AFIO Weekly Intelligence Notes #30-13 dated 30 July 2013

[Editors' Note: The WIN editors attempt to include a wide range of articles and commentary in the Weekly Notes to inform and educate our readers. However, the views expressed in the articles are purely those of the authors, and in no way reflect support or endorsement from the WIN editors or the AFIO officers and staff. We welcome comments from the WIN readers on any and all articles and commentary.]
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CONTENTS

Section I - INTELLIGENCE HIGHLIGHTS

Section II - CONTEXT & PRECEDENCE

Section III - COMMENTARY

Section IV - Jobs, Books, and Coming Events

Jobs

Books

Coming Educational Events

Current Calendar for Next Two Months ONLY

 

There will be no Weekly Intelligence Notes next Tuesday, August 6th.  

They will resume the following Tuesday, August 13th.  


The Citadel - The Military College of South Carolina presents the Southeast Region Security & Intelligence Conference

10 - 11 October 2013 - Charleston, SC

"Securing Our Intelligence
& Protecting Our Ports" 

Keeping with the tradition of The Citadel's historic role in defending the country, the Criminal Justice Department and the School of Humanities is pleased to announce the next chapter in Homeland Security. The Citadel will hold its first conference dedicated to Homeland Security and Intelligence. The conference will feature professionals and academics from various disciplines and agencies related to homeland security and intelligence. Keynote speakers include: Letitia Long, Director of the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency; Robert Cardillo, Deputy Director for Intelligence Integration, Office of the Director of National Intelligence; Stu Shea, Chief Operating Officer, SAIC, and many other senior officials and experts. http://www.citadel.edu/root/criminaljustice-sersi-conference
Conference Registration: https://foundation.citadel.edu/sersi


For your 2014 Calendar

MEMBERS - HOLD THE DATE

NGA Seal small

AFIO-NGA 2014 Intelligence Symposium

1 - 3 May 2014 - Tysons Corner, VA

Thursday, 1 May we will depart early for the large, beautiful new headquarters complex of the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency located in Springfield, VA. US Citizens, only, are permitted at this part of our 3-day symposium. Will include facility tours and presentations by NGA principals on GEOINT, emergency support, mapping, and satellite reconnaissance.

Friday daytime will feature panels, speakers, and luncheon, all to be held at the Crowne Plaza Hotel in Vienna/Tysons Corner, VA. Friday evening is the reception and Spies in Black Ties™ Banquet.

Saturday, 3 May, to feature Chapter workshop and General Membership Meeting.

Registration, agenda, and further details to be supplied when available. Because of the early bus departure time on Thursday for NGA, all out-of-town symposium participants are urged to reserve rooms at the hotel starting Wednesday evening so you are ready to just come down to the lobby Thursday morning to take the 7 a.m. buses.


Traveling this year or next? Business of pleasure? Before you do....

REGISTER FOR AFIO's SUMMER LUNCHEON

FRIDAY, 23 August 2013

Badge Pick-up at 10:30 a.m.
Register HERE

11 a.m. speaker

Luke Bencie

on
Counter-Espionage and Consulting: Spy vs. Spy in Globalized Business 

author

Among Enemies: Counter-Espionage for the Business Traveler.

For the past 15 years, Bencie has traveled to over 100 countries on behalf of the U.S. Intelligence Community and private defense industry. A veteran of espionage struggles, he knows intimately the threats business and government travelers face.

Luke Bencie Among Enemies

Luke Bencie

3-course Lunch at Noon

Letitia Long, D/NGA

1 p.m. speaker

Letitia A. Long

Director
National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency

The National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) delivers geospatial intelligence to policymakers, warfighters, intelligence professionals, and first responders. NGA is a unique combination of intelligence agency and combat support agency. Anyone who sails a U.S. ship, flies a U.S. aircraft, makes national policy decisions, fights wars, locates targets, responds to natural disasters, or even navigates with a cellphone relies on NGA.

Check-in for badge pickup at 10:30 a.m.

Luke Bencie begins his presentation at 11 a.m. Lunch served at noon. NGA Director Long begins her presentation at 1 pm.

Morning and Afternoon programs are On The Record.

The latest intelligence books, and many others, for sale throughout event. Event closes at 2 p.m.

Complete a Registration Form HERE
EVENT LOCATION: The Crowne Plaza
1960 Chain Bridge Road, McLean, Virginia 22102
Driving directions here or use this link: http://tinyurl.com/boey9vf
 

Section I - INTELLIGENCE HIGHLIGHTS

White House Opposes Defense Funding Bill Amendment. The White House opposes an amendment to the defense funding bill that would restrict the National Security Agency's ability to collect communications data, press secretary Jay Carney said in a statement Tuesday evening.

"We oppose the current effort in the House to hastily dismantle one of our intelligence community's counterterrorism tools," Carney said, referring to the amendment to the National Defense Authorization Act put forward by Rep. Justin Amash (R-Mich.) and backed by Rep. John Conyers (D-Mich.), among others.

"This blunt approach is not the product of an informed, open, or deliberative process," Carney said, with no hint to the irony of speaking about a secretive program in such terms. "We urge the House to reject the Amash amendment, and instead move forward with an approach that appropriately takes into account the need for a reasoned review of what tools can best secure the nation."

The statement also details the administration's reaction to the information released by Edward Snowden over the last several weeks. [Read more: Epstein/Politico/23July2013]

Lockerbie Bomber Release Linked to Arms Deal, According to Secret Letter. The release of the Lockerbie bomber was linked by the Government to a £400 million arms-export deal to Libya, according to secret correspondence obtained by The Sunday Telegraph

An email sent by the then British ambassador in Tripoli details how a prisoner transfer agreement would be signed once Libya "fulfils its promise" to buy an air defence system.

The disclosure is embarrassing for members of the then Labour government, which always insisted that Abdelbaset al-Megrahi's release was not linked to commercial deals.

The email, which contained a briefing on the UK's relations with Colonel Muammar Gaddafi's regime, was sent on June 8 2008 by Sir Vincent Fean, the then UK ambassador, to Tony Blair's private office, ahead of a visit soon after he stepped down as prime minister.

Mr. Blair flew to Tripoli to meet Gaddafi on June 10, in a private jet provided by the dictator, one of at least six visits Mr Blair made to Libya after quitting Downing Street.

The briefing, which runs to 1,300 words, contains revealing details about how keen Britain was to do deals with Gaddafi. [Read more: Mendick/TheTelegraph/27July2013]

CIA Closing Bases in Afghanistan as it Shifts Focus Amid Military Drawdown. The CIA has begun closing clandestine bases in Afghanistan, marking the start of a drawdown from a region that transformed the agency from an intelligence service struggling to emerge from the Cold War to a counter­terrorism force with its own prisons, paramilitary teams and armed Predator drones.

