AFIO Weekly Intelligence Notes #18-17 dated 2 May 2017

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CONTENTS

Section I - INTELLIGENCE HIGHLIGHTS

Section II - CONTEXT & PRECEDENCE

Section III - COMMENTARY

Section IV - Obituaries

Obituaries

Section V - Events

Upcoming AFIO Events

Other Upcoming Events

For Additional AFIO and other Events two+ months or more... Calendar of Events 

WIN CREDITS FOR THIS ISSUE: The WIN editors thank the following special contributors:  pjk, mh, km, gh, mk, rd, fm, kc, jm, mr, jg, th and fwr. They have contributed one or more stories used in this issue.

The WIN editors attempt to include a wide range of articles and commentary in the Weekly Notes to inform and educate our readers. However, the views expressed in the articles are purely those of the authors, and in no way reflect support or endorsement from the WIN editors or the AFIO officers and staff. We welcome comments from the WIN readers on any and all articles and commentary.
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Recently released - AFIO's 2017 edition of...

Intelligence as a Career BookletIntelligence as a Career - with updated listings of colleges teaching intelligence courses, and Q&As on needed foreign languages, as well as the courses, grades, extracurricular activities, and behavioral characteristics and life experiences sought by modern US intelligence agencies.

AFIO's popular 56-page booklet reaches high school and college students considering careers in the US Intelligence Community. This is the fourth edition.
The publication is also popular with University Career Guidance Centers, professors and academic departments specializing in national security, and parents assisting children or grandchildren in choosing meaningful, public service careers.
This booklet is provided at no cost as a public service - online and in print - from the generosity of AFIO board, donors, and members. 20,000 printed copies of each edition are distributed. Many more are accessed online.
We thank all members and donors for their support which has made this possible.

2017 edition of Careers Booklet in PDF Format available here.

Also now online as a public service from the generosity of our members and donors is the entire 788-page AFIO's Guide to the Study of Intelligence, Peter Oleson, Editor, with a foreword by Dr. Robert M. Gates.
It can be accessed here.
If you wish, instead, to own a printed, bound copy, those are available here (AFIO) and here (Amazon).


     

2017 Night of Heroes Gala - PenFed Foundation
Thursday, 4 May 2017, 7 pm
- Washington, DC -

You are cordially invited to join the PenFed Foundation, our partners and friends, on Thursday, 4 May 2017, as we honor those who lead the way in supporting our military and veterans. All proceeds benefit the PenFed Foundation, helping members of the military secure the financial future they deserve. Location: Trump® International Hotel, 1100 Pennsylvania Ave, Washington, DC. VIP Sponsor Reception - 5:30 pm; General Reception - 6:00 pm; Dinner - 7:00 pm Black Tie
Please respond ASAP. Earlier deadline was 21 April 2017 but some late reservations accepted. For more information and to RSVP online, do so here.


Last few days to register for
AFIO's Spring Luncheon
before summer break
Friday, 12 May 2017
11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Register here while space remains.

Author Eva Dillon on
"Living Life Undercover in a CIA Family"
and join AFIO as we welcome and thank Marina, the granddaughter of Gen Polyakov present with us at this special event.

- and -

New York Times Washington Correspondent
David Sanger on
"Terrorism, Secret Wars, Nuclear Proliferation, and the Use of American Power"

The 11 a.m. speaker is Eva Dillon, author and magazine publisher, on Spies in the Family: An American Spymaster, His Russian Crown Jewel, and the Friendship That Helped End the Cold War. It is an engaging true-life memoir, of her CIA father, Paul Dillon, and the GRU officer who became a CIA agent whom her father handled - the highest ranking, longest serving asset the US had during the Cold War. It is also a memoir about both families growing up unknowingly as the children of spies.

David E. Sanger, Chief Washington Correspondent for the New York Times, speaks on "Terrorism, Secret Wars, Nuclear Proliferation, and the Use of American Power." His address starts at 1 p.m.

"A beautifully written, profoundly moving account of one of the most important US Intelligence sources ever run inside the Soviet Union. A cliff-hanger from beginning to end, Dillon's account is filled with espionage tradecraft and family drama - essential reading for intelligence professionals, memoir enthusiasts, and anyone fascinated by how spying really works." -- Peter Earnest, Executive Director, International Spy Museum

Event location is the Crowne Plaza (soon to be renamed DoubleTree-Hilton), Tysons Corner, VA, at 1960 Chain Bridge Rd, McLean, VA 22102.

Registration is here
. Do so quickly to assure seating.


"Codebreaking and the Battle of Midway" with Author/Historian Elliot Carlson
National Cryptologic Museum's Schorreck Lecture
Thursday, 25 May 2017 10 am - 11:30 am

Fort Meade, MD

2017 Henry F. Schorreck Lecture Speaker Series features Elliot Carlson, author of the celebrated biography of CMDR Joseph Rochefort (cryptologic hero of the Battle of Midway) - Joe Rochefort's War: The Odyssey of the Codebreaker Who Outwitted Yamamoto at Midway. Carlson's talk will be "Codebreaking and the Battle of Midway: When Cryptanalysis Came of Age." More about Carlson's book here.

On 3-7 June 1942, the US defeated Japan in the Battle of Midway, one of the most decisive battles in world history. The battle regained the initiative in the Pacific for the US after its setback at Pearl Harbor on 7 December 1941 while placing Japan on the strategic defensive from which it never fully recovered. On the 75th Anniversary of this US naval victory, Carlson discusses the pivotal role that intelligence played in it. In particular, the breaking of JN-25, the Japanese Imperial Fleet's operational code, by codebreakers at Station Hypo in Hawaii led by CMDR Joseph Rochefort USN.
Carlson holds degrees from Stanford University (MA) and the University of Oregon (BS).
He lives with his wife in Silver Spring, MD.

RSVP: Advanced registration required since this popular NCM Schorreck Lecture Series always has a full house. To not lose a spot, email history@nsa.gov and/or gjnedve@nsa.gov and provide the number of seats you will need. They will confirm your reservations and answer any questions.
Event location: National Cryptologic Museum: 9900 Colony Seven Rd, Fort Meade, MD. Directions here.
Plenty of convenient, free parking.


Book of the Week

Raven Rock: The Story of the U.S. Government's Secret Plan to Save Itself
-- While the Rest of Us Die

by Garrett M. Graff
(Simon & Schuster, May 2017)

Order here.


"... a colorful and frightening account of the American government's plans for doomsday, and the secret bunkers where official could go to save themselves. These early plans still have their counterparts today, and they reveal a lot about how warfighting doctrine evolved. Read it and be fascinated -- and a little scared." -- Walter Isaacson, author

Every day in Washington, DC, the blue-and-gold 1st Helicopter Squadron, codenamed "MUSSEL," flies over the Potomac River. As obvious as the Presidential motorcade, most people assume the squadron is a travel perk for VIPs. They're only half right: while the helicopters do provide transport, the unit exists to evacuate high-ranking officials in the event of a terrorist or nuclear attack on the capital. In the event of an attack, select officials would be whisked by helicopters to a ring of secret bunkers around Washington, even as ordinary citizens were left to fend for themselves. For sixty years, the US government has been developing secret Doomsday plans to protect itself, and the multibillion-dollar Continuity of Government (COG) program takes numerous forms -- from its plans to evacuate the Liberty Bell from Philadelphia to the plans to launch nuclear missiles from a Boeing-747 jet flying high over Nebraska. In Raven Rock, Graff describes the inner workings of the 650-acre compound (called Raven Rock) just miles from Camp David, as well as dozens of other bunkers the government built its top leaders during the Cold War, from the White House lawn to Cheyenne Mountain in Colorado to Palm Beach, Florida, and the secret plans that would have kicked in after a Cold War nuclear attack to round up foreigners and dissidents and nationalize industries.
Equal parts a presidential, military, and cultural history, Raven Rock tracks the evolution of the government plan and the threats of global war from the dawn of the nuclear era through the War on Terror.

