AFIO Weekly Intelligence Notes #19-17 dated 9 May 2017

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CONTENTS

Section I - INTELLIGENCE HIGHLIGHTS

Section II - CONTEXT & PRECEDENCE

Section III - COMMENTARY

Section IV - Events

Upcoming AFIO Events

Other Upcoming Events

For Additional AFIO and other Events two+ months or more... Calendar of Events 

WIN CREDITS FOR THIS ISSUE: The WIN editors thank the following special contributors:  pjk, mh, km, gh, mk, rd, fm, kc, jm, mr, jg, th and fwr. They have contributed one or more stories used in this issue.

The WIN editors attempt to include a wide range of articles and commentary in the Weekly Notes to inform and educate our readers. However, the views expressed in the articles are purely those of the authors, and in no way reflect support or endorsement from the WIN editors or the AFIO officers and staff. We welcome comments from the WIN readers on any and all articles and commentary.
CAVEATS: IMPORTANT: AFIO does not "vet" or endorse research inquiries, career announcements, or job offers. Reasonable-sounding inquiries and career offerings are published as a service to our members, and for researchers, educators, and subscribers. You are urged to exercise your usual caution and good judgment when responding, and should verify the source independently before supplying any resume, career data, or personal information.]
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Recently released - AFIO's 2017 edition of...

Intelligence as a Career BookletIntelligence as a Career - with updated listings of colleges teaching intelligence courses, and Q&As on needed foreign languages, as well as the courses, grades, extracurricular activities, and behavioral characteristics and life experiences sought by modern US intelligence agencies.

AFIO's popular 56-page booklet reaches high school and college students considering careers in the US Intelligence Community. This is the fourth edition.
The publication is also popular with University Career Guidance Centers, professors and academic departments specializing in national security, and parents assisting children or grandchildren in choosing meaningful, public service careers.
This booklet is provided at no cost as a public service - online and in print - from the generosity of AFIO board, donors, and members. 20,000 printed copies of each edition are distributed. Many more are accessed online.
We thank all members and donors for their support which has made this possible.

2017 edition of Careers Booklet in PDF Format available here.

Also now online as a public service from the generosity of our members and donors is the entire 788-page AFIO's Guide to the Study of Intelligence, Peter Oleson, Editor, with a foreword by Dr. Robert M. Gates.
It can be accessed here.
If you wish, instead, to own a printed, bound copy, those are available here (AFIO) and here (Amazon).


     

AFIO warmly thanks our WINs editors, including Teri Rustmann, for 10 years of news-gathering and organizing of these popular AFIO Weekly Notes provided to all current members as part of the educational service of the association. We look forward to their next decade of outstanding service.


Only a few seats remain...make one of them yours

AFIO's Spring Luncheon

this Friday, 12 May 2017
11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Last change to register if space available

Author Eva Dillon on
"Living Life Undercover in a CIA Family"
and join AFIO as we welcome and thank Marina, the granddaughter of Gen Polyakov present with us at this special event.

- and -

New York Times Washington Correspondent
David Sanger on
"Terrorism, Secret Wars, Nuclear Proliferation, and the Use of American Power"

The 11 a.m. speaker is Eva Dillon, author and magazine publisher, on Spies in the Family: An American Spymaster, His Russian Crown Jewel, and the Friendship That Helped End the Cold War. It is an engaging true-life memoir, of her CIA father, Paul Dillon, and the GRU officer who became a CIA agent whom her father handled - the highest ranking, longest serving asset the US had during the Cold War. It is also a memoir about both families growing up unknowingly as the children of spies.

David E. Sanger, Chief Washington Correspondent for the New York Times, speaks on "Terrorism, Secret Wars, Nuclear Proliferation, and the Use of American Power." His address starts at 1 p.m.

"A beautifully written, profoundly moving account of one of the most important US Intelligence sources ever run inside the Soviet Union. A cliff-hanger from beginning to end, Dillon's account is filled with espionage tradecraft and family drama - essential reading for intelligence professionals, memoir enthusiasts, and anyone fascinated by how spying really works." -- Peter Earnest, Executive Director, International Spy Museum

Event location is the Crowne Plaza (soon to be renamed DoubleTree-Hilton), Tysons Corner, VA, at 1960 Chain Bridge Rd, McLean, VA 22102.

Registration is here
. Do so quickly to assure seating.


"Codebreaking and the Battle of Midway" with Author/Historian Elliot Carlson
National Cryptologic Museum's Schorreck Lecture
Thursday, 25 May 2017 10 am - 11:30 am

Fort Meade, MD

2017 Henry F. Schorreck Lecture Speaker Series features Elliot Carlson, author of the celebrated biography of CMDR Joseph Rochefort (cryptologic hero of the Battle of Midway) - Joe Rochefort's War: The Odyssey of the Codebreaker Who Outwitted Yamamoto at Midway. Carlson's talk will be "Codebreaking and the Battle of Midway: When Cryptanalysis Came of Age." More about Carlson's book here.