The pullback represents a turning point for the CIA as it shifts resources to other trouble spots. The closures were described by U.S officials as preliminary steps in a plan to reduce the number of CIA installations in Afghanistan from a dozen to as few as six over the next two years - a consolidation to coincide with the withdrawal of most U.S. military forces from the country by the end of 2014.

Senior U.S. intelligence and administration officials said the reductions are overdue in a region where U.S. espionage efforts are now seen as out of proportion to the threat posed by al-Qaeda's diminished core leadership in Pakistan. [Read more: Miller/WashingtonPost/23July2013]

European Court to Hear New CIA Jail Case Against Poland. The European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) has agreed to consider a second case against Poland over allegations it allowed the CIA to run a secret jail on its soil, intensifying pressure on Warsaw to reveal how closely it was involved in the U.S. "war on terror".

The Strasbourg-based court will consider an application from Saudi-born Abu Zubaydah, who alleges that he was held illegally about a decade ago in a CIA-run facility on the grounds of an intelligence training academy in a Polish forest.

His case will be considered alongside one brought earlier by Saudi national Abd al-Rahim al-Nashiri, who says he was held in the same place as part of a CIA program of "extraordinary rendition" to detain and interrogate suspected al Qaeda operatives.

According to applications submitted to court by lawyers for the two men, they were flown by private jet to a remote Polish airfield and then driven to the facility near a village called Stare Kiejkuty. While there, they say they were subjected to interrogation techniques - including water-boarding - that human rights activists say amount to torture.

Polish officials deny hosting a CIA jail. [Read more: Lowe/Reuters/29July2013]

Bradley Manning Found Not Guilty of Aiding the Enemy. A military judge will announce her verdict at 1 p.m. Tuesday in the trial of Bradley Manning, the Army private who leaked hundreds of thousands of classified documents to the anti-secrecy group WikiLeaks. 

If found guilty of all charges, including aiding the enemy, Manning would face a sentence of life in prison without the possibility of parole.

The planned announcement of the verdict follows an eight-week trial at Fort Meade in Maryland, where military prosecutors argued that Manning, 25, betrayed his oath and his country, and assisted al-Qaeda because the terrorist group was able to access secret material once WikiLeaks posted it. [Read more: Tate/WashingtonPost/30July2013]

Edward Snowden Seeking to Join KGB Veterans Group. Renegade National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden has applied to join a group of former Russian intelligence and security officials, according to the group's director.

Participation in a union of former KGB security, intelligence, and police officials would likely change Snowden's status from that of a whistleblower seeking to expose wrongdoing, to an intelligence defector who has changed sides.

Alexei Lobarev, chairman of the group called "Veterans of the Siloviki" - literally "men of power" - told a Russian news outlet on Monday that Snowden, who has been staying in a Moscow airport transit lounge for a month, applied for membership in the group.

The state-run RIA Novosti news agency reported Wednesday that the Russian Federal Migration Service issued an official paper to Snowden that will allow him to leave the transit zone of Moscow's Sheremetyevo airport as part of an agreement with the Border Guard Service.

Ariel Cohen, a Russia specialist with the Heritage Foundation, said joining the former KGB officers' group would be a significant development in the Snowden affair. [Read more: Gertz/WashingtonFreeBeacon/24July2013]

Director of National Intelligence Congratulates Graduates. The presidentially appointed leader of America's intelligence community emphasized integrated effort as he spoke to hundreds of new National Intelligence University graduates today.

Director of National Intelligence James R. Clapper addressed graduates receiving bachelor's and master's degrees in intelligence, strategic intelligence and science and technology intelligence during a ceremony held at a local community college campus so families could attend.

NIU's students hold top-secret clearances and the school's main campus is part of Defense Intelligence Agency headquarters at Joint Base Anacostia Bolling in Washington D.C., with graduate and academic centers located with the National Security Agency and National Geospatial Intelligence Agency.

"The NIU's become a worldwide respected institution with a dynamic and visionary strategic plan," Clapper said. "But it's not all pie in the sky. You're actually integrating intelligence, which is a big thing to me, one student at a time. And that's precisely what the [intelligence community] needs from this institution and from you as graduates. So I salute you all for that." [Read more: Parrish/AFPS/26July2013]

Intelligence Community Eyes Superconductor Computers. Intelligence agency computing requirements have increased to such an extent that power and cooling demands have become unmanageable, and the intelligence community research arm wants to develop superconducting computers to cut energy requirements and boost performance.

The Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Agency launched a project yesterday to replace computers based on decades old complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor integrated circuit technology with cryogenic computers based on superconducting circuits. Those draw less power, require less cooling and offer improved memory capacity.

The National Security Agency's new data center in Utah exemplifies the energy requirements intelligence agencies face as they expand computer operations. That 200-acre data center requires 65 megawatts of power - enough for 54,000 households - to operate what the agency called "high performance computers" rather than supercomputers.

Harvey Davis, the NSA official in charge of the agency's infrastructure development, said the computers in the Utah data center require "different cooling and different power distributions as opposed to something you bought from Best Buy." [Read more: Brewin/NextGov/30July2013]

CIA 'Can't Rule Out al-Qaeda Role in Thaksin Video'. The United States' Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), asked by Thai intelligence officials to help verify the YouTube video containing a threat to kill former prime minister Thaksin Shinawatra, has not ruled out the involvement of al-Qaeda, a Thai intelligence source said.

CIA officials have speculated the people who produced the video were amateurs. Three languages were used in it - Arabic; Urdu, an official language of Pakistan; and English - but the CIA believes the English part was voiced-over, according to the source, who asked not to be named.

While the CIA has not given much weight to the theory that the men appearing in the clip were themselves al-Qaeda members, since no symbols of the terrorist group appear in the video, the agency has not yet ruled out the possibility that the clip was made by al-Qaeda. If that were the case, it would be the first time the group had involved itself in issues relating to the unrest in the deep South, the Thai intelligence official said.

"Al-Qaeda has not yet come out to deny it was responsible for making the clip, so we have to be pessimistic by not ruling out the possibility, and cannot be careless," he said. [Read more: Puengnetr/TheNation/31July2013]

NSA to Declassify More Information. The U.S. intelligence community plans to declassify additional information about surveillance programs of the National Security Agency, possibly as soon as Tuesday, CNN has learned.

A senior U.S. official tells CNN the information includes "white papers" on surveillance programs but also previously undisclosed information about the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court.

The official declined to be identified because the information has not been made public yet and because of the sensitive nature of the information. He would not offer further details in advance of the declassification process, which could extend into later this week.

It is unclear how the additional information would be released. [Read more: Starr/CNN/30July2013]


Section II - CONTEXT & PRECEDENCE

Former FBI Agent Tells Rotarians About Training Intelligence Analysts. To some, the words "intelligence analyst" may conjure up images of a geeky, computer-savvy guy gathering data in a cubicle deep within the bowels of some federal agency.