"A detailed exploration of the United States' doomsday prepping during the Cold War . . . Graff, a former editor of Washingtonian and Politico magazines, covers every technicality of the construction of underground bunkers and secret command posts, every war game and exercise, every debate over presidential succession planning and continuity of government, every accident that left us verging on nuclear war. . . . But if there is anything that Raven Rock proves with grim certitude, it is that we have little idea how events would have unfolded in a superpower nuclear conflict, and that technological limits, human emotion and enemy tactics can render the most painstaking and complex arrangements irrelevant, obsolete, or simply obscene." -- Carlos Lozada, The Washington Post

The book may be ordered here.


HOLD THE DATE: AFIO's 2017 National Intelligence Symposium

"Succeeding in the Open – The Future of GEOINT "

will be at the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency
and elsewhere (TBA),
Thursday & Friday, 28 to 29 September 2017.
Hotel: DoubleTree-Hilton, Tysons Corner, VA

Tentative Agenda: • Opening Remarks by AFIO President; • NGA Overview and Q&A; • Video Presentation; • NGA Leadership Remarks (D/NGA or DD) - Includes GEOINT Strategy and Functional Management; • Lunch (with museum tours, NGA store, and group photo). Presentations/Panels on: • KH 8 Declassification; • Pathfinder (unclassified research to solve intel problems); • Commercial GEOINT Activity; and • the Small Satellite Revolution.

Arrive Wednesday evening, 27 September to overnight at the hotel to be ready early Thursday, 28 September, for coach service to NGA for all day conference including visit to their new museum. Welcome by NGA Director Robert Cardillo. Friday activities TBA. Friday evening is our "Spies in Black Ties" banquet.
Hotel: DoubleTree-Hilton, Tysons Corner, VA [formerly the Crowne Plaza], at 1960 Chain Bridge Rd, McLean, VA 22102. Details, event registration and hotel room registration links to be sent to all current members in coming weeks. Early phone-only room registrations can be made at 1-877-865-1877 at $119/nite.


Section I - INTELLIGENCE HIGHLIGHTS

SpaceX Launches Spy Satellite for US Intelligence Agency.  SpaceX just launched a mysterious spy satellite toward orbit for a US intelligence agency.

Elon Musk's commercial rocket company made a successful liftoff Monday morning from Kennedy Space Center at Cape Canaveral, Florida.

The mission was supposed to happen Sunday, but SpaceX delayed its flight because of a sensor problem on the bottom part of the rocket.

The customer for the launch was the National Reconnaissance Office, a US government agency that develops and maintains spy satellites.  [Read More:  cnnwire/ktla/1May2017]

NSA Halts Collection of Americans' Emails About Foreign Targets.  The National Security Agency said Friday that it had halted one of the most disputed practices of its warrantless surveillance program, ending a once-secret form of wiretapping that dates to the Bush administration's post-Sept. 11 expansion of national security powers.

The agency is no longer collecting Americans' emails and texts exchanged with people overseas that simply mention identifying terms - like email addresses - for foreigners whom the agency is spying on, but are neither to nor from those targets.

The decision is a major development in American surveillance policy. Privacy advocates have argued that the practice skirted or overstepped the Fourth Amendment.

The change is unrelated to the surveillance imbroglio over the investigations into Russia and the Trump campaign, according to officials familiar with the matter. Rather, it stemmed from a discovery that NSA analysts had violated rules imposed by the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court barring any searching for Americans' information in certain messages captured through such wiretapping.  [Read More:  Savage/nytimes/28April2017]

Gambia's Intelligence Community Expresses Eyebrows Over the Appointment of Ousainou Darboe's Nephew ASP Kanteh to Head State House Intelligence.  Some members of Gambia's intelligence community are increasingly concern about the mediocre approach taken by the Barrow administration to politicize intelligence collection, and gathering for national security purposes, the Freedom Newspaper can reveal. The appointment of Assistant Superintendent of police (ASP) Muhammed Kanteh, a Nephew of Foreign Minister Ousainou Darboe, to head the State House Intelligence Division, has been faulted in some quarters within the intelligence community. Mr. Kanteh, used to work at the police License Office, and has no intelligence background, sources said.

Mr. Barrow is now occupying the former office of Gambia's co-president General Saul Badjie at the State House. He has some "Intel agents" working under him. Mr. Kinteh, has been referred to as one of the most powerful security officials in the Gambia today - given his family relationship with opposition leader and Foreign Minister Ousainou Darboe.

"These people are playing with the lives of Gambians. How can they entrust the State House Intel gathering and national security to an intelligence novice in the person of ASP Kanteh. Kanteh used to work at the police Licensing office. He has no intelligence training or background. He has been offered the job because he is Ousainou Darboe's  Nephew.  This is absurd to say the least. This administration is politicizing intelligence," said our source.

Mr. Kanteh is said to be a gentleman of the highest order, but source intimated that he should have been assigned somewhere outside intelligence collection and processing. Mr. Kanteh is a lawyer by profession.  [Read More:  freedomnewspaper/1May2017]

A Former Top NSA Lawyer Is Joining the Senate's Trump-Russia Probe.  The former head of intelligence law at the National Security Agency (NSA), April Doss, has been hired to work on the Senate Intelligence Committee's investigation into Russia's interference in the 2016 election, her law firm confirmed in a press release on Wednesday.

Doss, who spent over a decade at the NSA and now chairs the Cybersecurity and Privacy practice at  Saul Ewing, LLP, will serve as the committee's special counsel as it examines "allegations that Russia participated in a disinformation campaign intended to benefit President Donald Trump, and claims of potential collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia," the firm said.

Doss will join the committee on May 1.

The former NSA attorney testified before the House Judiciary Committee on March 1, 2017 in a public hearing over the reauthorization of Section 702 of the FISA Amendments Act, according to her firm, which hired her one year ago.   [Read More:  Bertrand/businessinsider/26April2017]

CIA's New "Mayor" Comes From Finance Firm, Not Intelligence World.  Brian Bulatao, a private equity investor from Dallas, is slated to become the No. 3 official at the CIA, according to current and former intelligence officials. 

The job has traditionally, but not always, been filled by career intelligence officers. It is not subject to Senate confirmation. 

The position has long been known as "executive director," but CIA Director Mike Pompeo is changing the title to "chief operating officer." The executive director has been called the CIA's "mayor," responsible for the internal workings of the agency that employs an estimated 20,000 personnel worldwide.

Bulatao is no stranger to Pompeo, the former Kansas congressman who was named director by President Trump. The two were West Point classmates, graduating in 1986, and later business partners, according to officials. Pompeo, first in his class at the academy, graduated from Harvard Law School. Bulatao was an Army Ranger who served as a paratrooper, and earned an MBA from Harvard Business School.  [Read More:  Windrem/nbcnews/27April2017]

CIA Director in Seoul for Meetings As North Korea Repeats Nuclear Threats.  CIA Director Mike Pompeo is in South Korea holding talks with top officials and military leaders, as tensions remain elevated on the Korean Peninsula.

South Korea's Yonhap news agency reported he arrived over the weekend and already held meetings with his counterpart in South Korea's National Intelligence Service. It also cited sources as saying the CIA chief met with other officials at the presidential palace in Seoul.

The unannounced visit to South Korea comes as tensions remain high in the region after a failed ballistic test early Saturday by the regime led by Kim Jong Un. It comes as a carrier strike group led by the USS Carl Vinson holds drills off the peninsula with South Korea.

There are concerns the 33-year-old leader may conduct the country's sixth nuclear test at any time.  [Read More:  Daniels/cnbc/1May2017]

French Intelligence Says Assad Forces Carried Out Sarin Attack.  French intelligence has concluded that forces loyal to Syrian President Bashar al-Assad carried out a sarin nerve gas attack on April 4 in northern Syria and that Assad or members of his inner circle ordered the strike, a declassified report showed.

The chemical weapons attack on the town of Khan Sheikhoun killed scores of people, according to a war monitor, Syrian opposition groups and Western countries. It prompted the United States to launch a cruise missile strike on a Syrian air base, its first deliberate assault on the Assad government in the six-year-old conflict.

