AFIO Weekly Intelligence Notes #12-16 dated 22 March 2016

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CONTENTS

Section I - INTELLIGENCE HIGHLIGHTS

Section II - CONTEXT & PRECEDENCE

Section III - COMMENTARY

Section IV - Obituaries

Section V - Events

Upcoming AFIO Events

Other Upcoming Events

For Additional AFIO and other Events two+ months or more... Calendar of Events 

WIN CREDITS FOR THIS ISSUE: The WIN editors thank the following special contributors:  fm, kc, jm, mr, jg and fwr.  They have contributed one or more stories used in this issue.

The WIN editors attempt to include a wide range of articles and commentary in the Weekly Notes to inform and educate our readers. However, the views expressed in the articles are purely those of the authors, and in no way reflect support or endorsement from the WIN editors or the AFIO officers and staff. We welcome comments from the WIN readers on any and all articles and commentary.
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AFIO warmly thanks our speakers -- David Priess and Michael Hayden --
for their exceptional presentations at the AFIO National Luncheon
18 March 2016. 265 attendees participated.


"Intelligence in American Society"

Wednesday, 30 March 2016, 9am - 4pm

Austin, TX
Conference on hosted by the Intelligence Studies Project at the University of Texas at Austin

The Intelligence Studies Project invites you to attend the "Intelligence in American Society" conference. The luncheon keynote speaker is The Honorable Lisa O. Monaco, Assistant to the President for Homeland Security and Counterterrorism. Morning and afternoon panel and roundtable discussions will involve other current and former officials involved in intelligence oversight by all three branches of government, the media, and non-governmental organizations.

Agenda: 8:30 - 9am - Arrival and Registration (Coffee/Tea Served); 9-9:05am - Welcome Remarks by Stephen Slick, Intelligence Studies Project Director
9:05-10:15am -Executive Branch Supervision and Oversight of U.S. Intelligence, Moderator: Philip Bobbitt (Professor of Law, Columbia University), Joan Dempsey (former Executive Director of the President’s Foreign Intelligence Advisory Board); Brett Holmgren (National Security Council Senior Director for Intelligence Programs); Kenneth Wainstein (former Homeland Security Advisor and FBI General Counsel)
10:30-11:30am - Safeguarding Civil Liberties and Countering Terrorism; Moderator: Kenneth Wainstein; David Medine (Chairman, Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board); Rachel Brand (Member, Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board); Elisebeth Collins (Member, Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board)
Salon C, AT&T Conference Center
12-1:15pm - Luncheon Remarks by the Honorable Lisa Monaco, Assistant to the President for Homeland Security and Counterterrorism and Deputy National Security Advisor; Classroom 203, AT&T Conference Center
1:30-2:30pm - The Role of Congress in Overseeing National Security Institutions; Moderator: Admiral Bobby Inman (former Deputy Director of Central Intelligence); Honorable Michael Conaway (Member, House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence);
2:45 - 3pm Report on Policy Research Project for the Office of the Director of National Intelligence; LBJ School of Public Affairs Students
3-4pm - The Media’s Responsibilities in National Security Reporting; Moderator: Suzanne Kelly (Publisher and CEO of The Cipher Brief); William Harlow (former Director of Public Affairs at CIA); Eric Schmitt (Senior Writer, Terrorism and National Security, The New York Times); John Walcott (Professor, Georgetown University)
4pm - Conference Adjourns

Location: AT&T Executive Education and Conference Center Classroom 203
This event is co-sponsored by the Robert S. Strauss Center for International Security and Law, the Clements Center for National Security, UT Student Veterans Association, and the LBJ School of Public Affairs. Please contact us at intelligencestudies@austin.utexas.edu for more information on the Intelligence Studies Project and its public programs.
Registrations for the Conference and Keynote Lunch are now open here.



Section I - INTELLIGENCE HIGHLIGHTS

Pentagon to Open Major £200m Intelligence Centre in Britain.  The Pentagon will announce a major new £200m intelligence centre in Britain this week, which would act as the headquarters for all US military data in Europe and Africa, according to US media reports.

Known as the Joint Intelligence Analysis Centre, the facility will be located at the RAF Croughton, a US Air Force base near Milton Keynes, which already processes about a third of US military communications in Europe.

The proposed ultra-secure data centre would be the US headquarters for European and African military communications, employing up to 1,250 staff analysing intelligence from more than 50 countries. It is due to be completed next year.

Many of these functions are currently carried out at RAF Molesworth, the Cambridgeshire air base under the control of the US Air Force, which is being closed down as part of a cost-cutting drive by the American military.  [Read more:  Bawden/TheIndependent/20March2016]
 
CIA Names Intelligence Community IT Pro as CIO.  The Central Intelligence Agency has named John G. Edwards as its new chief information officer, an agency spokesman confirmed Friday.