There is, however, a growing need for well-trained analysts at all levels in the Information Age, Dr. Tim Shaw told Bellefontaine Rotarians at the group's Monday meeting.

"The intelligence community is dwindling," said Dr. Shaw, who currently serves as vice president of strategic development and director of education at the non-profit Advanced Technical Intelligence Center for Human Capital Development in Beavercreek.

Dr. Shaw, a retired special agent with 21 years' experience with the Federal Bureau of Investigations, said the fact that fewer people are seeking careers in math and science-based fields, coupled with the demands placed on today's analysts because of the substantially increased volumes of digital information, are some of the reasons for the decline.

ATIC's flagship program is a 10-week, 10-hour-per-day analyst boot camp designed to "keep them on screen longer and get more out of them," Dr. Shaw said. [Read more: BellefontaineExaminer/23July2013]

The Military's Surveillance Blimp Can Spy Constantly for Nearly Three Weeks. A blimp might not be the most stealthy of warfare equipment, but it is what's coming to the nation's capital to act as a defense watchdog.

The Joint Land Attack Cruise Missile Defense Elevated Netted Sensor System (JLENS) developed by Raytheon will provide extensive, long-term surveillance in a trial where it will watch over the Washington, D.C. area.

The JLENS recently completed a set of complex scenarios by the U.S. Army and also proved in an endurance test it could run constantly for 20 days, according to Raytheon's announcement about its early user testing.

"Completing EUT proved both the maturity of JLENS and that our soldiers are ready to employ this system wherever and whenever their nation needs them," Dean Barten, the U.S. Army's JLENS product manager, said in a statement. "With EUT under our belts we are well on our way to deploying the system to Aberdeen Proving Ground for an operational evaluation, and ultimately, putting JLENS in the hands of the warfighter."

Raytheon's JLENS program director Doug Burgess described these tests as "when the training wheels come off" for the blimp, giving soldiers a chance to use the system "the same way they would fight."

The Aberdeen Proving Ground is a military facility located just outside of Baltimore in Maryland. [Read more: Klimas/TheBlaze/25July2013]

How Snowden's Revelations Impact Intelligence Collection Efforts. The move towards more constraints and more public oversight of U.S. intelligence gathering procedures sparked by Edward Snowden's revelations is not in the United States' best interests if it wishes to avoid intelligence failures, according to a former government intelligence community official who spoke on the issue at a panel on terrorism and intelligence.

The discussion, "Terrorism and Intelligence: Political, Legal, and Strategic Challenges," was hosted by the Washington, D.C., Potomac Institute for Policy Studies to explore issues arising from Snowden's disclosures, including the now public collection by the National Security Agency (NSA) of U.S. citizen's phone record metadata.

Wednesday, the U.S. House of Representatives voted to continue to allow the NSA to collect this data, but the risk that such authority could be curtailed due to public outrage remains.

The problem is that we are having "a debate in public that's not helpful on either side," said Dr. Donald Kerr, former principal deputy director of National Intelligence, who was the keynote speaker at the event. One problem, noted Kerr, who has held several key positions in the intelligence community, including serving as the assistant director of the FBI, is that the debate lacks "a clear discussion about the risks and benefits and constraints that attend the various activities that are being discussed."

Another problem may be that the public perceives the threat against which these efforts are directed as increasingly remote. Kerr, who has seen the effects of a terrorist attack firsthand more than once, sees the threat as ever present. He told attendees that he joined the FBI soon after two U.S. embassies were bombed in Africa in 1998. "Face to face with where over 200 people died. It's something you don't forget," he said. [Read more: Harowitz/SecurityManagement/26July2013]

Bad Management Drives Talent from CIA, Internal Reports Suggest. For the Central Intelligence Agency, he was a catch: an American citizen who had grown up overseas, was fluent in Mandarin and had a master's degree in his field. He was working in Silicon Valley, but after the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, he wanted to serve his country.

The analyst, who declined to be named to shield his association with the CIA, was hired in 2005 into the agency's Directorate of Intelligence, where he was assigned to dig into Chinese politics. He said he was dismayed to discover that unimpressive managers wielded incredible power and suffered no consequences for mistakes. Departments were run like fiefdoms, he said, and "very nasty internecine battles" were a fixture.

By 2009, he had left the CIA. He now does a similar job for the U.S. military.

CIA officials often assert that while the spy agency's failures are known, its successes are hidden. But the clandestine organization celebrated for finding Osama bin Laden has been viewed by many of its own people as a place beset by bad management, where misjudgments by senior officials go unpunished, according to internal CIA documents and interviews with more than 20 former officers. [Read more: Dilanian/WashingtonTimes/29July2013]

Untold Tale Behind USS Guardian Reef Grounding: NGA's Map Was Wrong by 8 Miles. The January grounding of the minesweeper USS Guardian in a Philippine coral reef was caused in large part by a National Geospatial Intelligence Agency (NGA) map that was, quite simply, wrong by eight nautical miles, Breaking Defense has learned.

"It really was just a terrible fluke that caused the error," NGA spokeswoman Christine Phillips said in a frank discussion of the incident and its aftermath.

The Sulu Sea grounding prompted NGA to order an agency-wide review of the nautical charts detailing the entire surface of the earth covered by the oceans. Also, NGA and the Navy have convened a team of maritime experts to take "an exhaustive look to make sure we are as sound as we can be," Phillips told me.

The error boiled down to someone at NGA failing to update a map with corrected data after cartographers discovered an inaccuracy.

Here's what happened. [Read more: Clark/BreakingDefense/28July2013]

When Art Fought the Cold War. In the 1990s, a long held suspicion was confirmed: the US Central Intelligence Agency secretly sent Abstract Expressionism and other forms of American art and music abroad in the 1950s and 1960s as part of a propaganda campaign to assert American cultural dominance in the Cold War era. The first chief of the CIA division spearheading that campaign stated why the operation had to be clandestine: "It was very difficult to get Congress to go along with some of the things we wanted to do - send art abroad - In order to encourage openness we had to be secret." 

Their certainty of government disapproval was based on experience. In 1946, the US State Department assembled an art collection with the intention of touring it internationally to demonstrate the freedoms America allowed its artists. One that would determine that, in the proud words of the Assistant Secretary of State for Public Affairs, "only in a democracy where the full development of the individual is not only permitted but fostered could such an exhibition be assembled". But the project was ill-fated; a media-fueled outcry by the public and elected officials over the use of taxpayers' money to fund the programme led to political backpedalling. Hastily, the art was recalled from overseas and the organising curator fired.

