting policy briefs to Chuck Robb, Michael Hayden, and Janine Davidson. POTUS―played by The Honorable Charles S. Robb, former U.S. Senator (D-VA); National Security Advisor―played by General Michael V. Hayden, former director, CIA and NSA; Secretary of Defense―played by Dr. Janine Davidson, former Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Plans.
There is no charge to attend.

Here is the link to the RSVP page if AFIO members would like to attend to cheer-on and encourage these students and other attendees, and to meet the presidential stand-ins. 15minutes.gmu.edu/

15 Minutes with POTUS is hosted by George Mason School of Public Policy, in Founders Hall Auditorium, Friday, June 14, 2013, 7 PM to 8:30 PM (EDT) Arlington, VA.

18 June 2013, 1130am - 2pm - McLean, VA - The Defense Intelligence Forum hears Hon. James Longley, Jr. on Congressional Relations with Intel Community

The Honorable James B. Longley, Jr. will speak on Congressional Relations with the Intel Community. Longley is an attorney, Marine Corps veteran, communicator and long-standing analyst who uses this diverse background in law, business, the military, politics, Media and government to provide a clearer understanding of some the critical and complicated issues confronting the federal government. As a member of the famous, "Gingrich Congress" (1995-1997) and House Armed Services Committee, he was one of six members who, well in advance of 9/11, self-funded the House Task Force on Terrorism and Unconventional Warfare. He was also a founder on the House Shipbuilding Caucus and participated in a number of matters of intense interest to the armed services and the intelligence community, especially in the area of acquisition.
Event location: Pulcinella Restaurant, 6852 Old Dominion Drive, McLean, VA
RSVP by 17 June 2013 by email to diforum@diaalumni.org. Include names, telephone numbers, and email addresses. For each attendee, choose among Chicken Cacciatore, Tilapia Puttanesca, Lasagna, Sausage with Peppers, Fettuccini with Portabella for your lunch selection.
FEE: Pay at the door with a check for $29pp payable to DIAA, Inc.
Check is preferred, but will accept cash; however, credit card payments are discouraged.

Saturday 22 June 2013, 10am - 2:30pm - Milford, MA - AFIO New England Chapter hosts John Strauchs at their Summer Meeting

Schedule: Registration & gathering, 1000 - 1130, Membership meeting 1130 - 1200; Luncheon at 1200 followed by keynote speaker John J. Strauchs; Adjournment at 2:30PM.
Our afternoon speaker is John J. Strauchs.  His presentation is titled: The 1993 Bombing of the World Trade Center:  The Wellspring of Counterterrorism Planning for Public Buildings
John Strauchs was the chief security engineering consultant for the World Trade Center following the 1993 bombing. John will discuss the risk assessment that was conducted for the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey in May 1994 and, despite comments to the contrary by political and news media pundits, that the possibility of the deliberate crashing of an aircraft into the towers was considered. He will reveal the many security innovations that were developed for the World Trade Center, as well as lessons learned―both good and bad―and how the 1993 bombing changed life in America and how we live and work today.  The resultant security systems design consisted of more than 1000 security design drawings and an initial security construction budget of $54 million.
Note, as this meeting is a one day event we have not made any hotel arrangements.
Advance reservations are $25.00 per person.  We can no longer accept walk-ins.  Emails regarding your plans to attend will be accepted if you are late meeting the deadline.  These must be sent to Mr. Arthur Hulnick no later than 7 days prior to the event. Location: Courtyard by Marriott in Milford, Mass. Hotel website is here.
********Luncheon reservations must be made by 12 June 2013. ************** Mail your check and the reservation form to:  Mr. Arthur Hulnick, 216 Summit Avenue # E102, Brookline, MA 02446 or contact him at hlnk@aol.com Questions to afionechapter@gmail.com

22 June 2013, 2:30 pm - Kennebunk, ME - AFIO Maine meets to hear Martha Peterson, former CIA Ops Officer, describe her arrest, interrogation by KGB

Guest speaker will be Martha D. Peterson, who retired from CIA after a 32-year career as an operations officer. Martha describes what it was like to be a CIA Operations Officer assigned to Moscow during the Cold War and be arrested and interrogated by the KGB. Peterson has written The Widow Spy: My CIA Journey from the Jungles of Laos to Prison in Moscow (Wilmington: Red Canary Press, $18.95 paperback).
Event will be held at the Brick Store Museum Progam Center in Kennebunk, Maine. Further information available at 207-967-4298.