Mr. Edwards, a veteran enterprise technology manager with a mix of public- and private-sector experience, took over the position in February, replacing former CIO Doug Wolfe, who is taking on a separate senior position within the agency, the spokesman said.

Mr. Wolfe had led agency IT since October 2013, driving efforts to develop a cloud service connecting the federal intelligence community.

That initiative sparked a legal dispute between cloud market giants Amazon.com Inc. and International Business Machines Corp. over a four-year $600 million cloud-computing contract. Amazon was eventually awarded the contract in late 2013.  [Read more:  Loten/TheWallStreetJournal/18March2016]

Ex-CIA Chief Michael Hayden: Yes, We Spy.  Former CIA chief Michael Hayden drew laughs from a banquet room full of former intelligence officers Friday when he was asked about an assertion by the current spy agency's head, John Brennan, that the CIA doesn't "steal secrets."

In a February 24 interview on National Public Radio that drew public ridicule from some former spies, Brennan was asked about hints from President Barack Obama that he'd like to get the CIA back to "its traditional roots - espionage, stealing secrets - reversing this trend we've seen toward a paramilitary force," as NPR interviewer Mary Louise Kelly put it.

"We don't steal secrets," Brennan responded. "We uncover, we discover, we reveal, we obtain, we elicit, we solicit. All of that."

That came as a surprise to former operatives who spent their careers stealing secrets.  [Read more:  Stein/Newsweek/19March2016]

German Triple Agent Sentenced to Eight Years in Prison.   A German court has sentenced an ex-agent of the BND intelligence agency to eight years in prison for delivering information to the CIA and Russian diplomats. The defendant claims he was motivated by "lust for adventure."

 A Munich judge declared the 32-year Markus R. guilty of treason and breach of official secrets, handing out a prison term of eight years on Thursday.

The former BND employee agent was charged with selling over 200 confidential documents to the CIA between 2008 and 2012, and receiving at least 80,000 euros in return. Most notably, Markus R. stole a file listing thousands of German agents abroad, including both their cover names and their real identities.

He also contacted the Russian consulate in Munich in the summer of 2014, and delivered three BND-documents to them. Agents from Germany's domestic intelligence service intercepted the correspondence and used it to set a trap.  [Read more:  Janjevic/DeutcheWelle/17March2016]

Arrest of Salah Abdeslam Could Be Intelligence Coup, Experts Say.  With the arrest of suspected Paris massacre plotter Salah Abdeslam, US counter-terrorism officials may have hit a mother lode of information about the terror group ISIS.

They believe the 26-year-old Islamist extremist, who was nabbed outside of Brussels on Friday after four months on the run, possesses knowledge of the inner workings of ISIS that could help them thwart other terror attacks, experts said Friday.

"The importance of Abdeslam's capture cannot be overstated," Rep. Adam Schiff (D-CA), the Ranking Member of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, said in a statement.

"He may be the only remaining member of the team that directly participated in terrorizing, and has been called the logistical chief for the group because he reportedly booked cars and hotel rooms, and ferried suicide bombers to their destinations," Schiff added.  [Read more:  Siemaszko/NBCNews/18March2016]

The United States government will declassify documents from US military and intelligence agencies related to Argentina's 1976-83 "Dirty War," the seven-year period when a military dictatorship cracked down on left-wing opponents, US officials said on Thursday.

The move coincides with President Barack Obama's visit to Argentina next week on the 40th anniversary of the 1976 coup that installed the dictatorship, which the United States initially supported. Argentina returned to democracy in 1983.

The declassification effort will include records from US law enforcement agencies, the Department of Defense, the Department of State and the presidential libraries at the National Archives.

It follows the declassification in 2002 of more than 4,000 State Department cables and other documents related to human rights abuses from the 1976-83 period.  [Read more:  Mason&Spetalnick/Reuters/17March2016]

Denmark's Military Intelligence Service Starts Hacker Academy to Train Spies.  Denmark's military intelligence agency says it's creating "a hacker academy" where to train IT specialists who, if they graduate, will be offered employment.

In a statement, the secretive Danish Defiance Intelligence Service (DDIS) says the small group who will be enrolled are "already are among the best in their field."

DDIS said Wednesday the academy "will not teach them how to hack" but will "target their mindset and skills so that they can be used" by the agency which spies outside Denmark's border.

The Copenhagen-based agency DDIS said the four-and-half month long school is to start in August.  [AP/17March2016]

Britain to Sign Deal Providing Ukraine With Military Training, Intelligence.  London will sign a new 15-year-long defense deal with Kiev, pledging to provide Ukraine with military training and intelligence to allegedly protect it from Russia, media reported Thursday.