The most thorough recreation to date of that doomed project can be seen in "Art Interrupted: Advancing American Art and the Politics of Cultural Diplomacy", a travelling exhibition jointly organised by three university museums: Auburn University, the University of Oklahoma and the University of Georgia (Indiana University is also participating as a venue for the tour, but is not one of the organisers). The exhibition and its accompanying catalogue offer a thorough examination of a moment in American history when politics and culture - as well as professional expertise and populist taste - clashed, a phenomenon that feels all-too-familiar. [Read more: Ross/TheArtNewspaper/May2013]

Who Was Glen Doherty? Details emerge on former SEAL's final actions in Benghazi. It was supposed to be his last assignment working security and surveillance for the CIA. Glen Doherty, the former Navy SEAL who was working for the CIA's Global Response staff in Libya on Sept. 11 last year, was in the capital of Tripoli when the call for help came from the diplomatic mission in Benghazi - a "consulate" in name only. 

"Greg, Greg, we are under attack," were the last words from Ambassador Chris Stevens to his deputy Greg Hicks over the phone from Benghazi shortly after the attack began around 9:30 p.m. 

"If you don't get here we are going to die," the radio operator at the tactical operations center in Benghazi pronounced on the radio from the consulate. 

Fox News has learned more details about Doherty's actions, as he and others scrambled to try and save the U.S. team after those pleas for help. 

Doherty was part of the quick reaction force that left Tripoli to help rescue the ambassador and his team at the consulate, as well as the 21 CIA personnel at the CIA annex one mile from where Stevens and the others came under attack. [Read more: Griffin/FoxNews/26July2013]

North Korea to Make Museum Out of Only US Ship Held by a Foreign Government. If there was ever any doubt about what happened to the only U.S. Navy ship that is being held by a foreign government, North Korea has cleared it up. It's in Pyongyang. And it looks like it's here to stay.

With a fresh coat of paint and a new home along the Pothong River, the USS Pueblo, a spy ship seized off North Korea's east coast in the late 1960s, is expected to be unveiled this week as the centerpiece of a renovated war museum to commemorate what North Korea calls "Victory Day," the 60th anniversary this Saturday of the signing of the armistice that ended hostilities in the Korean War.

The ship is North Korea's greatest Cold War prize. Its government hopes the Pueblo will serve as a potent symbol of how the country has stood up to the great power of the United States, once in an all-out ground war and now with its push to develop the nuclear weapons and sophisticated missiles it needs to threaten the U.S. mainland.

Many of the crew who served on the vessel, then spent 11 months in captivity in North Korea, want to bring the Pueblo home. Throughout its history, they argue, the Navy's motto has been "don't give up the ship." The Pueblo, in fact, is still listed as a commissioned U.S. Navy vessel, the only one being held by a foreign nation.

But with relations generally fluctuating in a narrow band between bad to dangerously bad, the United States has made little effort to get it back. [Read more: AP/25July2013]


Section III - COMMENTARY

A GOP Flip-Flop on Intelligence. On May 26, 2011, the House passed the 2011 Patriot Sunset Extension Act, which reauthorized Section 215 of the USA Patriot Act, the provision that underlies the National Security Agency's telephone metadata program. The House approved the bill by a 97-vote margin, with 196 Republicans voting in favor.

Last week, the House narrowly voted down an amendment by Rep. Justin Amash, R-Mich., that would have killed this vital intelligence program. This time, 94 House Republicans voted against the NSA program - including 50 who had voted to authorize the exact same program two years before.

What changed? [Read more: Thiessen/WashingtonPost/30July2013]

The Manning Verdict is a Mistake. The military judge has seriously erred in acquitting Bradley Manning of aiding the enemy, though his guilt on numerous, lesser charges should mean that he will spend the rest of his life in jail. Manning gave a treasure trove of classified intelligence to Wikileaks which has gravely damaged our national security by releasing the names of intelligence assets, disclosed U.S. tactics and operations, and revealed secret diplomatic negotiations. In this covert war against al-Qaeda, a stateless enemy which conceals itself as civilians to attack innocents by surprise, intelligence is the most important weapon. Manning should have been convicted of aiding the enemy just as should someone who leaked weapon plans during wartime.

Manning's defenders will say that Manning only leaked information to the 21st-century equivalent of a newspaper, and that he could not have known that al-Qaeda would read it. But Wikileaks is not the New York Times or the Wall Street Journal and it does not have First Amendment rights. Manning communicated regularly with Wikileaks's founder and would have known about the group's anarchic, anti-U.S. mission. He also would have known that posting anything on the Internet would make it available to al-Qaeda in Iraq, Afghanistan, and world-wide. His actions knowingly placed the lives of American soldiers, agents, and allies at grave risk. In the world of instant, world-wide communications and non-state terrorist groups, Manning committed the crime of aiding the enemy, and he is lucky to escape the death penalty. [Read more: Yoo/NationalReview/30July2013]


Section IV - Jobs, Books, and Coming Events


Jobs
 [IMPORTANT: AFIO does not "vet" or endorse these research inquiries or job offers. Reasonable-sounding inquiries and career offerings are published as a service to our members, and for researchers, educators, and subscribers. You are urged to exercise your usual caution and good judgment when responding or supplying any information.]

Intelligence Analyst Sought - Walsingham Group is seeking Intelligence Analyst candidates for immediate open positions in Afghanistan.
Position Description:
The Intelligence Analyst functions as a part of an intelligence analytical team of military and/or DoD civilian analysts in support of CJ2 analytical requirements. The Intelligence Analyst is responsible for analysis, reporting, data base input and dissemination of Afghanistan measures of stability which include security, governance and development, Human Terrain Analysis, preparation of provincial and district assessments and Campaign and Mission Analysis briefings and annexes, High Value Individual Targeting products, Extremist and Regional Threat Network Nodal Analysis, Preparation of Intelligence Surveillance and Reconnaissance Assessment Metrics which include daily IMINT, SIGINT and HUMINT products to gauge the effectiveness of collection operations, 24/7 Indications & Warning withstanding and all-source exploitation of documents and media from detainees. This position is mid level analyst.
Position Requirements:
This position requires a minimum of 4 years analytical experience within DoD or equivalent Government agencies required, with operational level experience preferred. Experience in either CT, Afghanistan, South West Asia regional issues and HUMINT or political/military analysis desired.
• Shall be proficient in utilizing basic computer applications and intelligence related automation to support analytical efforts and product development.
Possess strong research and writing skills and be capable of effectively operating as a member of a strategic level analytical team in the accomplishment of intelligence products and assessments. This position requires former MOS 1N, 35F, 350F, 18F, 35D, 34A or equivalent.
• This position requires Top Secret/SCI clearance (must be current).
Submit your resume to careers@walsinghamgroup.com.

Books

At Close Quarters: The True Story of SOE Close Combat Pistol Instructor Colonel Hector Grant-Taylor. The Special Operations Executive (SOE), the paramount Allied sabotage and assassination force of the Second World War. Its job - in Churchill's words - was to "set Europe ablaze."