On 3-7 June 1942, the US defeated Japan in the Battle of Midway, one of the most decisive battles in world history. The battle regained the initiative in the Pacific for the US after its setback at Pearl Harbor on 7 December 1941 while placing Japan on the strategic defensive from which it never fully recovered. On the 75th Anniversary of this US naval victory, Carlson discusses the pivotal role that intelligence played in it. In particular, the breaking of JN-25, the Japanese Imperial Fleet's operational code, by codebreakers at Station Hypo in Hawaii led by CMDR Joseph Rochefort USN.
Carlson holds degrees from Stanford University (MA) and the University of Oregon (BS).
He lives with his wife in Silver Spring, MD.

RSVP: Advanced registration required since this popular NCM Schorreck Lecture Series always has a full house. To not lose a spot, email history@nsa.gov and/or gjnedve@nsa.gov and provide the number of seats you will need. They will confirm your reservations and answer any questions.
Event location: National Cryptologic Museum: 9900 Colony Seven Rd, Fort Meade, MD. Directions here.
Plenty of convenient, free parking.


Book of the Week

Biosecurity Dilemmas: Dreaded Diseases, Ethical Responses, and the Health of Nations
by Christian Enemark
(Georgetown Univ Press, Jan 2017)

Order here.

"...the key biosecurity challenges confronting the world today. Biosecurity Dilemmas explores the vexing policy tensions and ethical trade-offs involved in protecting populations against biological danger. Enemark elegantly tames the complexity by showing that four major dilemmas lie at the heart of these issues. An impressive scholarly achievement." -- Stefan Elbe, Director, Centre for Global Health Policy, University of Sussex

Biosecurity encompasses both the natural occurrence of deadly disease outbreaks and the use of biological weapons. Biosecurity Dilemmas examines conflicting values and interests in the practice of "biosecurity," the safeguarding of populations against infectious diseases through security policies. Enemark focuses on six dreaded diseases that governments and international organizations give high priority for research, regulation, surveillance, and rapid response: pandemic influenza, drug-resistant tuberculosis, smallpox, Ebola, plague, and anthrax. The book is organized around four ethical dilemmas that arise when fear causes these diseases to be framed in terms of national or international security: protect or proliferate, secure or stifle, remedy or overkill, and attention or neglect. For instance, will prioritizing research into defending against a rare event such as a bioterrorist attack divert funds away from research into commonly occurring diseases? Or will securitizing a particular disease actually stifle research progress owing to security classification measures? Enemark provides a comprehensive analysis of the ethics of securitizing disease and explores ideas and policy recommendations about biological arms control, global health security, and public health ethics.

The book may be ordered here.


HOLD THE DATE: AFIO's 2017 National Intelligence Symposium

"Succeeding in the Open – The Future of GEOINT "

will be at the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency
and elsewhere (TBA),
Thursday & Friday, 28 to 29 September 2017.
Hotel: DoubleTree-Hilton, Tysons Corner, VA

Tentative Agenda: • Opening Remarks by AFIO President; • NGA Overview and Q&A; • Video Presentation; • NGA Leadership Remarks (D/NGA or DD) - Includes GEOINT Strategy and Functional Management; • Lunch (with museum tours, NGA store, and group photo). Presentations/Panels on: • KH 8 Declassification; • Pathfinder (unclassified research to solve intel problems); • Commercial GEOINT Activity; and • the Small Satellite Revolution.

Arrive Wednesday evening, 27 September to overnight at the hotel to be ready early Thursday, 28 September, for coach service to NGA for all day conference including visit to their new museum. Welcome by NGA Director Robert Cardillo. Friday activities TBA. Friday evening is our "Spies in Black Ties" banquet.
Hotel: DoubleTree-Hilton, Tysons Corner, VA [formerly the Crowne Plaza], at 1960 Chain Bridge Rd, McLean, VA 22102. Details, event registration and hotel room registration links to be sent to all current members in coming weeks. Early phone-only room registrations can be made at 1-877-865-1877 at $119/nite.


Section I - INTELLIGENCE HIGHLIGHTS

Intel Act Highlights Cyber, STEM and Russia.  More than half way through the fiscal year, Congress has passed the 2017 Intelligence Authorization Act, which emphasizes recruiting professionals in science, technology, engineering and math;  improving cybersecurity; and countering Russian influence operations.

The act calls on the Office of the Director of National Intelligence to draft a five-year investment strategy for outreach and recruiting of STEM professionals with an emphasis on cybersecurity and computer skills. Each intelligence agency is directed to develop similar investment plans.

The act also states that agencies may establish higher rates of pay for STEM personnel to assist in recruiting and retention. The DNI is further directed to "improve management of the workforce of the intelligence community," by enabling agencies "to build and maintain an appropriate mix between employees of the United States Government and core contractors."

The STEM provisions in the act highlight the fact that the federal government is taking seriously the need to have parity with the private sector in order to compete for talent, said Jonathan Clifford, director of national security for the Information Technology Alliance for the Public Sector (ITAPS).  [Read More:  Carberry/fcw/5May2017]

Edward Lin Admits to Disclosing Classified Information, Not to Espionage.  A Navy officer accused of espionage has pleaded guilty to less serious charges as part of a negotiated plea deal.

Lt. Cmdr. Edward Lin, 40, admitted to the charges during a court-martial before a military judge on Thursday.

Last year the military had accused Lin of two instances of espionage, three instances of attempted espionage and several instances of mishandling classified information and failing to report contact with foreign agents.