Under the agreement, UK troops will take part in more joint drills and train larger numbers of Ukrainian troops, according to the paper. The countries will also share intelligence and expertise, it was reported in the article.

"The UK will stand firm with Ukraine as they defend their territorial integrity. This new defence agreement sets out that commitment as we enhance our training of Ukrainian armed forces," UK Defence Secretary Michael Fallon said, as quoted by The Telegraph newspaper.

UK troops have previously carried out drills in Ukraine, however, Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko has repeatedly called for more military aid from the Western states, including the United Kingdom.  [SputnikNews/18March2016]

National Cyber Intelligence Center at UCCS Has Interim Director.  Retired Army Lt. Gen. Ed Anderson has been named interim executive director for the National Cyber Intelligence Center while the national search finds a permanent leader for the Colorado Springs facility scheduled to begin operation April 1.

Anderson, 72, has spent the past five years as executive director of strategic, military, science, space and security initiatives for University of Colorado at Colorado Springs Chancellor Pam Shockley-Zalabak. He previously spent five years as a principal at Booz Allen Hamilton in Colorado Springs for military programs, cybersecurity and missile defense. Anderson retired from a 39-year Army career in 2004 that culminated with serving as deputy commander of US Northern Command and vice commander of the US Element, North American Aerospace Defense Command at Peterson Air Force Base.

He holds a bachelor's degree from the US Military Academy at West Point, NY, a master's degree in aeronautical engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta and a master's degree in national security and strategic studies from the Naval War College in Newport, RI.

Anderson was selected for the role by the center's five-person board, which includes Shockley-Zalabak, Gov. John Hickenlooper, Colorado Springs Mayor John Suthers, Colorado Technology Association CEO Eric Mitisek and ViaWest CEO Nancy Phillips. Anderson said he expects to serve in the interim role for about six months while the board, which will be expanded March 25 with 10 additional members, launches a national search for a permanent executive director. Details of the position are expected to be posted Wednesday on the UCCS website (www.uccs.edu).  [Read more:  Heilman/TheGazette/15March2016]

US Hit by 77,000 Cyber Attacks in 2015 - a 10 Percent Jump.  The US government was hit by more than 77,000 "cyber incidents" like data thefts or other security breaches in fiscal year 2015, a 10 percent increase over the previous year, according to a White House audit.

Part of the uptick stems from federal agencies improving their ability to identify and detect incidents, the annual performance review from the Office and Management and Budget said.

The report, released on Friday, defines cyber incidents broadly as "a violation or imminent threat of violation of computer security policies, acceptable use policies, or standard computer security practices." Only a small number of the incidents would be considered as significant data breaches.

National security and intelligence officials have long warned that cyber attacks are among the most serious threats facing the United States. President Barack Obama asked Congress last month for $19 billion for cyber security funding across the government in his annual budget request, an increase of $5 billion over the previous year.  [Read more:  Reuters/21March2016]


Section II - CONTEXT & PRECEDENCE

Technology's Impact on Intelligence Collection.  One of the most curious policies of former presidential candidate Martin O'Malley (D) was his steadfast insistence on greater human intelligence as a means of addressing shortfalls in the Middle East. "[W]e need to do a much better job as a nation of having human intelligence on the ground so that we know who the emerging next generation leaders are that are coming up to replace a dictator when his time on this planet ends," he said at the first Democratic debate in October. "We have failed as a country to invest in the human intelligence that would allow us to make not only better decisions in Libya, but better decisions in Syria today. And it's a huge national security failing."

CNN's post-debate fact-checking revealed O'Malley's incessant claims to be true. CNN's military analyst, Lt. Gen. Mark Hertling, has pointed out that funding for human intelligence (HUMINT) operations, compared to other intelligence collection, has been increasingly cut, fueling a debate within the intelligence community for the last 25 years.

Technology, in many regards, has changed intelligence collection. Unmanned aircraft serve as a dual signals intelligence (SIGINT) and image intelligence (IMINT) platform, keeping personnel out of harm's way while simultaneously providing a nearly unblinking eye on targets. Satellites orbit high above and safely collect images for analysis. SIGINT, consisting of intercepting communications, breaking codes and studying technical communications, among other tasks, is often, but not always, performed safely outside hot conflict zones.

Some have indicated that the apparent under-reliance on HUMINT has come at a price, resulting in various intelligence failures. High-tech intelligence has enabled operations in regions with no human presence, creating, some might say, a moral hazard of sorts.  [Read more:  Pomerleau/TheHill/18March2016]

French Historians Unveil WWII Secret Services' Archives.  French historians on Wednesday unveiled secret services' archives from World War II that offer a unique insight into underground operations led by both the Nazis and the French resistance - along with the individual paths taken by thousands of agents, including celebrities like French designer Coco Chanel.