Assad has said in two media interviews since April 4 that the evidence of a poison gas attack was false and denied his government had ever used chemical weapons.

The six-page French document, seen by Reuters, and drawn up by France's military and foreign intelligence services - said it reached its conclusion based on samples they had obtained from the impact strike on the ground and a blood sample from a victim.  [Read More:  Irish/reuters/26April2017]

Russian Navy Intelligence Ship Sinks After Collision With Freighter Off Turkish Coast.  A Russian naval intelligence ship sank Thursday after colliding with a merchant freighter in foggy conditions on the Black Sea near Istanbul, the Turkish coast guard said. All 78 crew members on the Russian vessel were rescued.

The crew of the freighter Youzarsif H, a Togo-flagged ship traveling from Romania to Jordan with a cargo of 8,800 sheep, was unharmed, and the ship suffered slight damage to its bow, according to local media reports.

In Moscow, Russia's Defense Ministry issued a statement confirming that the vessel, the Liman, went down after the collision tore a hole in the hull below the waterline.

Russian officials did not immediately provide any information about the Liman's mission. The Russian state-run Sputnik news agency reported in 2016 that the Liman had been deployed in the Black Sea to monitor the Sea Breeze naval exercises involving Ukraine and several NATO countries, including the United States. Russian officials had complained that the exercises were a provocation.  [Read More:  Fahim, Roth/washingtonpost/27April2017]

Heads of Israeli Intelligence Community Against Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu.  Approximately a year ago, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu established the National Cyber Authority. The decision was met with strong opposition from Israel's security authorities- the Mossad, the Shin Bet, the IDF and the Ministry of Defense.

The heads of the intelligence and defense were promised that the cyber authority would be established in full accordance with them. However, when they received the legislative draft for the establishment of the authority, they discovered something different.

Last week, Director of Mossad Yossi Cohen, Shin Bet Chief Nadav Argaman, Deputy IDF Chief of the General Staff Yair Golan and Defense Ministry Director General Udi Adam wrote a letter to Netanyahu and the Cabinet Ministers and claimed: "The legislative proposal, as it is, constitutes a grave violation of Israel's security management."

"The drafted law seeks to grant extensive powers to the cyber authority, the purpose of which is not clearly defined," they emphasized in the letter. "It is liable to cause serious damage to the core security activity of the defense community in the cyber field."  [Read More:  Gilenson/jerusalemonline/24April2017]

Trump's Pick for Top CIA Lawyer Calls for Greater Cyber, Contractor Scrutiny.  President Donald Trump's pick to run the Central Intelligence Agency's legal department earned bipartisan support on Wednesday after promising to address some of the cybersecurity concerns voiced by the intelligence community's leadership.

The Senate Select Committee on Intelligence approved Courtney Simmons Elwood to serve as the CIA's general counsel, a role that ranking member Mark Warner (D-Va.) said would uniquely position her at the "critical intersection between intelligence and policy-making."

"The intelligence community needs to find ways to access the communications of our adversaries while protecting the privacy rights and American commercial ingenuity. I believe we cannot tie the hands of our technology leaders by unilaterally disarming them with possible security loopholes," Warner said. "The rapid change of information technology enables significant sharing of classified information and we must work to find ways to have the appropriate level of sharing."

Elwood, a partner with the law firm Kellogg, Hansen, Todd, Figel & Frederick, told lawmakers she would work with CIA Director Mike Pompeo and Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats in shoring up the intelligence community's contractor workforce and addressing emerging cyber threats.  [Read More:  Heckman/federalnewsradio/27April2017]

CTIC Synchronizes Service.  A new defensive cyberspace operations facility at Joint Base San Antonio will boost the 35th Intelligence Squadron's ability to meet growing demands for analysis of intelligence coming from multiple sources. Although located in Texas, personnel at the Cyberspace Threat Intelligence Center (CTIC) will support operations worldwide.

In 2015, the squadron's support to the defensive cyberspace operations community increased by more than 300 percent, which led to the need for a new facility, says Lt. Col. Matthew Castillo, USAF, commander, 35th Intelligence Squadron.

"The squadron took on an increase in personnel to provide intelligence analysis, leveraging multiple sources, in order to enable the defense of Air Force networks. This increase of personnel, coupled with continued advancement of threats against these networks, drove the squadron to adopt a new organizational construct for today's challenges - the CTIC," Col. Castillo explains.

With the opening of the facility and the reorganized staff structure, squadron members can now synchronize and prioritize intelligence activities. They will be able to better manage cross-organizational capabilities and information sources, improving intelligence reporting, the colonel says.  [Read More:  Lawlor/afcea/28April2017]



Section II - CONTEXT & PRECEDENCE

The Last CIA Officer in Saigon Bitterly Marks Its Chaotic End.  Time has done little to dull the anger of James Parker, the last CIA officer to evacuate Vietnam, as the world this weekend marks the anniversary of the US evacuation of the Saigon embassy just ahead of advancing North Vietnamese forces in 1975.

When South Vietnam's capital fell, the intelligence officer's two best military sources committed suicide and the actions of an American diplomat endangered the lives of escaping diplomats and CIA personnel, the 73-year-old Mr. Parker recalled in an interview. Off the coast of Danang, panicked South Vietnamese who evacuated onto a US ship shot, stabbed, raped, trampled and executed each other during onboard revenge attacks.

But much of his anger targets Mr. Parker's fellow Americans, as they stumbled through one of the low points of the postwar era in American history.

"As for my experiences back in Vietnam at the end, [I remember] the absolute chickens--the character of the men in the US Embassy in Saigon, how they were so petty and self-indulgent, so pedantic and so distant from the fighting," Mr. Parker said in an interview with the Washington Times, an attitude that he says contributed to the ignominious defeat.  [Read More:  Ehrlich/washingtontimes/28April2017]

Defense Intelligence Agency's ‘Shark Tank' Helps Startups Pitch Spy Apps.  Setting: A high-tech military facility just outside of Washington, DC - the headquarters of the Defense Intelligence Agency, or DIA. Anshuman Roy, the president and founder of Rhombus, a data analytics company, is in a large open space outfitted with computers, whiteboards, and cameras. It looks a bit like a young hacker space of the sort that began popping up in San Francisco in 2007 and, before that, in Europe. 

Roy stands in front of a digital projection of a map of Syria. Green and red areas show where his proprietary neural network has determined that unrest or violence is likely imminent. Analysts at DIA can use the tool to look at "precursors to instability," he explains to a small audience.

The analysts can refine the results by adding or subtracting variables - local economic factors, ethnic and religious makeup, even fresh water availability or food price inflation. This, he explains, is a huge improvement over previous models that relied on just four variables computed by humans. Rhombus's cloud-based neural net can draw in much more information to help analysts make better predictions.

"It doesn't give directions. It suggests to help override cognitive bias," he says.  [Read More:  Tucker/defenseone/25April2017]

Woodward Gives Talk on Civil War Espionage.  John D. Woodward, Jr., Professor of the Practice of International Relations at the Frederick S. Pardee School of Global Studies, gave a presentation on "Intelligence Activities of the Blue and Gray during the Civil War," before members of the Military Historical Society of Massachusetts and the Union Club in Boston on April 25, 2017.

In his speech, Woodward focused on three key intelligence areas. First, he discussed, from the Union's perspective, the situation in Washington, DC at the outbreak of the war.  In essence, one-quarter of DC's citizens were pro-Confederacy and the DC militias were of suspect loyalty. From the Union perspective, the nation's capital was riddled with spies.

The US Army Commander, the 74-year old General Winfield Scott, known as "Old Fuss and Feathers" was well aware of these intelligence realities, according to Woodward.