The new deal allows Lin to plead not guilty to military espionage charges but guilty to charges that include failing to report foreign contacts, mishandling classified information and disclosing secret information to a female friend working for a Taiwanese political party in Washington, DC and an undercover FBI agent posing as an employee of Taiwan’s ministry of foreign affairs.  [Read More:  LaGrone/usni/4May2017]

DHS Uncovered More Than 60 Cross-Border Tunnels Along Mexican Border Used for Smuggling.  The Department of Homeland Security uncovered more than 60 cross-border tunnels along the southwest border that were used to smuggle people and illicit drugs into the United States over a five-year period, according to a new government report.

The agency also detected more than 530 "ultralight aircraft" intrusions into the United States and roughly 300 drug smuggling incidents involving small fishing boats and recreational vessels along American borders from 2011 to 2016, the Government Accountability Office reported.

All 67 tunnels discovered by border patrol agents were located along the US-Mexican border. Likewise, all but one of the light aircraft incursions was detected on the southwest border in Arizona, California, New Mexico, and Texas.

A majority - nearly 76 percent - of the 309 maritime drug smuggling incidents involving fishing boats occurred on the West Coast, while the remaining 24 percent took place on the southeast coast, northeast coast, and southwest border.  [Read More:  Johnson/freebeacon/3May2017]

SpaceX Successfully Launches Top-Secret Spy Satellite.  SpaceX on Monday successfully launched a top-secret spy satellite into orbit and landed its first-stage booster.

But don't expect any details about the national security payload - a contract with the Department of Defense's National Reconnaissance Office (NRO).

"Thanks to the SpaceX team for the great ride, and for the terrific teamwork and commitment they demonstrated throughout," Betty Sapp, director of the National Reconnaissance Office, said in a statement. "They were an integral part of our government/industry team for this mission, and proved themselves to be a great partner."

Following a literal last-minute cancellation on Sunday - an issue with a rocket sensor forced officials to call off the mission 52 seconds before liftoff - Elon Musk's private aerospace firm yesterday launched NROL-76 at 7:15 a.m. ET from the Kennedy Space Center.  [Read More:  Mlot/geek/2May2017]

Germany Questions Swiss Ambassador in Spying Case.  Germany's Foreign Ministry says the Swiss ambassador has been called in for talks following the arrest last week of a Swiss national on spying charges.

The Foreign Ministry said the ambassador was asked Tuesday for more details about the spying suspect, a 54-year-old identified only as Daniel M., "in the interests of the German-Swiss friendship."

After his arrest in Frankfurt on Friday, prosecutors said M. was suspected of espionage activity in Germany since 2012.

The Welt newspaper reported Sunday M. was sent to Germany by Switzerland's intelligence agency to identify German tax investigators involved in the purchase of confidential Swiss bank client data.  [Read More:  AP/miamiherald/2May2017]

Sandy Phan-Gillis Deported Back to US After Two Years of Detention in China.  Sandy Phan-Gillis, an American citizen, was deported back to the United States, as confirmed by the US State Department on Sunday, April 30. She has been under Chinese custody for over two years and was convicted of espionage.

"We are aware that Chinese authorities deported Ms. Phan-Gillis back to the United States," an official from the State Department said, according to Channel News Asia. "The United States welcomes her home."

Phan-Gillis was part of a trade delegation from Houston, Texas. They were on their way from mainland China, at the Macau border, when she was seized by Chinese authorities upon accusations of espionage.

For six months, Phan-Gillis, who was born in Vietnam and has Chinese heritage, was held by Chinese authorities at an undisclosed location. She was later moved to a detention center in Guangxi Province under solitary confinement.  [Read More:  Siervo/yibada/3May2017]

Venezuela's Ex-Spy Chief Promotes Possible Presidential Bid.  A former spy chief under the late leader Hugo Chavez is emerging as a political player in turbulent Venezuela, mistrusted by the opposition and despised by the government as he travels the country in a possible bid for the presidency.

Miguel Rodriguez Torres is a longshot who hopes to offer a third way for Venezuelans weary of the country's violence and economic woes.

Reviled among President Nicolas Maduro's opponents for leading a crackdown on anti-government protesters in 2014, Rodriguez Torres has also alienated government loyalists with his sharp criticism of the socialist administration.

But he nevertheless is finding an audience among Venezuelans who have abandoned support for a government that has failed to resolve the economic crisis but still distrust the opposition.  [Read More:  AP/foxnews/8May2017]

Putin Visits His Former KGB Boss on His 90th Birthday.  Russian President Vladimir Putin and his former KGB colleagues visited an ex-East Germany station chief to wish their former boss well on his 90th birthday.

Putin was joined by Sergey Chemezov and Nikolay Tokarev, who served with him as intelligence officers in East Germany. They visited Lazar Matveev, who turned 90 today, at his home in Zhulebino, a neighborhood in eastern Moscow, on Monday.

Theirs appeared to be a surprise visit, the birthday boy staring in amazement as he open the door to his former charge, now the president of Russia.

Putin brought his ex-boss what he called "an officer's gift" - a wrist watch with the presidential coat of arms, as well as a rare copy of Pravda newspaper printed in 1927 - the year the retired intelligence officer was born.  [Read More:  rt/8May2017]

US Launches Spy Unit to Gather Human Intelligence From North Korea.  US Forces' Korea division will be handed with task of gathering human intelligence from North Korea regime.