Most of the letters, reports, cables and photos from the rival intelligence agencies of the French Resistance, the collaborationist Vichy regime and the German authorities remain unpublished. The documents, stored for years in the archives at the medieval castle of Vincennes, east of Paris, have not been explored by historians until recently.

They include details of operations led by German spies hunting members of the French resistance, the secret activities of London-based Gen. Charles De Gaulle's government and efforts to track war criminals.

The French secret services also had files on celebrities they deemed suspicious. Designer Coco Chanel's file includes a note written in Paris in November 1944.  [Read more:  AP/16March2016]

US and Britain Mark Anniversary of Toast That Built Intelligence Ties.  After a journey almost ended by a German aircraft attack, four American intelligence officers arrived late one night in February 1941 at the large, gloomy mansion in the English countryside that was home to British spy chiefs and code breakers.

Ushered inside, they began a trade in top-secret information that continues to this day, after being welcomed with a glass of sherry.

Seventy-five years later, that toast at Britain's wartime code-breaking center, known as Bletchley Park, is being held up as the start of one of the world's greatest intelligence-sharing relationships, one that remains at the center of the two countries' security ties.

But the anniversary falls at a time when those intelligence links are being questioned, after the revelations by Edward J. Snowden, the former National Security Agency contractor who leaked huge numbers of documents on the scale of electronic surveillance by the United States and its allies.  [Read more:  Castle/NewYorkTimes/15March2016]

Book Review: Playing to the Edge: American Intelligence in the Age of Terror, by Gen. Michael V. Hayden.  The image of the Central Intelligence Agency perhaps best known to the public is the shield in the marble entry concourse of the Original Headquarters Building, which features a quotation from St. John: "And ye shall know the truth and the truth shall make you free."

But up a stairway off to the left is another quotation, on a stylized mural of Lady Liberty, "We are the Nation's first line of defense. We accomplish what others cannot accomplish and go where others cannot go."

Such was the challenge accepted by Gen. Michael Hayden during a tumultuous decade in the heart of the intelligence community, first as director of the National Security Agency (NSA), then principal deputy director of National Intelligence, and finally, director of the CIA.

Gen. Hayden's account is both inspiring and frustrating. Inspiring, because he depicts a dedicated band of men and women determined to devise programs to protect the American public from terrorist attacks both at home and abroad.  [Read more:  Goulden/WashingtonTimes/16March2016]

Tale of Beersheba; Soon Israel's Desert City to Turn Into Cyber Hub.  Beersheba, Israel's southern desert capital, sits in an area that only four decades ago hosted little more than camels, sand, and dust.Today, however, the burgeoning urban sprawl is morphing into a tech hub that could rival - or complement - even Silicon Valley.

Israel's first prime minister, David Ben Gurion famously said that the future of Israel lies in the Negev, a desert located in southern Israel. Ben Gurion's prophetic words ring true today as Beersheba, Israel's southern capital, is morphing into a tech oasis.

Beersheba has all of the ingredients of a vibrant security technology ecosystem, including Ben-Gurion University with its graduate program in cybersecurity and Cyber Security Research Center, and the presence of companies such as EMC, Deutsche Telekom, Paypal, Oracle, IBM, and Lockheed Martin. It's also the future home of the INCB (Israeli National Cyber Bureau); offers a special income tax incentive for cyber security companies, and was the site for the relocation of the army's intelligence corps units.

The commercial sector has teamed up with military intelligence agencies and BGU to fight increasingly sophisticated cyber attacks.  [Read more:  Bidkar/TechStory/20March2016]

How the United States Learned to Cyber Sleuth: The Untold Story.  In early March of 1998, word came through that someone had hacked into the computers at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Ohio and was pilfering files - unclassified but sensitive - on cockpit design and microchip schematics. Over the next few months, the hacker fanned out to other military facilities. No one knew his location (the hopping from one site to another was prodigious, swift, and global); his searches bore no clear pattern (except that they involved high-profile military R&D projects).

Nine months earlier, when cyber-war was still a hypothetical matter, the Pentagon had staged a war game called Eligible Receiver, in which 25 members of an NSA Red Team, using commercially available gear, hacked into every Defense Department computer network, shutting down or distorting vital communications. Now, in an operation that an interagency task force dubbed Moonlight Maze, the Pentagon was experiencing the real thing, from a foreign power.

The hacker would log in to the open computers of university research labs to gain access to military sites and networks. He didn't dart in and out of a site, like some joyride hackers the government had seen; he was persistent; he was looking for specific information, he seemed to know where to find it, and, if his first path was blocked, he stayed inside the network, prowling for other approaches.