7-10 July 2013 - Dungarvan, Ireland - 3rd Annual Global Intelligence Forum - "Preparing Intelligence Analysts for the 21st Century" - Hosted by Mercyhurst University

Join us in Dungarvan, Ireland for a very special worldwide gathering of intelligence professionals, academics and decision makers.
Preparing Intelligence Analysts for the 21st Century is the theme of the conference. The Global Forum continues down the path of intelligence innovation and discovery we embarked on in July 2010. Then, we began by exploring the nature of analysis and its application in various intelligence professions. Later, in 2011, we discussed the interaction between the intelligence analyst/practitioner and the decision-maker. In July 2013 we hope to continue to build bridges between practitioners and scholars within intelligence related professions, and discuss emerging 21st century intelligence best practices.
This year's forum will center on the greater shift the intelligence analysis field must make to account for a changing world. Panelists and contributors from the national security, law enforcement, business and academic communities will discuss the emerging trends and the necessary steps intelligence practitioners must take to address 21st century problems.
View the agenda here, check out our current speaker list, view the website, and most importantly REGISTER here to join us!

Wednesday, 10 July, 2013, noon - Washington, DC - Global Terrorism, Espionage and Cybersecurity Monthly Update, at the International Spy Museum

Presented in partnership with the CI Centre, these monthly briefings will provide you with the opportunity to be the first to learn of the most current worldwide happenings in the field of intelligence and terrorism. Drawn from the Centre's SPYPEDIA®, the most comprehensive source of espionage information in the world, each Update will cover important events and information which may not be reported by mainstream media outlets. Such as: espionage penetrations and arrests, cyber espionage reporting, and terrorist events. Briefings led by CI Centre founder David Major will include trend analysis and coverage of new emerging issues of value to the intelligence and security professional and individuals with an interest in national security matters. Major will also highlight and review, as appropriate, new books and reports to keep you current with breaking developments in the national security arena.
Tickets: Free! No registration required. See www.spymuseum.org

10 July 2013, 10 am - Annapolis Junction, MD - The National Cryptologic Museum Foundation Summer Program features Dr. Melvin Goodman discussing "National Insecurity"

Dr. Melvin A. Goodman, a senior fellow at the Center for International Policy and adjunct professor of government at Johns Hopkins University, will discuss National Insecurity and will include a review of the non-military instruments for dealing with Iran, North Korea, and Syria. Dr. Goodman served 42 with the US government, including the CIA, the Defense Department, the State Department, and the US Army (as a cryptographer). His seven books on international security issues include: The Wars of Eduard Shevardnadze, The Phantom Defense, America's Pursuit of the Star Wars Illusion, Bush League Diplomacy, How the Neoconservatives are Putting the World at Risk, The Failure of Intelligence, The Decline and Fall of the CIA, National Insecuity, and The Cost of American Militarism.
The program will be held at the L-3 auditorium at the National Business Park in Annapolis Junction, MD The cost is $40 for lunch and a year's membership in the Foundation. There will be a book signing following the presentation.

25 July 2013, 12:30 - 2:30pm - Los Angeles, CA - David Glazier speaks on "Drones, Targeted Killing, and the Law" at AFIO LA Chapter

Glazier will provide a legal overview assessment of the use of drones for targeted killing.
Location: LAPD ARTC 5651 W Manchester Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90045
Please RSVP for attendance: AFIO_LA@YAHOO.COM

26 July 2013 - Washington, DC - Commencement Speaker at National Intelligence University's Graduation Ceremony is James R. Clapper, Jr., Director of National Intelligence

The Honorable James R. Clapper, Director of National Intelligence (DNI) will deliver the commencement address to National Intelligence University graduates on Friday, July 26, 2013. The commencement is the closing event in the University's 50th Anniversary year and coincidentally marks the 50th anniversary of Director Clapper's intelligence career: he was first commissioned as an Air Force intelligence officer in 1963.
NIU President Dr. David Ellison expects to present diplomas to approximately 250 graduating students from around the Intelligence Community as they cross the stage to receive one of the University's three degrees: Master of Science of Strategic Intelligence, Master of Science and Technology Intelligence, or Bachelor of Science in Intelligence.
The National Intelligence University is a federal degree-granting institution whose main campus is located in Washington, DC. Its alumni are past, present and future leaders in the intelligence and national security communities and in the private sector. Notable alumni include a former Director of National Intelligence; former directors of DIA, CIA, NSA, and NGA; former heads of military intelligence and a growing number of senior government executives and corporate leaders. For more information, visit www.ni-u.edu

For Additional Events two+ months or greater....view our online Calendar of Events


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