One of its "shining Stars" and "legends" was the close-combat pistol instructor, Colonel Hector Grant-Taylor. A romantic figure worthy of the Scarlet Pimpernel or Fleming's James Bond, Grant-Taylor taught the commandos, secret agents and irregular soldiers of WW2 the art of how to kill at close quarters.

And yet his own life was itself a mystery worthy of a John Buchan thriller novel?

The book provides a detailed investigation into Colonel Grant-Taylor, the "myths" surrounding his life story and chronicles his method of close quarter combat. 

Misinformation, deception, love triangles, tragedy, bravery, killing - and ultimately redemption - all play a part in this story.

At Close Quarters finally puts to rest the myths and legends that surrounded his life and his method of close quarter killing. Finally unraveling the 60 year mysterious truth behind the enigmatic man that was Colonel Hector Grant-Taylor! [Read more: Spanglefish.com/July2013]


Coming Educational Events

EDUCATIONAL EVENTS IN COMING TWO MONTHS....

MANY Spy Museum Events in 2013 with full details are listed on the AFIO Website at www.afio.com. The titles for some of these are in detail below and online.

Saturday, 3 August 2013, 11:30 am - Melbourne, FL - "When Clerics Say Kill" the topic at the AFIO Satellite Chapter Meeting

The topic will be "When Clerics Say Kill" and the speaker will be Don White. He asks: How do devout, intelligent, educated, religious leaders drift from their core beliefs to the point of ordering the deaths of innocent people? What do they look for in recruiting a suicide bomber? Could it happen here in America in significant numbers?
Meeting being held at: the Indian River Colony Club's At Ease Club, starting at 11:30 AM. Questions or to register contact Bobbie Keith, 321 777 5561 or email her at bobbie6769@juno.com

Thursday, 8 August 2013, Noon-2:00 pm - Washington DC - The Returned & Services League of Australia meets to hear Manclark on Flying the Mig 21 as a Red Eagle.

Mr. John T. Manclark will speak on flying the Mig 21 and other Russian aircraft with the Red Eagles. Prior to his retirement on March 31, 2012, John T. Manclark, was a member of the Senior Executive Service, and the Director of Test and Evaluation, Headquarters U.S. Air Force, Washington, D.C. He was responsible for all policy, resources and oversight of developmental and operational testing, and was the focal point for foreign materiel acquisition and exploitation.

Mr. Manclark entered the Air Force and was commissioned in 1969 through Officer Training School at Lackland Air Force Base, Texas. He completed undergraduate pilot training in 1970 and numerous tours in tactical aviation as a flight commander and operations officer. Mr. Manclark later served as Commander of the 4477th Test and Evaluation Squadron. He completed two staff tours, first as Chief of Aircrew Assignments at Headquarters Tactical Air Command, and later as Chief of the Policy and Programs Division within the Directorate of Test and Evaluation at Air Force headquarters. Mr. Manclark retired from active duty as a colonel in 1994 and entered the Senior Executive Service in 1995.

Where - Amenities Room, Embassy of Australia, 1601 Massachusetts Ave. NW. Washington DC 20036
Charge - $15.00 including buffet lunch and sodas. Alcoholic beverages - $2.00 each.
RSVP to David Ward at 202-352-8550 or via e-mail to dmward1973@gmail.com
NOTE: Valid photo ID required
Parking: While there is no parking at the Embassy, paid off street parking is available behind and under the Airline Pilots Association- 17th and Mass, and at 15th and Mass (1240 15th street). On street two hour metered parking is also available.

Saturday, 10 August 2013 - Orange Park, FL - North Florida Chapter hears from J. Perry Smith, a CIA Field Operative/FBI Senior Executive.

Our upcoming meeting is to be held on Saturday, August 10th, at the Country Club of Orange Park, starting at 11:00 am.
Our guest speaker will be the same gentleman who was scheduled for the May 11th meeting, and his bio is repeated below because it certainly deserves air time:
We have a most unique guest speaker for the occasion, J. Perry Smith, who is currently serving as Canon Pastor at St. John's Cathedral in Jacksonville.
But that's just the tip of the iceberg of a most unusual and diverse career. He was born in Knoxville, Tennessee in 1944, but spent his early childhood in West Virginia and California.
In the early 1960s, he tried his hand at bullfighting in Mexico, life as a Trappist monk at The Abbey of Gethsemani near Bardstown, Kentucky, with Thomas Merton, and in 1967-68, he went to war in Vietnam.
Perry did what few people have ever done. He was a CIA field operative for eight years, then left the agency and ultimately became a senior executive FBI Agent. His CIA story will appeal to those interested in an insider's perspective, spy versus spy, set mostly in Mexico, Central America and Europe during the Cold War.
His 22 years of experience as an FBI Agent give a rare opportunity to see how one of the world's most secretive organizations actually operates. Then, even more rare, he became an Episcopal priest.
On September 11, 2001, Perry Smith was reading in the courtyard at the Virginia Theological Seminary when he heard an explosion and felt the ground shake. Just eleven days earlier he had retired from the FBI. The antiterrorism unit had been his last assignment. Now he was studying to become an Episcopal priest.
Perry lived in Spain and Latin America for many years and is an enthusiastic Hispanist, fluent in Spanish and a frequent traveler to Spain.
Incidentally, he will be bringing copies of his book The Unlikely Priest to the meeting if you are interested in purchasing one.
PLEASE RSVP TO QUIEL BEGONIA AT qbegonia@comcast.net or call him at (904) 545-9549, AS SOON AS POSSIBLE. Spouses, kin and guests (especially eligible ones!) are cordially invited.

Tuesday, 13 August 2013, noon - Washington, DC - The Secret Rescue: An Untold Story of American Nurses and Medics Behind Nazi Lines, at the International Spy Museum

When 26 Army nurses and medics - part of the 807th Medical Air Evacuation Transport Squadron - boarded a transport plane in November, 1943, they never anticipated the crash landing in Nazi-occupied Albania that would lead to their months-long struggle for survival. The group dodged bullets and battled blinding winter storms as they climbed mountains and fought to survive, aided by courageous villagers who risked death at Nazi hands as well as Britain's Special Operations Executive (SOE) and the American OSS. Join author Cate Lineberry, a former writer and editor for Smithsonian Magazine, for this mesmerizing tale of World War II courage and heroism.
Join the author for an informal chat and book signing.
Tickets: Free! No registration required. See www.spymuseum.org

Wednesday, 14 August, 2013, noon - Washington, DC - Global Terrorism, Espionage and Cybersecurity Monthly Update, at the International Spy Museum