He was also remarkably sophisticated, employing techniques that impressed even the NSA teams that were following his moves. He would log on to a site, using a stolen username and password; when he left, he would rewrite the log so that no one would know he'd ever been there. Finding the hacker was touch-and-go: the analysts would have to catch him in the act and track his moves in real time; even then, since he erased the logs when exiting, the on-screen evidence would vanish after the fact. It took a while to convince some higher-ups that there had been an intrusion.  [Read more:  Kaplan/Politico/20March2016]

Target USA: Guarding the Gateway.  The Washington Field Office of the FBI (WFO) has been busy lately. In addition to the normal complement of criminal, espionage, terror, cyber and drug threats facing the nation's capital, the convergence of a swarm of new challenges face the 1,600 men and women who work there.

The confluence of rapidly evolving communications technology, the resurgence of aggression from hostile nation-states and rise of the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) has placed WFO in the center of growing storm.

The latest challenge emerged on March 14, when a 26 year-old Virginia man was apprehended in Iraq.

Mohamad Jamal Khweis, from Alexandria, was detained by Peshmerga forces near Sinjar for attempting to enter the Kurdistan Region from the Islamic State stronghold of Mosul.  [Read more:  Green/WTOP/21March2016]


Section III - COMMENTARY

Time for a New CIA?  Across the Central Intelligence Agency lobby from the iconic stars memorializing officers killed in the line of duty is a less well-known memorial.  It is an understated relief in honor of those foreign spies who risked and lost their lives to provide secret information to the United States.  It is a reminder that the CIA remains at its core, the nation's espionage arm.  Apparently, however, CIA Director John Brennan doesn't see it that way.

In what was otherwise a thoughtful interview with National Public Radio last week, CIA Director John Brennan expressed his personal view that the CIA should be not be viewed as a spy agency.  In the 24 February interview he said, "I don't support government spying... We don't steal secrets...  We uncover, we discover, we reveal, we obtain, we elicit, we solicit.  All of that."  What?  We don't steal secrets?  Is he joking?  Brennan has reportedly also made clear to the officers under his charge that he eschews the term espionage, and does not view the CIA as an espionage service.

Fortuitously, former CIA Director Michael Hayden's new book, Playing to the Edge was released on the same day that Brennan made his comments, and he seems more comfortable advocating for CIA's espionage role.  The title of Hayden's book is sports metaphor meant to highlight how he viewed his responsibility as the Director of the NSA and CIA.  That is, in an effort to secure the safety of the American people, US officials should use all of their authorities under the law.  They should use the entire playing field, even right up to the boundary.  In the book, Hayden refers to a speech in which he comments that "the American people expect CIA to use every inch we are given to protect her fellow citizens," adding his view that espionage is essential to a democracy.  Sadly, Brennan's remarks on the same day suggest that he does not see his authority in the same way.

While his comments might not resonate outside of the Intelligence Community, make no mistake, it is a long term danger to our security when the head of the nation's espionage organization says that he doesn't support spying.  It sends a chill through those who work in the shadows to keep us safe and makes them wonder if their boss has their back.  It also confirms the fears of many CIA employees and alumni that Brennan's recent efforts to restructure and change CIA culture were a furtive means of weakening the clandestine service.  [Read more:  Sipher/TheCipherBrief/2March2016]

Why Apple Should Comply With the FBI.  A national survey, conducted by the Pew Research Centre (February 18th-21st) found 51% of Americans agree that Apple should comply and assist with the FBI's investigation. In addition, among those who personally own an iPhone, 47% say that Apple should comply, while 43% were concerned about the implications that it might have on privacy rights. While the utility of surveys and their results always need to be scrutinised, these results undeniably offer a revealing insight into the views of the American public at large concerning the FBI's investigation.

So, should Apple help the FBI by reverse engineering their own software to access the suspect's iPhone? First, the FBI asserts that it only needs help unlocking this particular iPhone. Despite what the media and pro-privacy supporters are alleging, this will not necessarily create a precedent to hack all iPhones.

All that is required is for Apple to create a method to disable  the ‘self-destruct' mechanism present if the password is incorrectly entered enough times, therefore allowing them to ‘guess' the password an unlimited number of times with the use of software without the iPhone's contents being wiped.

The FBI is asking for access to one device, a device that belonged to a deceased terrorist in an attack that left 14 dead and 22 wounded. While it is not certain that information on the iPhone could lead to other terrorist cells, especially if those involved were ‘lone-wolf' actors, it holds greater implications.   [Read more:  Harris/GlobalRiskInsights/18March2016]

Japan Needs Better Security Intelligence.  Early in March, North Korea announced that it had finished work on miniaturizing a nuclear warhead that, if accurate, would enable nuclear blackmail of the US, South Korea and Japan. The veracity of Pyongyang's claim is questionable, but the larger threat posed by the North to Japan - and the region more broadly - should not be questioned. North Korea's string of recent provocations - highlighted by its fourth nuclear test and a subsequent missile test - reinforces the need to enhance Japan's security and intelligence capabilities.