The US intends to accomplish operative measures involving collecting human intelligence and performing counter-espionage tasks to support the main South Korean and US forces.

It will gain intelligence by using a secret agent in the despot nation or by infiltrating operatives on the heavily guarded Korean border.

"Gathering intelligence through wiretapping and satellite imagery has its limitations, so the missing pieces of the puzzle must be solved through human intelligence," a military official said.  [Read More:  defenseworld/8May2017]



Section II - CONTEXT & PRECEDENCE

Navy Veteran Discovers Rare NASA, Spy Drone Photos in Trash.  Yvette Quinn was convinced the list of aerospace engineers she discovered in a neighbor's trash a few weeks ago was solid gold for international con men.

The Navy veteran said she was concerned because the list of scientists had secret and top secret clearance along with their Social Security numbers in plain view.

"Nothing less, nothing less," Quinn told WKMG News 6, "and that was scary."

Scary, she said, because all of it, including test results of early aerospace models and drones, was just sitting there, ripe for the taking.  [Read More:  Holfeld/clickorlando/2May2017]

Hitler's Awkward Audience With MI5 Housewife on the Eve of War.  In the annals of British espionage the story of how MI5 managed to get a spy into close contact with Adolf Hitler only a month before the start of the Second World War should have been one of its greatest coups.

The agent codenamed M/T, who has been unmasked for the first time in a new book, did not look like much of a spy.

Kathleen Tesch was a small Home Counties housewife with a fondness for dogs whose chief claim to fame until that point was the costumes she wore at her village fête.  [Read More:  Low/thetimes/3May2017]

Astronaut Discusses Science and Spacewalks at DIA.  NASA astronaut Dr. Serena Auñón-Chancellor spoke at the Defense Intelligence Agency headquarters in Washington, DC April 17, discussing her experiences as an astronaut and the US space program.

In the latest installment of DIA's the Masterminds series, Dr. Auñón-Chancellor spoke to DIA officers about the astronaut selection and training program, her upcoming mission to the International Space Station (ISS), and working with foreign counterparts.

"Your [DIA's] work touches many people across the globe...if not everyone; we like to think at NASA we also touch everyone," said Auñón-Chancellor.

Auñón-Chancellor, an engineer and flight surgeon, handles medical issues for both the Commercial Crew and International Space Station Operations branch. She also has served as the lead capsule communicator - serving as the communication link between the IIS and NASA Mission Control Center on Earth. Her training and assignments have led her to Russia, Ukraine, Texas and the South Pole.  [Read More:  DIA Public Affairs/dia/3May2017]

Interested in an Internship Next Summer Within the Intelligence Community?  If you have an interest in computer science, spatial technologies and/or cybersecurity, you might be interested in a summer internship with the National Geospatial Intelligence Agency (NGA) located outside of Washington, DC. If you are entering your second year or higher, now is the time to apply for NEXT summer. Because we have been designated nationally by NGA and USGS as a Center of Academic Excellence in Geospatial Technologies, UMaine students (particularly in the School of Computing and Information Science) have an early opportunity to pursue one of the internships. The security clearance process is long, expensive and at the Government's expense but once you have the clearance this will be a substantial asset for many job-related opportunities in the future. If this sounds like something you might be interested in pursuing, read the material below.  [Read More:  umaine/6May2017]

CSIS Suspected Soviet Spies of Pinching King Diary Full of Atomic Secrets.  Canada's spy agency surmised that Soviet agents stole a key volume of William Lyon Mackenzie King's fabled diary - a theory dissected in a new book about the intrigue surrounding Canada's longest-serving prime minister.

The missing diary volume covered much of the final two months of 1945, a period that included King's visit to Washington to confer with his US and British counterparts about atomic secrets.

Historian Christopher Dummitt sifted through archival records to shed fresh light on the mystery in his newly published book Unbuttoned: A History of Mackenzie King's Secret Life.

Dummitt, an associate history professor at Trent University in Peterborough, Ont., traces the evolution of the official narrative of King's public persona and how the man widely came to be seen as "Weird Willie" due to dalliances with the occult.  [Read More:  Bronskill/rdnewsnow/7May2017]



Section III - COMMENTARY

China's Spy Hunting Tactics.  China's counterintelligence capabilities continue to evolve. The newest arrow in their quiver to detect those who are breaking trust with Mother China is the "bounty" for identification of "suspicious foreigners."  The bounty can go as high as 500,000 Yuan to the private citizen who hits the jackpot and identifies a bona fide spy.

On the second anniversary of China's National Security Day, China's counterintelligence apparatus launched their bounty program. An effort to crowd-source all 1.39 billion citizens, of which 21.5 million reside in Beijing the epicenter of foreign espionage in China, into the cadre of counterespionage sleuths.

According to Sina, a Chinese media outlet, the People's Republic of China observed the day nationwide with "eye-catching street banners, community publicity events, vivid videos and graphs shared online." Sina continued, how students from primary and middle schools were given counterespionage readers. The readers contained cartoons and games designed to spread the knowledge of national security.