"Scott had a lot to fuss about," Woodward said. "He was badly handicapped in his attempts to establish a counterintelligence capability because his Quartermaster who would pay the spies was Joseph E. Johnston and his Adjutant General who would handle the administration of the spies was Samuel Cooper, both of whom would soon resign their commissions and become CSA Generals."  [Read More:  bu/28April2017]

Weather Station Supports Intelligence, Surveillance, Reconnaissance Mission.  Dropping bombs on targets in Syria and Iraq during combat missions supporting Operation Inherent Resolve requires a complex array of information, including intelligence gathered well in advance of the combat sortie.

This intelligence often is gathered by coalition partners flying out of the 407th Air Expeditionary Group, but an unseen force is providing those units with information critical to their mission.

"When you are watching for vehicle traffic or personnel traffic, you are not looking for something that is very big," said Air Force Master Sgt. Tommy Tam, the 407th Expeditionary Operation Support Squadron superintendent and weather station flight chief. "You have to get into some very fine detailed imagery, and if a cloud is blocking that, then it impacts the mission."

Tam said that even seemingly benign weather conditions can affect operations.  [Read More:  Wilson/defense/1May2017]

BU Hosts Chief of CIA, Former CIA Officer to Describe Experiences on 9/11.  The Frederick S. Pardee School of Global Studies at Boston University hosted Mary Margaret Graham, who was the chief of the CIA office in New York City on Sept. 11, 2001, along with former CIA officer Joseph Wippl, who is also an international relations professor at BU, on Monday.

In a conference-style setting, Graham discussed the tragedy of 9/11, its effects and intelligence's role in mediating and resolving the conflict, as well as shared her own experience working in the intelligence field.

Graham worked with the CIA for 29 years. From 1999 to 2001, she served as chief of the Directorate of Operation's National Resources Division, and in 1998, she served as the deputy chief of the Directorate of Operations Europe Division. She was responsible for overseeing 16 agencies of the Intelligence Collection throughout her time and was the recipient of many highly respected medals honoring her dedication to intelligence.

Jennifer Kelley, a second-year graduate student in Pardee, attended the lecture. She said she was moved by Graham's presentation.  [Read More:  Finkel/dailyfreepress/25April2017]

Bookmarks: 'CIA Brat' Describes Father's Shadowy Service.  Like a number of American children during the Cold War, Carol F. Cini spent a lot of time abroad as his father served his country. Born in Paris (the F. stands for "Francois"), the younger Cini spent time as a boy in Paris, the Netherlands, Saigon and Honduras.

But he wasn't an Army brat. Cini's father, Walter T. Cini, was a veteran officer with the US Central Intelligence Agency.

"Dad was very secretive about his work," said Cini from his home near Southport. It took the son two years of combing records and family letters to reproduce his father's story - a story he tells in The Spy and His CIA Brat (CreateSpace, $14.95 paperback). The self-published volume is available through Amazon.com.

The son of an Italian immigrant grocer, Cini avoided the family business to study abroad, in Italy, Spain and at the Sorbonne in Paris. With his gift for languages, he was quickly picked up by the Army's Military Intelligence Service, at first in a special unit interrogating German prisoners of war. He then moved into the OSS, the CIA's wartime predecessor, and in 1947 to the CIA itself. [Read more:  Steelman/StarNews/29April2017]


Section III - COMMENTARY

How Michael Flynn Got a Security Clearance Despite so Many Red Flags.  Years back, when I was researching a story about how the CIA had overlooked Russian moles in its ranks, I applied for my own security file. I wanted to know what investigators had dug up when they delayed granting me a top-secret clearance for a slot in Army Intelligence during the Vietnam War. As it turned out, they had discovered an alarming piece of information: I had been fired from a summer job years earlier at Sugarman's shoe store in Hyannis, Massachusetts.

According to my declassified file, the agents rushed down to Cape Cod to interview the proprietor. Mr. Sugarman gave the agents the shocking story: He'd fired me because I "was no good with women's shoes." That derogatory item, along with a one-time visit to my campus shrink the previous year for counseling after my girlfriend dumped me, held up my clearance for weeks.

If only the FBI had been so zealous in the case of Michael Flynn, the ousted White House national security adviser. More wreckage from Flynn's career surfaced on April 25, when the Republican and Democratic leaders of the House Oversight Committee  said he had failed to disclose what had been  reported for months: payments totaling more than $65,000 in 2015 from companies linked to Moscow, including its propaganda arm, Russia Today, or RT. Flynn had also failed to register as a foreign agent after accepting a  $600,000 contract with a lobbyist linked  not only to Turkish strongman  Recep Tayyip Erdogan but also to Russian President Vladimir Putin. "As a former military officer, you simply cannot take money from Russia, Turkey or anybody else," said Representative Jason Chaffetz of Utah, chairman the committee, "and it appears as if he did take that money. It was inappropriate, and there are repercussions for a violation of law."

The obvious question is: How did Flynn get a security clearance? The foreign payments were just the latest vexing chapter in the retired general's vexatious career. In 2014, he'd been forced out as head of the Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) for his "chaotic" and "toxic" management style, according to several reports. He had an affinity for conspiracy theories and made-up "Flynn facts," his closest aides said. And yet, even as  reports piled up after the November election about Flynn's Moscow visits and secret meetings with Russian Ambassador Sergey Kislyak, there he was in January, at President Donald Trump's side, with unfettered access to the government's most closely held secrets.  [Read More:  Stein/newsweek/28April2017]

Law Enforcement and Intelligence Agencies Are Not Synonymous.  With the ongoing threat of ISIS-inspired terrorist attacks, active shooter incidents and non-financially motivated cyber-attacks; there has been increased public discussion about how law enforcement and intelligence keeps tabs on suspected threats.

While similar public and political discourse led to an end to the NSA's metadata collection program, it would be important to clarify the difference between the roles of law enforcement and intelligence agencies, and their capabilities in today's overlapping war on terrorism.

A major problem when addressing this issue lies in the fact that Americans have been fed a steady diet of television and movie plots centered on CIA operations on American soil. These fictional stories, such as the Showtime cable drama Homeland, are so pervasive that most Americans are totally unaware that the CIA has no charter to operate on American soil.

The side effect of this fictionalization of real agencies and threats is that most Americans fail to realize that the work of our foreign intelligence agencies is quite different than the work of law enforcement.  [Read More:  Mannes/thehill/28April2017]

Who Is Publishing NSA and CIA Secrets, and Why?  There's something going on inside the intelligence communities in at least two countries, and we have no idea what it is.

Consider these three data points. One: someone, probably a country's intelligence organization, is dumping massive amounts of cyberattack tools belonging to the NSA onto the Internet. Two: someone else, or maybe the same someone, is doing the same thing to the CIA.

Three: in March, NSA Deputy Director Richard Ledgett described how the NSA penetrated the computer networks of a Russian intelligence agency and was able to monitor them as they attacked the US State Department in 2014. Even more explicitly, a US ally - my guess is the UK - was not only hacking the Russian intelligence agency's computers, but also the surveillance cameras inside their building. "They [the US ally]  monitored the [Russian] hackers as they maneuvered inside the US systems and as they walked in and out of the workspace, and were able to see faces, the officials said."

Countries don't often reveal intelligence capabilities: "sources and methods."  Because it gives their adversaries important information about what to fix, it's a deliberate decision done with good reason.  And it's not just the target country who learns from a reveal. When the US announces that it can see through the cameras inside the buildings of Russia's cyber warriors, other countries immediately check the security of their own cameras.  [Read More:  Schneler/lawfareblog/27April2017]

Courage, Integrity and Accountability at the CIA.  Throughout my career, I have had the privilege of working  with literally hundreds of senior civilian leaders - members of the Defense Intelligence Senior Executive Service when I was Director of NSA; executives of the intelligency community's Senior National Intelligence Service, which I helped create as Principal Deputy Director of National Intelligence; and finally, executives of the CIA's Senior Intelligence Service when I was director of CIA - through  some of our nation's most challenging times.

The challenges facing our nation may have changed over time, but they are certainly no less difficult today. Thus, while those of us who were on the front lines of the Cold War may have confronted a world more dangerous than today's, none of us have lived and led in a world more complicated or immediate.