 Aside from the sustained threat from North Korea, there are other evolving security challenges facing Japan. The most pressing of these is rapid military modernization in China, coupled with Beijing's assertiveness in the maritime domain. This is most acutely threatening to Japan's interests in the East China Sea, where Chinese vessels are constantly entering Japan's territorial waters around the disputed Senkaku islands, which China calls the Diaoyu islands. Of secondary, but not insignificant, importance are Chinese efforts to change the status quo in the South China Sea through land reclamation and gradual militarization of its alleged sovereign territory.

In addition to regional concerns, there are transnational threats that should capture Tokyo's attention. In four years, Japan will be in the final stages of its multi-faceted preparations to host the Tokyo Olympic Games in 2020. In addition to the pomp and ceremony and the diplomatic prestige that the Games bring, there will also be significant pressure on Japan's police, immigration, security and emergency management bodies to fend off potential threats and acts of terrorism and ensure the protection of its critical infrastructure and "soft targets" such as public places and malls.

These concerns also transcend targets within Japan, as Japanese companies and expatriates continue to operate and live overseas - sometimes in unstable environments with rapidly evolving security situations.  [Read more:  Miller/NikkeiAsianReview/18March2016]


Section IV - Obituaries
Former Mossad Director Meir Dagan.  Few are the individuals who have contributed to Israel's security like former Mossad Director Meir Dagan, who died Thursday, at the age of 71.

A decorated Israel Defense Forces officer, Dagan headed the IDF's Operations Branch and later the Counterterrorism Bureau before he was named head of the Israeli intelligence agency in 2002, a position he held until 2011.

Dagan was born Meir Huberman in Ukraine in 1945, to Polish Jewish parents who had fled Poland for the Soviet Union to escape the Holocaust. The family immigrated to Israel in 1950 and initially lived in an immigrant camp in Lod, before moving to Bat Yam, south of Tel Aviv.

Decades later, Dagan would keep a now-famous photograph of his maternal grandfather, Ber Erlich Sloshny, in his Mossad office. In the photo, Dagan's grandfather is kneeling before Nazi soldiers shortly before they shot him. This photo, he said, helped shape his operational strategy.  [Read more:  Cesana/IsraelHayom/22March2016]

Section V - Admin: Upcoming Events

Upcoming Events

AFIO EDUCATIONAL EVENTS IN COMING TWO MONTHS....

Tuesday, 12 April 2016, 11:30 a.m. - MacDill AFB, FL - The Florida Suncoast Chapter hosts Col Derek Harvey, USA(R) on "The Middle East, the Battle Within Islam and US Policy" - and chapter holds elections.

The Florida Suncoast Chapter's luncheon meeting features Col Derek Harvey (USA, ret), Co-Director of the Global Initiative at the University of South Florida, speaking on “The Middle East, the Battle Within Islam and US policy”.
The Chapter is also holding its elections.
Check-in starting at 1130 hours
Cash wine and soda bar open at 1130 hours for those who wish to come early to socialize
Opening ceremonies, lunch and business meeting at noon, followed by our speaker

Please RSVP to the Chapter Secretary at michaels@suncoastafio.org no later than noon on Tuesday, April 5, for yourself and any guests. You will receive a confirmation via email. If you do not get a confirmation, please contact the Chapter Secretary.
You must present your $20 check payable to “Suncoast Chapter, AFIO” (or cash) at check-in to cover the luncheon. If you make a reservation, and fail to cancel and get a cancellation confirmation by the response deadline and then don’t show up, you will be responsible for the cost of the luncheon.
Anyone with special AFIO Base Access should proceed to the Bayshore Gate. If you need directions, let us know.
Location: the Surf’s Edge Club, MacDill AFB, 7315 Bayshore Boulevard, MacDill AFB, FL 33621. Badge pick-up at 11:30 a.m.; program starts at noon.

14 May 2016 - Melbourne, FL - The AFIO Florida Satellite Chapter Hosts Dr. Joseph Finley, Jr. on Technical Surveillance and Countermeasures.

Dr. Finley, a member of the chapter, has an extensive background in federal law enforcement, academic administration, with 8 years in higher education executive management and educational leadership. He spent 28 years as a Special Agent of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), and in 1987, was assigned to the Special Operations Group of the FBI (17 years) and while assigned to the New York Division, actively conducted Technical Surveillance Countermeasure Sweeps (TSCM) and surreptitious entries. Upon being transferred to the Miami Division in 1996, he continued his assignment in the Special Operations Group.
He is an Expert Witness in the field of Forensic Geology and was assigned to the FBI Laboratory as an examiner. He has testified as an expert in federal, state, and local courts.
Dr. Finley holds a Doctor of Philosophy in Education Leadership with a Global Perspective, a Master of Science in Criminal Justice Administration with concentration in Forensic Science, and a Bachelor of Science in Geology.