The Beijing State Security Bureau (BSSB and a part of the national Ministry of State Security) published, via the Beijing City Government website, their plea to the citizens to assist in the identification of "illegal activities which endanger national security."  [Read More:  Burgess/csoonline/3May2017]

Intelligence Community's Annual Report is Reminder of American Transparency.  The Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI) on Tuesday released its Annual Transparency Report, shedding light on how often the government collects information by using its intelligence agencies. The next day, FBI director James Comey revealed that the bureau was unable to hack almost half of the encrypted devices it had search warrants for. Comey's statement and the findings of the report stand in contrast to the public belief - often reinforced by leaks - that the US government closely monitors its citizens through a plethora of media and devices.

The American people have always had an affinity for conspiracy theories, especially those involving the government. Sometimes the public is even right, such as during the 1970s, when a series of investigative committees (including the Rockefeller Commission) uncovered the depth and extent to which the intelligence community (IC) had unlawfully observed US citizens. In recent years, especially in light of the digital boom and repeated leaks of sensitive information, such conspiracy theories have been thriving.

There is good reason to be pleased with ODNI's report despite public concerns, as it arises from two important documents: the statutory requirements of the USA FREEDOM Act of 2015, and the IC's internal document entitled Principles of Intelligence Transparency. The IC's commitment to transparency is far from trivial; such organizations routinely use their need to protect sensitive assets to justify concealing information that should often be in the public domain.  [Read More:  Hershkovitz/thehill/8May2017]

What We Don't Know (And Wish We Did) About the Russia Investigation.  Members of the Senate are hosting the next matinee Monday in the long-running saga over Russia's meddling in the 2016 presidential election - but even after hours of hearings, there's still much the public doesn't know.

Many agencies and lawmakers are looking into attempted Russian influence. One of the most visible investigations has been plagued by conflict and controversy, and one of the most important investigations remains almost entirely classified.

So perhaps it's no surprise that central elements of the inquiries are still shrouded in mystery.

We know the US intelligence community has concluded that Moscow attempted to influence the election in Donald Trump's favor. Much of the evidence it used to reach that decision, however, is classified.  [Read More:  Domonoske/npr/8May2017]

Getting Intelligence Agencies to Adapt to Life Out of the Shadows.  Gone are the days when spy agencies did not officially exist with their personnel and activities guarded surreptitiously away from the public view. Today, the situation could not be more different. The US Office of the Director of National Intelligence has had a Tumblr account since 2014. NSA Director Admiral Mike Rogers appears regularly at conferences and panels. On the other side of the Atlantic, GCHQ Director Robert Hannigan writes op-eds for the Financial Times. GCHQ also recently broke a historical precedent of refusing to comment on allegations about its activities: the agency dismissed the unhelpful allegations about the agency's role in spying on Trump, made by Andrew Napolitano and then echoed by the White House, claiming that they were ‘utterly ridiculous and should be ignored'. In recent years, signals intelligence (SIGINT) agencies have been pro-actively trying to manage and shape their public perception.

Why are organisations that pride themselves on secrecy, and which have previously appeared allergic to press relations, now proactively getting their message out there? The answer is that they are increasingly communicating out of necessity.

It is no coincidence that many of the attempts by SIGINT agencies to interact with the public have occurred in the aftermath of the Snowden disclosures. SIGINT agencies have struggled to overcome the trust deficit and heightened skepticism over their activity. As traditionally clandestine organizations, the culture within SIGINT agencies contrasts starkly with a more vocal pro-privacy community and a Silicon Valley machinery that invests significant sums in promoting its own narrative. Former NSA Deputy Director Chirs Inglis also acknowledged last year that the recent Oliver Stone movie on Snowden could further shift public perceptions against intelligence agencies. Although SIGINT agencies should not necessarily take on the surveillance debate directly, they are still able to promote themselves in a positive way. Public appearances by senior SIGINT agency staff has led to the perception of a more transparent culture while reminding the public about how SIGINT programs have helped to diffuse recent terrorist attacks also helps to bring a more positive spin - GCHQ claims that information it has gathered stopped six alleged terrorist plots in 2015 alone.

In addition to the battle of public perception, SIGINT agencies have naturally become more communicative due to their expanded remit. Given their history and expertise, they have become the natural choice for governments delegating cybersecurity responsibilities. Yet while collecting signals intelligence is an inherently covert activity, confronting the cybersecurity challenge instead requires a more open and communicative response, such as providing businesses and households with targeted and specific security advice. The need for a departure from the traditional SIGINT mentality has been recognised in the United Kingdom. In 2016, the government established the National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC). The NCSC remains part of GCHQ, but is a distinct identity, and crucially one that is more far more publically facing. Although early days, the NCSC looks set to provide a more relevant and decisive leadership on the issue of cyber security.  [Read More:  cfr/4May2017]

Developing 21st Century Senior Intelligence Executives Into Leaders.  For far too long, the federal government in general and the intelligence community in particular have promoted individuals with outstanding technical expertise to the ranks of the Senior Executive Service with little to no regard for their abilities to lead.

I am a recently retired 35-year career employee, with 20 years in the SES in the US Department of Defense and the IC. I observed many well-intentioned employees who were brilliant in their technical or analytic fields become senior executives and then do an abysmal job. Once upon a time, the only way to get promoted to a senior position was to become a supervisor. While that has changed and there is now a dual track so technical experts can continue to advance without carrying major management responsibilities, we still have a tendency to promote those who have excelled in their technical fields to the SES. At the same time, we are not equipping them with the tools necessary to succeed as leaders.