What does that mean for senior leaders in government? What special traits will be required for success in the future? Over the course of my career in public service, I have had the opportunity to see senior civilian officers (yes, that's how we see them in the IC, as officers, with all that that label connotes) at their very best, more often than not in high-stakes, life-or-death situations, and I've had a chance to reflect on what makes them successful.

In my "second life," the one beyond government, I am often asked to speak publicly about global threats. I usually begin by reminding the audience that, as bad as things seem to be, I have actually seen the world more dangerous than it is today. I remind them of the Cuban Missile Crisis, of Soviet and American armor facing off at Checkpoint Charlie in Berlin, and of the US going to DEFCON 3 during the October 1973 war in the Middle East.  [Read More:  Hayden/govexec/27April2017]



Section IV - Obituaries

Obituaries

Howard Phillips Hart, 76, [born Howard Lester Phillips], former CIA Chief of Station, Islamabad, Pakistan, former Chief, Paramilitary Operations Division, played role in activities made famous by movie "Charlie Wilson's War," died 30 April 2017. Hart had almost eighteen years of service in the Middle East and South Asia, involved in covert "paramilitary" operations, including the war against the Soviet Union in Afghanistan. He was also involved in gathering information on weapons of mass destruction, both chemical/biological and nuclear. After he retired from CIA he established a business consultancy.

He attended Cornell University and the University of Arizona, and had both B.A. (Honors) and M.A. degrees in Oriental Studies and Political Science. He lived with his family in the Philippines, including internment by the Japanese Imperial Army in the Philippines for the duration WWII. A career Near East Division officer in CIA's Clandestine Service, Mr. Hart's overseas postings included five years in India; two years as a Chief of Station (COS) in the Persian Gulf; a three year posting in Iran before, during and after the Iranian Revolution (where he was Chief of Station after the Shah fled and the American Embassy was overrun by Khomeini elements); three years as COS in Pakistan during the Soviet occupation of Afghanistan; and COS, Germany in the period leading up to the collapse of Communism. His primary intelligence specialties during these years were Soviet military weaponry, counter-terrorism, and weapons of mass destruction. His Washington assignments included a tour as Director of CIA's paramilitary Special Operations Division, and two years creating and managing a sensitive high-level espionage initiative. In 1989, at the direction of President George Bush, he established the Foreign Intelligence Community's "Crime and Counternarcotics Center," which became the model for a number of inter-agency "Centers" addressing specific "hard target" areas. He was the senior Intelligence Community advisor to the NSC and the President on International Narcotics matters, and was responsible for a number of major new initiatives against key South American narcotics organizations.
Immediately following his return from Iran in the fall of 1979, and the seizure of the U.S. Embassy in Tehran, he was assigned to the Pentagon's "Iran Rescue Mission Joint Task Force" as the senior intelligence advisor to the Task Force commander. In 1980, Hart established and managed a CIA in-country support structure for the ill-fated Iran Rescue Mission, and accompanied the mission on deployment. As Chief of Station (COS) Islamabad, Hart established and led the CIA's covert paramilitary operation - the largest ever mounted by CIA - against the Soviet Union's military occupation of Afghanistan. As COS Germany, Hart oversaw all US military intelligence operations in that country. After retirement from CIA 1991, Mr. Hart operated a world-wide intelligence network for U.S. corporate clients. He conducted (covert) sensitive due diligence investigations focused on foreign companies and their key personnel; and did covert searches for illegal and/or stolen assets maintained overseas. On several occasions he was asked by U.S. clients operating overseas to provide security assessments/surveys of their offices/installations, and subsequently designed active defensive programs for those clients.
Hart was a U.S. Martial Arms weapons collector. He received numerous CIA medals. He published two books of his Agency experiences: Intelligence Thoughts: Afghanistan and Iran. [2010, Lulu.com]; and A Life for a Life A Memoir: My Career in Espionage Working for the Central Intelligence Agency [2015, Lulu.com].
He is survived by his wife, Jean, and other family. [AFIO obit. No formal obituary has appeared.]

David H. Hamer, 82, an internationally-recognized expert in cryptology, Bletchley Park Trust scholar, National Cryptologic Museum Foundation executive, AFIO member, died 3 April 2017.
Hamer was born in Billingham, [UK] an area later heavily bombed in WWII. He served in the British Royal Air Force in an intelligence role, before his career as a physical chemist brought him to the US in 1964. After retiring from his career in chemistry, he became a pilot with long assignments in Berlin, Paris, and London. His travels also took him to India, Nigeria, North Africa, the Middle East, and most of the countries of Western Europe. With a penchant for words and numbers, his love of crossword puzzles, indirectly, led him to cryptology in about 1986. He had been looking for a computer program that could help solve crossword puzzles and was referred to the American Cryptogram Association (ACA). Though he never found the software he sought, he learned about programs that cracked codes and ciphers, and that discovery led to his deep interest in cryptology. Before long he was writing and lecturing about its history demonstrating the use of Enigma machines to anyone who had an interest, from library groups to experts at conferences - how to correctly insert wheels and push buttons. In 2000, he was appointed visiting research scholar by the Bletchley Park Trust in England. He also was a member of Executive Committee of the National Cryptologic Museum Foundation [NCMF], in Fort Meade, MD, where he also served as the liaison officer with Bletchley Park and as Vice-Chairman of the Acquisitions Committee. He published several technical papers, and wrote book reviews and articles for Eye Spy, U.S. Naval Cryptologic Veterans Association (NCVA), Cryptologia (Editorial Board), Cryptogram, Chronological - Historical Association, South West Wales. His website continues on at: http://www.intelligenia.org/ His ashes will be scattered in England. He is survived by his wife, Joan, and other family.
In the coming months, there will be a luncheon to celebrate his life. He would love nothing more than for all to raise a glass in his name - preferably one filled with a good Irish whiskey.
Remark by a colleague: I was instantly impressed by his grasp and depth of knowledge about both of our nation's cryptologic histories. It's one thing to read about Great Britain's cryptologic giants from WW II. Our David was a contemporary and friend of many of the codebreakers from that era who helped win the war. There weren't many people left on either side of the ocean who could make that claim. He helped build, expand, and strengthen the important historic bridge between our respective museums and our nations. David was an absolute pleasure to work with and I am proud to have known him and call him both colleague and friend. ~ Mr. David D'Auria, NCMF [MORE at NCMF]

William "Bill" Talaber, Jr., 73, a former NSA TCOMMER and Manager, died Tuesday, 18 April 2017. Bill was a veteran of the U.S. Marine Corps and served from 1961 to 1966. He was employed with the Department of Defense (NSA) from 1966 to his retirement in 1998. During his 37 years of service he was a TCOMMer and Manager. After his retirement he stayed active working for several defense contractors from 1998 to 2016. He was a member of the Phoenix Society. In his free time he enjoyed traveling, tennis, golf (proud member of The Hazards golf group), and bowling. He had an avid interest in playing many card games such as Bridge, Pinochle, Poker, and Rummy which he played just a few days before his passing. His greatest passion and love was spending time with his family members and friends. He is survived by his wife of 53 years, Lora Talaber, and other family. [MORE at NCMF]


Section V - Events

AFIO EDUCATIONAL EVENTS IN COMING TWO MONTHS....

4 May 2017, 6 pm - Atlanta, GA - The AFIO Atlanta Chapter holds "First Thursday Social: Cocktails and Cigars at the Club at Chops."

Please join us as we convene for cocktails and cigars at the Club at Chops (70 West Paces Ferry Road, NW, in Buckhead next to the St. Regis Hotel).
Cost: Free for members and special guests, but we respectfully request that attendees purchase food, a drink, or a cigar from the hosting establishment, and tip generously (15% - 20%).

If you can attend, RSVP to AFIO Atlanta Membership Chair Dr. Patrick Barton at av8rp@comcast.net. (You can read about the Club at Chops here).