To register for this event, please contact FSC Chapter President at afiofsc@afio.com.

Thursday, 2 June 2016 - San Francisco, CA - The AFIO Andre LeGallo Chapter hosts Dr. Matthew Brazil, Research Fellow, Jamestown Foundation

Mr. Brazil will discuss China’s Harder Line Against Foreign Influence - Implications for US Business.
Venue: United Irish Cultural Center, 2700 45th Avenue, San Francisco. 11:30am no host cocktail; meeting and luncheon at noon.
Register here.

Reservation and pre-payment is required before May 26, 2016. The venue cannot accommodate walk-ins.
Please contact Mariko Kawaguchi, Board Secretary at afiosf@aol.com or Mariko Kawaguchi, c/o AFIO, P.O. Box 117578, Burlingame, CA 94011 for questions.


Other Upcoming Events

23 - 24 March 2016 - McLean, VA - NMIA Classified Access Symposium 2016 - A Deep Look within the Intelligence Community (IC)

Send in your security clearances to NMIA (National Military Intelligence Association) so that you are ready to attend NMIA's SECRET/NOFORN Intelligence Symposium being held, as always, at the SECRET level. Event will feature senior military and defense intelligence agencies. Hear leaders discuss "A Deep Look within the Intelligence Community (IC)." Explores how these organizations plan to optimize intelligence effectiveness in one of the most challenging periods in US history. Particular emphasis on the "Big 5" and Service "2s" with focus on meeting dynamic and changing demands on intelligence in face of our country's fiscal challenges. This is an opportunity to hear more about budget, organizational changes, new programs and programs that are ending, future IC contractor workforce projections, current government workforce issues and initiatives, and anticipated improvements to acquisition activities as well as acquisition priorities.
Event location: MITRE Auditorium, 7525 Colshire Dr, McLean, Virginia. Symposium conducted at the SECRET/NOFORN security level.
Register here.

Wednesday, 30 March 2016, 9am - 4pm - Austin, TX - Conference on "Intelligence in American Society" hosted by the Intelligence Studies Project at the University of Texas at Austin

The Intelligence Studies Project invites you to attend the "Intelligence in American Society" conference. The luncheon keynote speaker is The Honorable Lisa O. Monaco, Assistant to the President for Homeland Security and Counterterrorism. Morning and afternoon panel and roundtable discussions will involve other current and former officials involved in intelligence oversight by all three branches of government, the media, and non-governmental organizations.

Agenda: 8:30 - 9am - Arrival and Registration (Coffee/Tea Served); 9-9:05am - Welcome Remarks by Stephen Slick, Intelligence Studies Project Director
9:05-10:15am -Executive Branch Supervision and Oversight of U.S. Intelligence, Moderator: Philip Bobbitt (Professor of Law, Columbia University), Joan Dempsey (former Executive Director of the President’s Foreign Intelligence Advisory Board); Brett Holmgren (National Security Council Senior Director for Intelligence Programs); Kenneth Wainstein (former Homeland Security Advisor and FBI General Counsel)
10:30-11:30am - Safeguarding Civil Liberties and Countering Terrorism; Moderator: Kenneth Wainstein; David Medine (Chairman, Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board); Rachel Brand (Member, Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board); Elisebeth Collins (Member, Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board)
Salon C, AT&T Conference Center
12-1:15pm - Luncheon Remarks by the Honorable Lisa Monaco, Assistant to the President for Homeland Security and Counterterrorism and Deputy National Security Advisor; Classroom 203, AT&T Conference Center
1:30-2:30pm - The Role of Congress in Overseeing National Security Institutions; Moderator: Admiral Bobby Inman (former Deputy Director of Central Intelligence); Honorable Michael Conaway (Member, House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence);
2:45 - 3pm Report on Policy Research Project for the Office of the Director of National Intelligence; LBJ School of Public Affairs Students
3-4pm - The Media’s Responsibilities in National Security Reporting; Moderator: Suzanne Kelly (Publisher and CEO of The Cipher Brief); William Harlow (former Director of Public Affairs at CIA); Eric Schmitt (Senior Writer, Terrorism and National Security, The New York Times); John Walcott (Professor, Georgetown University)
4pm - Conference Adjourns

Location: AT&T Executive Education and Conference Center Classroom 203
This event is co-sponsored by the Robert S. Strauss Center for International Security and Law, the Clements Center for National Security, UT Student Veterans Association, and the LBJ School of Public Affairs. Please contact us at intelligencestudies@austin.utexas.edu for more information on the Intelligence Studies Project and its public programs.
Registrations for the Conference and Keynote Lunch are now open here.