I contend that leadership development programs, as preparation for the SES, should start on day one of an employee's career. Someone told me early in my career that the military had the corner on leadership and the civilians had the corner on management. What I learned along the way was that the military actually taught leadership skills - and infused them throughout all of its training curricula - and the civilian side of the house needed to do the same. Once I was in a position to do so, I set out to do just that. Everyone is a leader, and leader development is everyone's responsibility. It is not limited by pay band or General Schedule level, formal position, years of service, or those you know. Once this perspective is embraced, we can get on with the business of developing leaders.

When I was the Deputy Director of the DIA, I established a cohesive LDP. There were a number of leadership classes being offered at the time, but there was not a comprehensive program that developed our employees throughout their careers, adding to their knowledge base as they progressed through their careers. So we developed offerings for entry-level, mid-career, journeyman, and senior executives.  [Read More:  Long/govexec/3May2017]


Section IV - Events

AFIO EDUCATIONAL EVENTS IN COMING TWO MONTHS....

11 May 2017, 6:30 pm - Atlanta, GA - The AFIO Atlanta Chapter hosts Dr. Harvey Klehr - on "From Russia with Love - Soviet Agent Turned Bond Consultant: The Career of Joseph Katz."

Join us as AFIO Atlanta member Dr. Harvey Klehr -- one of the country's foremost historians on Soviet espionage against the United States in the 20th century -- presents on his recent article in Commentary magazine (available here). Moderated by Dr. Eddie Mienie, Executive Director for Strategic Studies and Partnerships at the University of North Georgia, The Military College of Georgia.
Program begins at 6:30 pm at Emory University School of Law, Gambrell Hall, First Floor, Classroom 1B (1301 Clifton Road, Atlanta, Georgia).

Cost: Free for members and special guests. RSVP: AFIO Atlanta President Brian Hooper at bhooper@wcsr.com or 404.879.2440.

Friday, 12 May 2017 - Tysons Corner, VA - AFIO National Spring Luncheon features NYTimes Washington Correspondent David Sanger on "Terrorism, Secret Wars, Nuclear Proliferation, and the Use of American Power," and Author Eva Dillon on "Living Life Undercover in a CIA Family"

David E. Sanger, Chief Washington Correspondent for the New York Times, speaks on "Terrorism, Secret Wars, Nuclear Proliferation, and the Use of American Power." His address starts at 1 p.m.
The 11 a.m. speaker is Eva Dillon, author and magazine publisher, on Spies in the Family: An American Spymaster, His Russian Crown Jewel, and the Friendship That Helped End the Cold War and join AFIO as we welcome and thank Marina, the granddaughter of Gen Polyakov present with us at this special event. Dillon's book is an engaging true-life memoir, of her CIA father and the Soviet double agent he handled - the highest ranking, longest serving asset the US had during the Cold War. It is also a memoir about both families growing up unknowingly as the children of spies.
"A beautifully written, profoundly moving account of one of the most important U.S Intelligence sources ever run inside the Soviet Union. A cliff-hanger from beginning to end, Dillon's account is filled with espionage tradecraft and family drama - essential reading for intelligence professionals, memoir enthusiasts, and anyone fascinated by how spying really works." -- Peter Earnest, Executive Director, International Spy Museum
Event location the Crowne Plaza (soon to be renamed DoubleTree-Hilton), Tysons Corner, VA, at 1960 Chain Bridge Rd, McLean, VA 22102.
Registration is here. Do so now to assure seating.

13 May 2017, 11:30 am - Patrick AFB, FL - The AFIO Florida Satellite Chapter hosts Alexander Penalta, J.D. on "Civilian Drone Operations: The Threat Over the Horizon."

The guest speaker at this Florida Satellite Chapter meeting will be Alexander Penalta, Esquire (Juris Doctor), on "Civilian Drone Operations: The Threat Over the Horizon in the Age of Counterterrorism."
Attorney Penalta is an American Business Litigation and Aviation Lawyer, fluent in English and Spanish, licensed to practice in Florida and Washington, DC, with offices throughout North and South Florida. He currently serves as Chief Counsel at the The Penalta Law Firm (www.penaltalaw.com) and is a partner member of FBI Infragard.
Penalta's presentation will be followed by Q&A by Dr. Joseph Finley Ph.D., a former FBI Special Agent, on "ISIS Terror Tactics."
Location: The Tides, 1001 N. Hwy A1A, Bldg #967, Patrick AFB, FL 32925
Times: 11:30 AM - 12:15 PM Social Hour, greet old, new members and guests (limited cash bar – honor system); 12:15 PM: Sit-Down lunch To Attend: Prepaid reservations are required which must be received by 5 May 2017. To reserve, send check ($25 member; $28 guests) and meal choice (Marinated Beef Flank Steak (B); Twin Seared Chicken Breast w/Artichoke and Caper Sauce (C) Vegetarian/vegan available) by first contacting FSC Chapter President at afiofsc@afio.com.

Thursday, 18 May 2017, 11:30 AM - Colorado Springs, CO - The AFIO Rocky Mountain Chapter hosts Dr. William E. Berry, discussing "North Korea's Nuclear Weapons and Missile Program."