Saturday, 6 May 2017, 11 am - 3 pm - Orange Park, FL - The North Florida AFIO Chapter hosts former CIA Officer Dr. Edward Mickolus on "Coercive Intelligence, including EIT."

On May 6 our presenter will be one of our own. Compatriot Edward F. Mickolus, PhD who will be speaking on "Coercive Intelligence, including EIT (Enhanced Interrogation Techniques)."
Mickolus received his A.B. at Georgetown University, and Ph.D. at Yale. He served 33 years at the CIA in analysis, operations, management, recruiting and public affairs. His 31 books include a series of multi-volume chronologies and biographies on international terrorism; including many articles and reviews in journals and newspapers. He served as editor of CIA's internal publication, "What's New at CIA" from 1994-2005. For the last seven years, he has been a senior instructor for SAIC and its spinoff Leidos. Inc. He currently serves teaches at the University of North Florida.
AGENDA: 11-noon Social Hour; noon-12:05 Call to Order, Pledge, Invocation; 12:05-12:15 Intro of guests & new members; 12:15-1 Lunch; 1:00-1:15 break; 1:15-2 presentation by Dr. Edward F. Mickolus, CIA (Ret.); 2-3 Chapter business.
RSVP to Ken Meyer kemeyer123@att.net or call at 904-777-2050. Cost: $24 per person; pay Club at the luncheon. Family and guests, especially potential members, are all cordially invited.

11 May 2017, 6:30 pm - Atlanta, GA - The AFIO Atlanta Chapter hosts Dr. Harvey Klehr - on "From Russia with Love - Soviet Agent Turned Bond Consultant: The Career of Joseph Katz."

Join us as AFIO Atlanta member Dr. Harvey Klehr -- one of the country's foremost historians on Soviet espionage against the United States in the 20th century -- presents on his recent article in Commentary magazine (available here). Moderated by Dr. Eddie Mienie, Executive Director for Strategic Studies and Partnerships at the University of North Georgia, The Military College of Georgia.
Program begins at 6:30 pm at Emory University School of Law, Gambrell Hall, First Floor, Classroom 1B (1301 Clifton Road, Atlanta, Georgia).

Cost: Free for members and special guests. RSVP: AFIO Atlanta President Brian Hooper at bhooper@wcsr.com or 404.879.2440.

Friday, 12 May 2017 - Tysons Corner, VA - AFIO National Spring Luncheon features NYTimes Washington Correspondent David Sanger on "Terrorism, Secret Wars, Nuclear Proliferation, and the Use of American Power," and Author Eva Dillon on "Living Life Undercover in a CIA Family"

David E. Sanger, Chief Washington Correspondent for the New York Times, speaks on "Terrorism, Secret Wars, Nuclear Proliferation, and the Use of American Power." His address starts at 1 p.m.
The 11 a.m. speaker is Eva Dillon, author and magazine publisher, on Spies in the Family: An American Spymaster, His Russian Crown Jewel, and the Friendship That Helped End the Cold War and join AFIO as we welcome and thank Marina, the granddaughter of Gen Polyakov present with us at this special event. Dillon's book is an engaging true-life memoir, of her CIA father and the Soviet double agent he handled - the highest ranking, longest serving asset the US had during the Cold War. It is also a memoir about both families growing up unknowingly as the children of spies.
"A beautifully written, profoundly moving account of one of the most important U.S Intelligence sources ever run inside the Soviet Union. A cliff-hanger from beginning to end, Dillon's account is filled with espionage tradecraft and family drama - essential reading for intelligence professionals, memoir enthusiasts, and anyone fascinated by how spying really works." -- Peter Earnest, Executive Director, International Spy Museum
Event location the Crowne Plaza (soon to be renamed DoubleTree-Hilton), Tysons Corner, VA, at 1960 Chain Bridge Rd, McLean, VA 22102.
Registration is here. Do so now to assure seating.

13 May 2017, 11:30 am - Patrick AFB, FL - The AFIO Florida Satellite Chapter hosts Alexander Penalta, J.D. on "Civilian Drone Operations: The Threat Over the Horizon."

The guest speaker at this Florida Satellite Chapter meeting will be Alexander Penalta, Esquire (Juris Doctor), on "Civilian Drone Operations: The Threat Over the Horizon in the Age of Counterterrorism."
Attorney Penalta is an American Business Litigation and Aviation Lawyer, fluent in English and Spanish, licensed to practice in Florida and Washington, DC, with offices throughout North and South Florida. He currently serves as Chief Counsel at the The Penalta Law Firm (www.penaltalaw.com) and is a partner member of FBI Infragard.
Penalta's presentation will be followed by Q&A by Dr. Joseph Finley Ph.D., a former FBI Special Agent, on "ISIS Terror Tactics."
Location: The Tides, 1001 N. Hwy A1A, Bldg #967, Patrick AFB, FL 32925
Times: 11:30 AM - 12:15 PM Social Hour, greet old, new members and guests (limited cash bar – honor system); 12:15 PM: Sit-Down lunch To Attend: Prepaid reservations are required which must be received by 5 May 2017. To reserve, send check ($25 member; $28 guests) and meal choice (Marinated Beef Flank Steak (B); Twin Seared Chicken Breast w/Artichoke and Caper Sauce (C) Vegetarian/vegan available) by first contacting FSC Chapter President at afiofsc@afio.com.

Thursday, 18 May 2017, 11:30 AM - Colorado Springs, CO - The AFIO Rocky Mountain Chapter hosts Dr. William E. Berry, discussing "North Korea's Nuclear Weapons and Missile Program."

Dr. William E. Berry, Jr. is currently an independent consultant specializing in East Asian security issues after retiring from the Air Force as a colonel in 1997. During his military career, he served in Vietnam, the Philippines, Korea, and Malaysia where he was the air attaché from 1990-1993. He also taught at the Air Force Academy, the National War College, and the Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies and was the senior military professor and chair of the Academy's Department of Political Science toward the end of his career. Dr. Berry completed his most recent book entitled Global Security Watch-Korea, published by Praeger/Greenwood Press in March 2008.
The presentation will begin with a review of how the Kim dynasty in North Korea has endured from 1948 to the present, passing from father (Kim Il Sung 1948-1994) to son (Kim Jong Il (1994-2011) to grandson (Kim Jong Un 2011-present) despite widespread famine, malnutrition, and other inhumane sufferings of the North Korean people. It will then proceed to detail the North Korean nuclear weapons programs and the development of missile delivery systems.
The nuclear program started in the 1980s with a graphite reactor provided by the Soviets with a demand that NK join the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT). In the early 2000s the US accused NK of developing a covert highly enriched uranium program. NK withdrew from the NPT and probably produced about 50 warheads. Some 5 underground tests were conducted with increasing yields. Three tests occurred under the regime of the current Kim Jong Un.
A missile delivery system has also been developed, resulting in more than 20 intermediate range missile tests in 2016. There are plans for Intercontinental ballistic missiles. There are still technological issues with miniaturization and hardening, fitting warhead to missile and surviving reentry into the atmosphere, guidance systems etc. But the regime is extremely serious in further development.
The presentation will conclude with an examination of possible rationales for the decision of the Kims to expend scarce economic resources to develop nuclear weapons and delivery systems.
For details, please RSVP to Tom VanWormer at robsmom@pcisys.net.

HOLD THE DATE - 28 - 29 September 2017 - Tysons Corner, VA - AFIO's 2017 National Intelligence Symposium

Tentative Agenda: • Opening Remarks by AFIO President; • NGA Overview and Q&A; • Video Presentation; • NGA Leadership Remarks (D/NGA or DD) - Includes GEOINT Strategy and Functional Management; • Lunch (with museum tours, NGA store, and group photo). Presentations/Panels on: • KH 8 Declassification; • Pathfinder (unclassified research to solve intel problems); • Commercial GEOINT Activity; and • the Small Satellite Revolution.
Arrive Wednesday evening, 27 September to overnight at the hotel to be ready early Thursday, 28 September, for coach service to NGA for all day conference including visit to their new museum. Welcome by NGA Director Robert Cardillo. Friday activities TBA. Friday evening is our "Spies in Black Ties" banquet.
Hotel: DoubleTree-Hilton, Tysons Corner, VA [formerly the Crowne Plaza], at 1960 Chain Bridge Rd, McLean, VA 22102. Details, event registration and hotel room registration links to be sent to all current members in coming weeks. Early phone-only room registrations can be made at 1-877-865-1877 at $119/nite.