19 April 2016 , noon - 2 pm - McLean, VA - The Defense Intelligence Forum hosts David Shedd on "Intelligence and Maintaining Relevancy-Adjusting to an Ever-Changing World in the 21st Century."

Mr. David R. Shedd will speak on “Intelligence and Maintaining Relevancy-Adjusting to an Ever-Changing World in the 21st Century.” Mr. Shedd served in the U.S. government for nearly 33 years. Since leaving government in February 2015, he has been serving as a Heritage Foundation Distinguished Fellow, an Adjunct Professor at Patrick Henry College on intelligence and national security, an independent consultant, on several Corporate Boards, and supporter of several NGO initiatives.
In August 2014, he was named Acting Director of the Defense Intelligence Agency following four years’ service as its Deputy Director. From May 2007 to August 2010, he served as the Deputy Director for Policy, Plans, and Requirements for the Director of National Intelligence (DNI). From May 2005 to April 2007, Mr. Shedd served as Chief of Staff and later as Acting Director of the Intelligence Staff to the Director of National Intelligence. He held intelligence policy positions at the National Security Council (NSC) from February 2001 to May 2005. These positions involved serving as the NSC’s Special Assistant to the President and Senior Director for Intelligence Program and Reform and implementing intelligence reforms based on 9/11 Commission findings, the Intelligence Reform and Terrorism Prevention Act of 2004, and the weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD) Commission’s report to the President in March 2005. Earlier, he served in U.S. Embassies in Costa Rica and Mexico and a variety of senior management assignments at the Central Intelligence Agency.
Mr. Shedd holds a B.A. degree from Geneva College in Beaver Falls, Pennsylvania and a M.A. degree from Georgetown University’s School of Foreign Service in Latin American Studies. He was born in Bolivia and grew up in Latin America.

This forum will follow a modified Chatham House rule. You may use the information, but with the exception of speaker's name and subject, you may make no attribution. Everything will be off the record.
Location: Pulcinella Restaurant, 6852 Old Dominion Drive, McLean, VA. Registration starts at 11:30 AM, lunch at 12:00 PM.
Fees: Make reservations by April 19, 2016 by email to diforum@diaalumni.org. Include names, telephone numbers, and email addresses. For each attendee, choose among chicken cacciatore, tilapia puttanesca, lasagna, sausage with peppers, or fettuccini with portabella for your luncheon selection. Please send your luncheon selection with your reservation to reduce the wait time for your food.
Pay at the door with a check for $ 29.00 per person, payable to DIAA, Inc. Checks are preferred, but will accept cash; however, credit card payments are discouraged.

Friday, 29 April 2016 - Austin, TX - Gala Dinner Honoring Admiral Bobby R. Inman

A Gala Dinner Honoring Admiral Bobby R. Inman has been announced by University of Texas/Austin President Gregory L. Fenves to take place at the Four Seasons Hotel in Austin, Texas.
Presented by the Clements Center for National Security and the Strauss Center for International Security and Law, a gala dinner for Admiral Bobby R. Inman will feature former Secretary of Defense Robert Gates as the keynote speaker. Mr. Red McCombs will serve as the Honorary Gala Chair. Admiral Inman is on AFIO's Honorary Board.

To attend or for more information, contact the Clements Center at 512-471-2601 or explore this link.

Wednesday, 11 May 2016 - Washington, DC - Night of Heroes Gala - The PenFed Foundation 2016 Gala

PUT THIS DATE ON YOUR CALENDAR and then Join the PenFed Foundation, our partners and friends, Wednesday, 11 May 2016, as we honor those who lead the way in supporting our military and veterans. All proceeds benefit the PenFed Foundation, helping members of the military secure the financial future they deserve.
DINNER ★ HERO AWARDS PRESENTATION ★ LIVE AUCTION
Consider having your corporation or foundation be a sponsor for this worthwhile event. SPONSORSHIP LEVELS are as follows:
$100,000 Circle of Honor; $50,000 Legendary Hero; $25,000 Distinguished Hero; $10,000 Inspirational Hero; $5,000 Patriotic Hero; $1,000 Individual Sponsor
More details coming soon. More info here.
Location: Ronald Reagan Building & International Trade Center, Washington, DC.

15 - 18 May 2016 - Orlando, FL - 2016 USGIF GEOINT Symposium - "The GEOINT Revolution"

The United States Geospatial Intelligence Foundation's (USGIF) GEOINT 2016 Symposium takes place May 15-18 at the Gaylord Palms Resort & Convention Center in Orlando, FL. The GEOINT 2016 theme is "The GEOINT Revolution" ― in recognition of the advent and confluence of multiple technologies advancing geospatial intelligence and promoting its ubiquity.

Options include GEOINT Foreword, the pre-symposium science and technology-focused day, and some 60 hours of training and education sessions! To explore the main program and the options, visit here.


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