Dr. William E. Berry, Jr. is currently an independent consultant specializing in East Asian security issues after retiring from the Air Force as a colonel in 1997. During his military career, he served in Vietnam, the Philippines, Korea, and Malaysia where he was the air attaché from 1990-1993. He also taught at the Air Force Academy, the National War College, and the Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies and was the senior military professor and chair of the Academy's Department of Political Science toward the end of his career. Dr. Berry completed his most recent book entitled Global Security Watch-Korea, published by Praeger/Greenwood Press in March 2008.
The presentation will begin with a review of how the Kim dynasty in North Korea has endured from 1948 to the present, passing from father (Kim Il Sung 1948-1994) to son (Kim Jong Il (1994-2011) to grandson (Kim Jong Un 2011-present) despite widespread famine, malnutrition, and other inhumane sufferings of the North Korean people. It will then proceed to detail the North Korean nuclear weapons programs and the development of missile delivery systems.
The nuclear program started in the 1980s with a graphite reactor provided by the Soviets with a demand that NK join the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT). In the early 2000s the US accused NK of developing a covert highly enriched uranium program. NK withdrew from the NPT and probably produced about 50 warheads. Some 5 underground tests were conducted with increasing yields. Three tests occurred under the regime of the current Kim Jong Un.
A missile delivery system has also been developed, resulting in more than 20 intermediate range missile tests in 2016. There are plans for Intercontinental ballistic missiles. There are still technological issues with miniaturization and hardening, fitting warhead to missile and surviving reentry into the atmosphere, guidance systems etc. But the regime is extremely serious in further development.
The presentation will conclude with an examination of possible rationales for the decision of the Kims to expend scarce economic resources to develop nuclear weapons and delivery systems.
For details, please RSVP to Tom VanWormer at robsmom@pcisys.net.

21 June 2017 (Wednesday), 11:30am - San Francisco, CA - The AFIO San Francisco Chapter hosts CMDR Waldron, a dual career path afloat operations and intelligence officer to discuss how the Coast Guard Intelligence program coordinates with the national law enforcement and intelligence communities to support and drive Coast Guard operations in the counter drug and homeland security missions.

WHERE: Basque Cultural Center, 599 Railroad Ave, South San Francisco, CA 94080. 11:30AM no host cocktail; meeting and luncheon at noon.
RSVP: Eventbrite link to follow. Reservation and pre-payment is required before 13 June 2017. The venue cannot accommodate walk-ins.
Contact: Mariko Kawaguchi, Board Secretary at afiosf@aol.com or Mariko Kawaguchi, c/o AFIO, PO Box 117578, Burlingame, CA 94011.

HOLD THE DATE - 28 - 29 September 2017 - Tysons Corner, VA - AFIO's 2017 National Intelligence Symposium

Tentative Agenda: • Opening Remarks by AFIO President; • NGA Overview and Q&A; • Video Presentation; • NGA Leadership Remarks (D/NGA or DD) - Includes GEOINT Strategy and Functional Management; • Lunch (with museum tours, NGA store, and group photo). Presentations/Panels on: • KH 8 Declassification; • Pathfinder (unclassified research to solve intel problems); • Commercial GEOINT Activity; and • the Small Satellite Revolution.
Arrive Wednesday evening, 27 September to overnight at the hotel to be ready early Thursday, 28 September, for coach service to NGA for all day conference including visit to their new museum. Welcome by NGA Director Robert Cardillo. Friday activities TBA. Friday evening is our "Spies in Black Ties" banquet.
Hotel: DoubleTree-Hilton, Tysons Corner, VA [formerly the Crowne Plaza], at 1960 Chain Bridge Rd, McLean, VA 22102. Details, event registration and hotel room registration links to be sent to all current members in coming weeks. Early phone-only room registrations can be made at 1-877-865-1877 at $119/nite.


Other Upcoming Events

Wednesday, 10 May 2017, noon - Washington, DC - Global Terrorism, Espionage and Cybersecurity Monthly Update - at the International Spy Museum

Learn the latest intelligence news from David Major, retired supervisory special agent of the FBI and former director of Counterintelligence and Security Programs at the NSC staff at the White House, for his briefing on the hottest intelligence and security issues, breaches, and penetrations. Presented in partnership with The Centre for Counterintelligence and Security Studies (CI Centre), these updates will cover worldwide events such as breaking espionage cases and arrest reports, cyber espionage incidents, and terrorist activity. Major uses his expertise to analyze trends and highlight emerging issues of interest to both intelligence and national security professionals and the public. Cases are drawn from the CI Centre's SPYPEDIA®, the most comprehensive source of espionage information in the world, containing events and information that may not be reported by mainstream media outlets. Event is free. Visit www.spymuseum.org.

16 May 2017, 11:30 am - 2 pm - McLean, VA - Defense Intelligence Forum hears from former FBI Special Agent Gary Harter on "The Insider Threat and Cyber Security."

The Defense Intelligence Forum (DIA Alumni Association) hears from former FBI Special Agent Gary Harter on "The Insider Threat and Cyber Security." Mr. Harter served 30 years with FBI. Most of this time was spenton various cases of insider threats. Attribution for this presentation will be provided at the beginning of the presentation to ensure a complete understanding of how the presented information should be handled

Event location: Pulcinella Restaurant, 6852 Old Dominion Dr, McLean, VA.
Registration starts at 1130 AM, lunch at noon.
Make reservations by 16 May 2017 by email to diforum@diaalumni.org. Include names, telephone numbers, and email addresses for self and guests. Choose Chicken Parmesan, Trout Lemone , Grilled Sausage with Sweet Peppers, Lasagna, Manicotti with Spinach and Ricotta, Cannelloni alla Bolognese, or Fettuccini with Portobello. Provide your luncheon selection with your reservation to reduce the wait time for your food. Pay online with a credit card or at the door with a check for $30 per person, payable to DIAA, Inc. Checks are preferred, but will accept cash; however, credit card payments are discouraged.