Presented in partnership with the CI Centre, these monthly briefings will provide you with the opportunity to be the first to learn of the most current worldwide happenings in the field of intelligence and terrorism. Drawn from the Centre's SPYPEDIA®, the most comprehensive source of espionage information in the world, each Update will cover important events and information which may not be reported by mainstream media outlets. Such as: espionage penetrations and arrests, cyber espionage reporting, and terrorist events. Briefings led by CI Centre founder David Major will include trend analysis and coverage of new emerging issues of value to the intelligence and security professional and individuals with an interest in national security matters. Major will also highlight and review, as appropriate, new books and reports to keep you current with breaking developments in the national security arena.
Tickets: Free! No registration required. See www.spymuseum.org

Wednesday, 14 August 2013 - McLean, VA - TECHEXPO POLYGRAPH-ONLY hiring event

TECHEXPO is producing two POLYGRAPH-ONLY hiring events this August!
Don't miss your chance to upgrade your career by interviewing at this exclusive event
that is designed for polygraph tested professionals like you.
TECHEXPO Polygraph Only. Event being held at Ritz Carlton Tysons Corner, 1700 Tysons Blvd., McLean, VA 22102
Active Security Clearance w/ a CI or Full Scope Polygraph Required to Attend
For details visit TechExpoUSA.com

Thursday, 15 August 2013 - Baltimore, MD - TECHEXPO POLYGRAPH-ONLY hiring event

TECHEXPO is producing two POLYGRAPH-ONLY hiring events this August!
Don't miss your chance to upgrade your career by interviewing at this exclusive event
that is designed for polygraph tested professionals like you.
TECHEXPO Polygraph Only. Event location: BWI Marriott, 1743 West Nursery Road, Baltimore, MD 21090
Active Security Clearance w/ a CI or Full Scope Polygraph Required to Attend
For details visit TechExpoUSA.com

19 - 21 August 2013 - Long Beach, CA - Maritime Security 2013 West - "Technology and Strategies to Mitigate Security Threats to the Maritime Domain"

Captain James D. Jenkins, Sector Commander, U.S. Coast Guard Sector Los Angeles - Long Beach, to give opening keynote address on August 20th.
SEE NEWLY REVISED AND MORE DETAILED AGENDA
Maritime Security 2013 West will bring together public and private stakeholders from all levels to discuss, learn and collaborate on strategies and technology use in mitigating security threats posed to the maritime domain.
Registration here:
- All access registration rates range from $95 to $445
- Discounts available for Maritime Security East and Small Vessel Security Threats Program attendees and NASBLA Members
- Please click here for Registration information or call us at 203-221-2664 or email us at customerservice@hsoutlook.com

Thursday, 22 August 2013, 6:30 pm - Washington, DC - James Bond, All-American Hero: Exquisitely Evil Programs, at the International Spy Museum

Leave your affected British accent at the door!
When Ian Fleming created the character James Bond he made him English to the core, from his Aston Martin to his quick wit and loyalty to the Queen. Historian Jonathan Nashel contends that as Bond has become a global phenomenon something very curious has happened to 007: he has become an all-American hero. Nashel argues that as Bond was idolized by millions of American men during the Cold War, he set the standard for many of them - including President John F. Kennedy. Bond showed how a man should carry himself and especially how he should act when confronted with danger. And English or American, would James Bond have been as fascinating without the evildoers in his films? Nashel will show how the evolving Bond and his responses to these villains and threats influenced the values and mores behind US Cold War policy and affected the image of red, white, and blue Cold War masculinity.
Tickets: $10 Visit www.spymuseum.org to register or more information.

Friday, 23 August 2013, 10:30 am - 2 pm - Tysons Corner, VA - Letitia Long, Director, National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency, and Luke Bencie on Counterespionage for Travelers.

AFIO National Summer Luncheon features Letitia Long, the Director of the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency, and Luke Bencie, author of AMONG ENEMIES: Counter-Espionage for the Business Traveler.

The National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) delivers geospatial intelligence to policymakers, warfighters, intelligence professionals, and first responders. NGA is a unique combination of intelligence agency and combat support agency. Anyone who sails a U.S. ship, flies a U.S. aircraft, makes national policy decisions, fights wars, locates targets, responds to natural disasters, or even navigates with a cellphone relies on NGA. NGA enables all of these through timely, relevant, accurate and actionable GEOINT. NGA manages a global consortium of more than 400 commercial and government relationships. Director Long serves as the functional manager for GEOINT, the head of the National System for Geospatial Intelligence (NSG), and the coordinator of the global Allied System for Geospatial Intelligence (ASG). In these multiple roles, NGA receives guidance and oversight from DOD, the Director of National Intelligence (DNI), and Congress. Headquartered in Springfield, Virginia, NGA has two major locations in St. Louis and Arnold, Mo. Hundreds of NGA employees serve on support teams at U.S. military, diplomatic, and allied locations around the world.

Check-in for badge pickup at 10:30 a.m. Luke Bencie begins his presentation at 11 a.m. Lunch served at noon, NGA Director Long begins her presentation at 1 pm. Morning and Afternoon programs are On The Record The latest intelligence books, and many others, for sale throughout event. Event closes at 2 p.m.
EVENT LOCATION: The Crowne Plaza, 1960 Chain Bridge Road, McLean, Virginia 22102; Driving directions here or use this link: http://tinyurl.com/boey9vf
Register HERE

Wednesdays, 04 September - 25 September 2013, 10:15 a.m. - 11:45 a.m. - Washington, DC - James Bond: Fact Into Fiction (and Back) 4-Session Daytime Course, at the International Spy Museum.

No one has introduced more people to the secret realm of espionage than James Bond. The man we know as 007 has been the face of clandestine operations for more than half a century, giving readers and movie audiences glimpses of a hidden world few are able to imagine.
Bond and his onscreen exploits represent fiction informed by some truth - some of it drawn from author Ian Fleming's own experiences in covert operations as a WWII British naval intelligence officer. In books and onscreen, the ablest agent of British secret intelligence service MI6 faces threats - from Cold War cliffhangers in the Caribbean to mass-media manipulation in the 1990s - that seemed fantastic at the time, but occasionally foreshadowed future headlines.
In Bond's flamboyant adventures, he deploys techniques and technologies that genuine spies use - or perhaps will, should fact catch up with cinematic imagination. His onscreen gadgets are said to have inspired innovations in disguise and communications technologies by real intelligence agency technical services units.

In this series, experts and former intelligence officers explore the intersecting powers of James Bond in fiction and fact, presented in conjunction with the International Spy Museum's continuing exhibition Exquisitely Evil: 50 Years of Bond Villains. They place Bond and his nemeses in historical context, exploring how the evildoers and their plots have changed to reflect their times. (The series price includes a ticket to tour Exquisitely Evil.)