Other Upcoming Events

Thursday, 4 May 2017, noon - 2 pm - CWO(4) James Stejskal USA Rtd., discusses Special Forces Berlin: Clandestine Cold War Operations of the US Army's Elite, 1956–1990 at the Australian Embassy

The Washington Sub-Branch of the Returned & Services League of Australia luncheon at the Australian Embassy features CWO (4) James Stejskal USA Rtd., discussing his new book: Special Forces Berlin: Clandestine Cold War Operations of the US Army's Elite, 1956–1990.
James Stejskal hails from the Great Plains of Nebraska. After a short stint at the University of Nebraska he enlisted in the US Army. First training as an airborne infantryman and serving with the 82nd Airborne, he then qualified for Special Forces and successfully completed the arduous "Q" Course to win his "Green Beret." He served with US Army Special Forces in many "interesting places" worldwide, including Germany, the Balkans, the Middle East, and Africa before retiring as a Chief Warrant Officer 4 (CWO4) after 23 years. But the adventure was only just starting... He then worked as a security consultant for a US NGO in central Africa during the Rwandan insurgency and second Congo War. In the last century, he was recruited by CIS and served as a senior case officer in Africa, Europe, and the Far East before retiring again. He is now a military historian
Where –Amenities Room, Embassy of Australia, 1601 Massachusetts Ave NW, Washington, DC 20036
Charge - $15, including buffet lunch and sodas. Alcoholic beverages- $2 each. Attire: Business casual.
RSVP by noon on Wednesday, 26 April 2017 to David Ward at 202-352-8550 or via e-mail to dmward1973@gmail.com NOTE: Valid photo ID required. Parking: While there is no parking at the Embassy, paid, off street parking is available behind and under the Airline Pilots Association- 17th and Mass, and, at 15th and Mass (1240 15th St). On street two hour metered parking also available.

Thursday, 4 May 2017, 7 pm - Washington, DC - 2017 Night of Heroes Gala - PenFed Foundation

You are cordially invited to join the PenFed Foundation, our partners and friends, Thursday, 4 May 2017, as we honor those who lead the way in supporting our military and veterans. All proceeds benefit the PenFed Foundation, helping members of the military secure the financial future they deserve.
Location: Trump® International Hotel, 1100 Pennsylvania Ave, Washington, DC
VIP Sponsor Reception - 5:30 pm; General Reception - 6 pm; Dinner - 7 pm Black Tie.
For more information and to RSVP online, do so here.

Thursday, 4 May 2017, 6:30pm - Washington, DC - Star Wars or Spy Wars: Who Needs the Force When You Have Good Intel? - at the International Spy Museum

Location: Long ago in a galaxy far, far away; Operative: Leia Organa; Works for: the Rebel Alliance; Mission: Scientific and technological espionage; Cover: Diplomatic; Target: Death Star Plans. From the moment Leia receives the stolen plans and conceals them within R2-D2 to the surprise intel that Finn provides from his stint in sanitation the importance of inside and secret information in Star Wars is essential. Infiltration, deception, resistance movements, sabotage, disguise are all featured. Is Star Wars the ultimate spy movie series? Spy Museum historian, Dr. Vince Houghton thinks so. Join him for a deep dive into the espionage themes that run through the series and are a central part of Rogue One. He'll even share rumors about the upcoming Episode VIII and you may get to mingle with a few of your favorite characters. Tickets for the general public: $15, tickets for Spy Museum Inner Circle Members: $12. Visit www.spymuseum.org. Monday, May 8 - Sunday, May 14, all day - Washington, DC - Free Admission for Teachers! Celebrating Teacher Appreciation Week - at the International Spy Museum It's no secret, we love teachers! In honor of Teacher Appreciation Week, show your school ID and enjoy free admission to the Museum + 20% off at the Spy Store! Visit www.spymuseum.org.

Sunday, 07 May 2017 - 2 - 5:30p - Warrenton, VA - Stasi Prisoner, Soviet Prisoner: Former Prisoners Tell You What It Was Like - a presentation by The Cold War Museum

"Inside Their Walls and in Their Power: Former Intelligence Professionals Who Were Stasi and Soviet Prisoners tell you What It Looked and Felt Like" is the program on this Sunday event being held by the Cold War Museum in cooperation with Old Bust Head Brewing Company, invites you to attend a presentation by Werner Juretzko; Francis Gary Powers, Jr.; and Chris Sturdevant This is the fourth in a series of presentations sponsored by the Museum in cooperation with Vint Hill entitiesThe Juretzko-Powers, Jr.-Sturdevant presentation will occur at the Brewery, followed by a visit to the Cold War Museum (across from the Brewery). Cost: $35 (advance sales online), which covers the presentation with Q&A, a $7 coupon for the Brewery's craft beers or other beverages, a $20 contribution to the Cold War Museum, and special access to the Museum (directly across from the Brewery) for event participants following the presentation. $45 at the door (if there are any seats available.)
Location: Old Bust Head Brewing Company, 7134 Farm Station Road, Vint Hill, VA 20187, https://www.oldbusthead.com/, and the Cold War Museum, 7142 Lineweaver Road, Vint Hill, VA 20187, www.coldwar.org

Monday, 8 May thru Sunday, 14 May 2017, all day - Washington, DC - Free Admission for Teachers! at the International Spy Museum

The Spy Museum celebrates Teacher Appreciation Week. It's no secret, we love teachers! In honor of Teacher Appreciation Week, show your school ID and enjoy free admission to the Museum + 20% off at the Spy Store! Visit www.spymuseum.org.

Wednesday, 10 May 2017, noon - Washington, DC - Global Terrorism, Espionage and Cybersecurity Monthly Update - at the International Spy Museum

Learn the latest intelligence news from David Major, retired supervisory special agent of the FBI and former director of Counterintelligence and Security Programs at the NSC staff at the White House, for his briefing on the hottest intelligence and security issues, breaches, and penetrations. Presented in partnership with The Centre for Counterintelligence and Security Studies (CI Centre), these updates will cover worldwide events such as breaking espionage cases and arrest reports, cyber espionage incidents, and terrorist activity. Major uses his expertise to analyze trends and highlight emerging issues of interest to both intelligence and national security professionals and the public. Cases are drawn from the CI Centre's SPYPEDIA®, the most comprehensive source of espionage information in the world, containing events and information that may not be reported by mainstream media outlets. Event is free. Visit www.spymuseum.org.

16 May 2017, 11:30 am - 2 pm - McLean, VA - Defense Intelligence Forum hears from former FBI Special Agent Gary Harter on "The Insider Threat and Cyber Security."

The Defense Intelligence Forum (DIA Alumni Association) hears from former FBI Special Agent Gary Harter on "The Insider Threat and Cyber Security." Mr. Harter served 30 years with FBI. Most of this time was spenton various cases of insider threats. Attribution for this presentation will be provided at the beginning of the presentation to ensure a complete understanding of how the presented information should be handled

Event location: Pulcinella Restaurant, 6852 Old Dominion Dr, McLean, VA.
Registration starts at 1130 AM, lunch at noon.
Make reservations by 16 May 2017 by email to diforum@diaalumni.org. Include names, telephone numbers, and email addresses for self and guests. Choose Chicken Parmesan, Trout Lemone , Grilled Sausage with Sweet Peppers, Lasagna, Manicotti with Spinach and Ricotta, Cannelloni alla Bolognese, or Fettuccini with Portobello. Provide your luncheon selection with your reservation to reduce the wait time for your food. Pay online with a credit card or at the door with a check for $30 per person, payable to DIAA, Inc. Checks are preferred, but will accept cash; however, credit card payments are discouraged.