Sept. 4 - Bond Begins: A Cold War Spy
When Ian Fleming created James Bond in 1953, he drew on his own espionage career with British naval intelligence during WW II. Explore the roots of Fleming and Bond with Alexis Albion, PhD, an intelligence historian who served as a guest co-curator of Exquisitely Evil and is a former 9/11 Commission staff member. Learn how the Bond of Fleming's novels evolved to become the superspy universally known for impeccable taste, wit, and physical prowess. Dr. Albion is joined by Burton Gerber, a former CIA Clandestine Service officer and station chief in critical Cold War hotspots, who uncovers the realities of operating behind the Iron Curtain.

Sept. 11 - Bond After the Fall
Bond's fictional world changed after the fall of Communism - just as the collapse of the Soviet Union brought the Western intelligence community a range of challenges, from the absence of a major adversary to slashed funding. Hear from the Museum's Executive Director Peter Earnest, a former CIA Clandestine Service officer, on the transition from the Cold War to the post-Soviet era, and how Bond's adventures mirror the real-world issues and villains of the late-20th century. Jack Platt, another former Clandestine Service officer, provides firsthand observations of the fall of the Soviet Union, the decline of the Russian economy and way of life, and the growth of syndicated crime and corruption in that country.

Sept. 18 - 21st-Century Bond
The museum's historian and Exquisitely Evil co-curator Mark Stout, PhD, a former CIA intelligence analyst, brings you up to speed on the latest Bond villains and their connections to reality. How does Skyfall's Raoul Silva reflect Julian Assange of Wikileaks? How has radicalism and terrorism altered both Bond plotlines and our approach to intelligence? Cindy Storer, a former CIA officer in the Counterterrorism Center, adds perspective on how the intelligence business has changed in response to terrorism.

Sept. 25 - Bond's Women: More Than Meets the Eye
The museum's Adult Programs Director Amanda Ohlke explores the role of women in Bond's universe, from beautiful-but-deadly villains like Elektra King to Judi Dench's steely take on spy boss M. Former CIA officer Melissa Mahle discusses what it was like to undertake an espionage career in the shadow of the femme fatale. Did the Bond girl mystique help or hinder her career? She shares how she took control of the stereotypes and turned them upside down.

Tickets: $120. Obtain yours now via phone: 202.633.3030; or online at www.SmithsonianAssociates.org. Internet Quick Tix code for the program: 1M2-675.
Includes admission to Exquisitely Evil: 50 Years of Bond Villains commemorating the 50th anniversary of the Bond films. See over 100 film artifacts from the archives of EON Productions, the Bond film producers.

Tuesday, 10 September 2013, noon - Washington, DC - "Cyber War Will Not take Place," at the International Spy Museum with author Thomas Rid.

Is cyber war really coming? Scholar Thomas Rid of the Department of War Studies at Kings College London argues that the focus on war distracts from the real challenge of cyberspace: non-violent confrontation that may rival or even replace violence in surprising ways. In this provocative talk, the author will trace the most significant hacks and attacks and explore some key questions: What are cyber weapons? How have they changed the meaning of violence? How likely and how dangerous is crowd-sourced subversive activity? Why has there never been a lethal cyber-attack against a country's critical infrastructure? How serious is the threat of cyber-espionage? And who is most vulnerable in the cyber realm?
Join this British author for an informal chat and book signing. Tickets: Free! No registration required. For more information visit www.spymuseum.org

Wednesday, 11 September 2013, 6 p.m. - Las Vegas, NV - The AFIO Las Vegas Chapter hears Col James Harvey, USAF on "Silent Shield"

Our featured speaker for the evening will be: COL James P. Harvey, USAF
Topic: SILENT SHIELD: AFSOC's Direct Support Operators. As a result of a hostile fire incident during Operation JUST CAUSE, AFSOC and AIA established a program called SILENT SHIELD. This program uses a special group of airborne cryptologic linguists (called Direct Support Operators) to provide a direct threat warning "shield" around special operations aircraft. Over the decades, the SILENT SHIELD mission has grown into a joint, special operations capability featuring airborne cryptologic linguists and their language skills as a weapon and extending the shield around ground and maritime special operations forces. During operations ENDURING and IRAQI FREEDOM, these intelligence professionals even became a "go no-go" criteria for many critical special operations ground missions.
In November 1991, Knife 01 crashed in Afghanistan with one of these special operations intelligence professionals on board. The DSO's actions in the air and on the ground saved the lives of the crew and several Afghan civilians.
Presenter: Col J.P. Harvey is an AFSOC plank-holder, was an MH-60G pilot from 1987-1991, and commanded the 25th Intelligence Squadron (SILENT SHIELD) from 2006-2008.
Colonel James P. Harvey is the Air Force Intelligence Surveillance and Reconnaissance Agency's representative to the Commander, USAF Warfare Center, Nellis AFB, Nevada, and serves as the Center's Director of Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance. The USAFWC is responsible for assuring combat air, space, and information operations forces are trained and equipped to conduct integrated combat operations. As the A2, Colonel Harvey integrates ISR across the Center's air, space and cyberspace advanced testing, tactics development and training efforts.
Colonel Harvey was commissioned in May 1986 and following Undergraduate Helicopter Training, he served as a pilot in the 55th Special Operations Squadron. Following this assignment, he instructed at the Air Force Academy as a Course Director and Assistant Professor. Colonel Harvey then attended the Intelligence Officers Course, completed as the Honor Graduate, and has held numerous joint, interagency and Air Force positions leading to his current post.
at Nellis Air Force Base Officers' Club
(Guest names must be submitted along with their birth date to me by 4:00 p.m., Monday, August 19, 2013
Please join us at 5 p.m. in the "Robin's Roost" bar area for liaison and beverages.

Place: The Officers' Club at Nellis Air Force Base. All guests must use the MAIN GATE, located at the intersection of Craig Road and Las Vegas Blvd. Address: 5871 Fitzgerald Blvd., Nellis AFB, NV 89191 Phone: 702-644-2582.

Nellis Air Force Base Access:
If you have provided your name, date of birth and either a drivers' license number or a social security number, your name will be at the guarded main gate at the entrance of Nellis Air Force Base. If not, please provide this information to me by Monday August 19, 2013, or you will not be admitted on base. If you currently have adequate base access, you do not need to provide this information.

RSVP to Mary Bentley (mary.bentley@doe.gov) or call her at 702-295-0417, if you have any questions. We look forward to seeing you!

Wednesday, 11 September 2013, noon - Washington, DC - "Global Terrorism, Espionage and Cybersecurity" (a Monthly Update), at the International Spy Museum featuring David Major.

Presented in partnership with the CI Centre, these monthly briefings will provide you with the opportunity to be the first to learn of the most current worldwide happenings in the field of intelligence and terrorism. Drawn from the Centre's SPYPEDIA®, a comprehensive online subscription database of espionage information, each of these updates covers important events and information which may not be reported by mainstream media outlets. Such as: espionage penetrations and arrests, cyber espionage reporting, and terrorist events. Briefings led by CI Centre founder David Major will include trend analysis and coverage of new emerging issues of value to the intelligence and security professional and individuals with an interest in national security matters. Major will also highlight and review, as appropriate, new books and reports to keep you current with breaking developments in the national security arena.
Tickets: Free! No registration required. For more information visit www.spymuseum.org

Wednesday, 11 September 2013, 7 pm - 10 pm - Washington, DC - "Dinner with a Spy," An Evening with Malcolm Nance.

He's been undercover in terrorist hotspots, passed hostile border crossings in disguise, submitted to waterboarding, and now he's prepared to dine with you. Malcolm W. Nance is a counterterrorism and terrorism intelligence expert with wide-ranging field and combat experience. A frequent guest commentator on breaking news, he's the author of The Terrorist Recognition Handbook among other books. Drawing on his experience as a 20-year veteran of the US intelligence community's Combating Terrorist program, he's been a consultant for the US government on special operations, homeland security, and intelligence. As a master Survival, Evasion, Resistance and Escape (SERE) instructor, he can handle any tricky situation including testifying before the US Congress. You will be one of only 20 guests at Poste for a three-course dinner where you'll talk with him about his extraordinary experiences and thoughts on today's intelligence issues.
Tickets: $225. Please call 202.654.0932 or email lhicken@spymuseum.org to register and provide any special dietary needs.
Ticket includes hors d'oeuvres and three-course dinner with wines. Registration required, space is limited! For more information visit www.spymuseum.org.
Location: Poste, 555 8th St NE, Washington, DC 20002

Monday, 16 September 2013, 5:30 - 8 pm - New York, NY - "Putin's Russia" featuring KGB Maj Gen Oleg D. Kalugin, addressing AFIO NY Metro Chapter

Gen. Kalugin was one of the youngest generals in the history of the KGB, and his intelligence career spanned the better part of the Cold War. As deputy resident at the Soviet embassy in Washington, DC, he oversaw Moscow's spy network in the United States, and as head of KGB foreign counter-intelligence, he directed several Soviet covert actions against the West. In his memoirs, Spymaster, KGB Major General Oleg Kalugin (Ret.) provided an unparalleled look at the inner workings of Moscow's famed spy agency. Join Kalugin to hear firsthand of his assessment of how Russia and its intelligence organs have fared under Russian president Vladimir Putin, including the death of Russian intelligence defector Alexander Litvinenko in London in 2006, up to the present quandary dealing with the Edward Snowden leaker affair.
Location:  Society of Illustrators Building  128 East 63rd Street (between Park Ave and Lexington Avenue). 
Times:  Registration starts at 5:30 PM with 6 PM meeting start. 
Fee: $50/pp - advanced registration required at afiometro@gmail.com or call 646-717-3776.

Thursday, 19 September 2013, 11:30 am - Colorado Springs, CO - The Rocky Mountain Chapter presents Mark Pfoff, Detective El Paso County Sheriff's Office

The Rocky Mountain Chapter presents Mark Pfoff, Detective, El Paso County Sheriff's Office will talk on a case he has been working since 2006 regarding an Online Predator that is finally coming to a close. This event will take place on 19 Sep 2013 at 11:30am. To be held at The Inn at Palmer Divide, 443 S. Highway 105 Palmer Lake, CO, Exit 161 westbound off I-25, West on Highway 105. Please RSVP to Tom VanWormer at robsmom@pcisys.net

Thursday, 26 September 2013, 6:30 pm - Washington, DC - "Enemies Within: Inside the NYPD's Secret Spying Unit and bin Laden's Final Plot Against America," at the International Spy Museum

Six months after the 9/11 attacks, New York Police Commissioner Ray Kelly initiated a straightforward, yet audacious, antiterrorist plan to be implemented in the Big Apple, dispatching a vast network of undercover officers and informants to track suspected terrorists. In Enemies Within, Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative journalists Matt Apuzzo and Adam Goldman for Associated Press reveal the effectiveness of the domestic spying plan. Based on hundreds of previously unpublished New York Police Department internal memos and exclusive interviews with intelligence sources, including 25-year FBI veteran Don Borelli who assisted with the book, they found that many of those strategies aren't even close to being useful, functional, or successful. As Assistant Special Agent in Charge in the New York Joint Terrorism Task Force (JTTF), Borelli was responsible for top investigations and counterterrorism missions that spanned the globe. Join Apuzzo and Borelli for an unbridled look at the breathtaking race to avert a second devastating terrorist attack on American soil.
Join the co-author and contributor for an informal chat and book signing.
Tickets: Free! No registration required. For more information visit www.spymuseum.org.

Tuesday, 01 October 2013, 6 pm - Washington, DC - "Witness to History: The Investigation of Robert Hanssen," at the International Spy Museum

"It is not an easy assignment to investigate a colleague." - Former FBI Director Louis J. Freeh on Hanssen
In 1979, FBI special agent Robert Hanssen volunteered to spy for Soviet Military Intelligence (GRU). To enrich his lifestyle and that of his family, the counterintelligence expert shared US intelligence community secrets, the identities of dozens of secret intelligence agents working for the US around the world, caused deaths of Russians aiding the U.S., and leaked the existence of an FBI eavesdropping tunnel under the Russian Embassy in DC. Hanssen remained anonymous to his Soviet handlers and to the US government for over 20 years. Building the case against Hanssen was a joint effort between the FBI, CIA, Department of State, and the Justice Department. Hanssen's arrest and conviction led to a full security review of the FBI, as Former FBI Director Louis J. Freeh stated, "These kinds of cases are the most difficult, sensitive and sophisticated imaginable" and require " counterintelligence at its very best." This inside look will explore the investigation from perspectives of individuals who knew and worked with Hanssen and were directly involved in the case.
Light hors d'oeuvres at 6:00PM. Panel begins at 6:45pm. Free! Registration required, space is limited! For more information visit www.spymuseum.org.

10 - 11 October 2013 - Charleston, SC - The Citadel - The Military College of South Carolina presents the Southeast Region Security & Intelligence Conference with the theme: "Securing Our Intelligence & Protecting Our Ports" 

Keeping with the tradition of The Citadel's historic role in defending the country, the Criminal Justice Department and the School of Humanities is pleased to announce the next chapter in Homeland Security. The Citadel will hold its first conference dedicated to Homeland Security and Intelligence. The conference will feature professionals and academics from various disciplines and agencies related to homeland security and intelligence. Keynote speakers include: Letitia Long, Director of the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency; Robert Cardillo, Deputy Director for Intelligence Integration, Office of the Director of National Intelligence; Stu Shea, Chief Operating Officer, SAIC, and many other senior officials and experts. http://www.citadel.edu/root/criminaljustice-sersi-conference
Conference Registration: https://foundation.citadel.edu/sersi

For Additional Events two+ months or greater....view our online Calendar of Events


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