Wednesday, 17 May 2017, 7-10pm - Washington, DC - Dinner with Spies: An Evening with N. John MacGaffin III and William Ross Newland III - at the International Spy Museum

What's it like to be a CIA Chief of Station? To manage all the CIA's operations in a country that may not be too happy with your work if you are discovered? Does it take nerves of steel? A brilliant mind? Or a good sense of humor? Possibly all of the above, if you judge by tonight's guests of honor: John MacGaffin and Ross Newland. These intelligence experts have nearly 60 years of CIA service between them. Their extraordinary intelligence careers have taken them to some of the most interesting and tension filled places in the world. Of their many overseas assignments, MacGaffin had four postings as chief of station, primarily in the Middle East; and Newland had three including Bucharest and Havana. Although some of their toughest assignments were at home forging relationships between the CIA and FBI, and the CIA and the US military. At this spirited dinner, you'll discover the reality behind a job that is frequently featured in films and television - MacGaffin serves as an advisor to the Homeland series! You will be one of only twenty guests at The Riggsby for this delicious four-course dinner of upscale American cuisine with European influences. Tickets for the general public: $225, tickets for Spy Museum Inner Circle Members: $200. Visit www.spymuseum.org.

Thursday, 25 May 2017 10 am - 11:30 am - Fort Meade, MD - National Cryptologic Museum's Schorreck Lecture: "Codebreaking and the Battle of Midway" with Author/Historian Elliot Carlson

2017 Henry F. Schorreck Lecture Speaker Series features Elliot Carlson, author of the celebrated biography of CMDR Joseph Rochefort (cryptologic hero of the Battle of Midway) - Joe Rochefort's War: The Odyssey of the Codebreaker Who Outwitted Yamamoto at Midway. Carlson's talk will be "Codebreaking and the Battle of Midway: When Cryptanalysis Came of Age." More about Carlson's book is here.

On 3-7 June 1942, the US defeated Japan in the Battle of Midway, one of the most decisive battles in world history. The battle regained the initiative in the Pacific for the US after its setback at Pearl Harbor on 7 December 1941 while placing Japan on the strategic defensive from which it never fully recovered. On the 75th Anniversary of this US naval victory, Carlson discusses the pivotal role that intelligence played in it. In particular, the breaking of JN-25, the Japanese Imperial Fleet's operational code, by codebreakers at Station Hypo in Hawaii led by CMDR Joseph Rochefort USN.
Carlson holds degrees from Stanford University (MA) and the University of Oregon (BS); he lives with his wife in Silver Spring, MD.

RSVP: Advanced registration required since this popular NCM Schorreck Lecture Series always has a full house. So, to not lose a spot, email history@nsa.gov and/or gjnedve@nsa.gov and provide the number of seats you will need. They will confirm your reservations and answer any questions.
Event location: National Cryptologic Museum: 9900 Colony Seven Rd, Fort Meade, MD. Directions here.

4 - 7 June 2017 - San Antonio, TX - USGIF GEOINT 2017 Symposium theme is: "Advancing Capabilities to Meet Emerging Threats"

The always impressive US Geospatial-Intelligence Foundation (USGIF) is offering more than 25 training and professional development sessions at their GEOINT 2017 Symposium on "Advancing Capabilities to Meet Emerging Threats" being held in beautiful San Antonio, TX. Monday, June 5 through Wednesday, June 7 are a variety of training sessions running two hours each. Attendees receive 0.2 Continuing Education Units per qualified session. Expand your knowledge on a familiar topic or learn a new one in one of the hottest, most promising and useful fields in the Intelligence Community. Sessions include: Hacking for Defense: Solving National Security Problems; 3D Terrain Modeling; Analytics for Small Sat Systems; Recent Advances in Deep Learning Cognitive Social Media Analytics Framework; Open Geospatial Machine Learning; Cyber Attack and Defense Wargame with IT, Industrial, and GEOINT Context; And much more.
Location: Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center, San Antonio, TX.
RSVP ASAP: Agenda and other information here.

20 June 2017, 10 am to 1 pm - Annapolis Junction, MD - NCMF 2017 Summer Cryptologic Program features David Priess on The President's Daily Brief. Special NSA/NCMF WWI Panel Discussions on "Decoding The Great War" and Presentations of the new WWI Exhibit takes place.

Program features Mr. David Priess, former CIA Intelligence Officer and author of the bestseller The President's Book of Secrets. This National Cryptologic Museum Foundation event can be signed up for here
Where: CACI, Inc. located at 2720 Technology Drive, Annapolis Junction, MD 20701, Tel 301-575-3200. Directions and Map here. Click "directions" to get driving guidance.
RSVP NOW: register online here or mail registration fee of $20 (members) or $50 (guests, includes one-year membership) to NCMF, PO Box 1682, Fort George G. Meade, MD 20755-9998. Please register prior to 23 March to ensure space available.

Also on 20 June, following the Priess presentation above, NSA's Center for Cryptologic History joins the Museum to host a WWI Panel Discussion: Decoding The Great War and Presentation of the new World War One Exhibit at the National Cryptologic Museum.

Presentations and speakers are:
Presentation 1: 1305 - World War I as an Intelligence Revolution, Michael Warner, Command Historian, US Cyber Command.
Presentation 2: 1325 - An Ear to the Air and an Ear to the Ground: Radio Intelligence in the American Expeditionary Forces, 1917-1918, Betsy Rohaly Smoot, Historian, Center for Cryptologic History, NSA.
Presentation 3: 1345 - Native American Code Talkers: the Secret Weapon of World War I, Dr. Steve Huffman, Retired Research Analyst, NSA. Q&A: 1345 - 1400 1405 - 1430: Presentation of World War 1 Display - Betsy Rohaly Smoot. For details on each of the presentations and speakers, or to register for one or both of these NSA/NCMF Events, use this link.

18 October 2017, 9 am - 3 pm - Laurel, MD - NCMF General Meeting & Symposium: "How Cyber has Changed the World Around Us."

SAVE THE DATE. Information coming in July. Details will be at www.cryptologicfoundation.org.
Event location: The Kossiakoff Center, Johns Hopkins University/Applied Physics Laboratory.

19 - 20 October 2017 - Laurel, MD - 16th NSA/CSS Center for Cryptologic History Symposium: "Milestones, Memories, and Momentum."

SAVE THE DATE. Information forthcoming. This symposium will be followed on 21 October 2017 with tours and workshops at the National Cryptologic Museum.
Location: Kossiakoff Conference Center, Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, Maryland.
For more about the program, visit www.nsa.gov

PAPERS for this event: The theme for the 2017 Symposium will be "Milestones, Memories, and Momentum." There are many milestones to mark in 2017: the 160th anniversary of the first attempt to span the Atlantic with a telegraph cable, 100 years since both the entry of the United States into World War I and the Russian October Revolution, and 75 years after the World War II battles of Coral Sea and Midway. The Symposium will take place just a few months before the 50th anniversary of the Tet Offensive in Vietnam, and during the 25th year after the fall of the Soviet Union and the end of the Cold War. Papers looking at these milestone events in cryptology and considering how we remember their significance are particularly encouraged, as are those examining how cryptologic advances from these times provided momentum to create the systems of today and the future. Your proposal package should include an abstract of no more than ONE page, a complete CV, a short biographical sketch (not to exceed 150 words) to be used in the program, the amount of time you require for your paper, and full contact details. Panel proposals should include the above for each presenter and a short explanation of the panel's theme. Please submit your proposal by noon on Monday, February 6, 2017, to Program Chair Betsy Rohaly Smoot at history@nsa.gov or to her care at The Center for Cryptologic History, Suite 6886, 9800 Savage Road, Fort George G. Meade, MD 20755. Please note that correspondence that does not include the suite number may not be delivered in a timely manner. Proposals received after noon on February 6 will be considered on a space-available basis. The program committee will notify you about the final status of your proposal by June 9, 2017, but may engage you in discussions before that date. See details here.


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