Wednesday, 17 May 2017, 7-10pm - Washington, DC - Dinner with Spies: An Evening with N. John MacGaffin III and William Ross Newland III - at the International Spy Museum

What's it like to be a CIA Chief of Station? To manage all the CIA's operations in a country that may not be too happy with your work if you are discovered? Does it take nerves of steel? A brilliant mind? Or a good sense of humor? Possibly all of the above, if you judge by tonight's guests of honor: John MacGaffin and Ross Newland. These intelligence experts have nearly 60 years of CIA service between them. Their extraordinary intelligence careers have taken them to some of the most interesting and tension filled places in the world. Of their many overseas assignments, MacGaffin had four postings as chief of station, primarily in the Middle East; and Newland had three including Bucharest and Havana. Although some of their toughest assignments were at home forging relationships between the CIA and FBI, and the CIA and the US military. At this spirited dinner, you'll discover the reality behind a job that is frequently featured in films and television - MacGaffin serves as an advisor to the Homeland series! You will be one of only twenty guests at The Riggsby for this delicious four-course dinner of upscale American cuisine with European influences. Tickets for the general public: $225, tickets for Spy Museum Inner Circle Members: $200. Visit www.spymuseum.org.

Thursday, 25 May 2017 10 am - 11:30 am - Fort Meade, MD - National Cryptologic Museum's Schorreck Lecture: "Codebreaking and the Battle of Midway" with Author/Historian Elliot Carlson

2017 Henry F. Schorreck Lecture Speaker Series features Elliot Carlson, author of the celebrated biography of CMDR Joseph Rochefort (cryptologic hero of the Battle of Midway) - Joe Rochefort's War: The Odyssey of the Codebreaker Who Outwitted Yamamoto at Midway. Carlson's talk will be "Codebreaking and the Battle of Midway: When Cryptanalysis Came of Age." More about Carlson's book is here.

On 3-7 June 1942, the US defeated Japan in the Battle of Midway, one of the most decisive battles in world history. The battle regained the initiative in the Pacific for the US after its setback at Pearl Harbor on 7 December 1941 while placing Japan on the strategic defensive from which it never fully recovered. On the 75th Anniversary of this US naval victory, Carlson discusses the pivotal role that intelligence played in it. In particular, the breaking of JN-25, the Japanese Imperial Fleet's operational code, by codebreakers at Station Hypo in Hawaii led by CMDR Joseph Rochefort USN.
Carlson holds degrees from Stanford University (MA) and the University of Oregon (BS); he lives with his wife in Silver Spring, MD.

RSVP: Advanced registration required since this popular NCM Schorreck Lecture Series always has a full house. So, to not lose a spot, email history@nsa.gov and/or gjnedve@nsa.gov and provide the number of seats you will need. They will confirm your reservations and answer any questions.
Event location: National Cryptologic Museum: 9900 Colony Seven Rd, Fort Meade, MD. Directions here.

4 - 7 June 2017 - San Antonio, TX - USGIF GEOINT 2017 Symposium theme is: "Advancing Capabilities to Meet Emerging Threats"

The always impressive US Geospatial-Intelligence Foundation (USGIF) is offering more than 25 training and professional development sessions at their GEOINT 2017 Symposium on "Advancing Capabilities to Meet Emerging Threats" being held in beautiful San Antonio, TX. Monday, June 5 through Wednesday, June 7 are a variety of training sessions running two hours each. Attendees receive 0.2 Continuing Education Units per qualified session. Expand your knowledge on a familiar topic or learn a new one in one of the hottest, most promising and useful fields in the Intelligence Community. Sessions include: Hacking for Defense: Solving National Security Problems; 3D Terrain Modeling; Analytics for Small Sat Systems; Recent Advances in Deep Learning Cognitive Social Media Analytics Framework; Open Geospatial Machine Learning; Cyber Attack and Defense Wargame with IT, Industrial, and GEOINT Context; And much more.
Location: Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center, San Antonio, TX.
RSVP ASAP: Agenda and other information here.

20 June 2017, 10 am to 1 pm - Annapolis Junction, MD - NCMF 2017 Summer Cryptologic Program features David Priess on The President's Daily Brief. Special NSA/NCMF WWI Panel Discussions on "Decoding The Great War" and Presentations of the new WWI Exhibit takes place.

Program features Mr. David Priess, former CIA Intelligence Officer and author of the bestseller The President's Book of Secrets. This National Cryptologic Museum Foundation event can be signed up for here
Where: CACI, Inc. located at 2720 Technology Drive, Annapolis Junction, MD 20701, Tel 301-575-3200. Directions and Map here. Click "directions" to get driving guidance.
RSVP NOW: register online here or mail registration fee of $20 (members) or $50 (guests, includes one-year membership) to NCMF, PO Box 1682, Fort George G. Meade, MD 20755-9998. Please register prior to 23 March to ensure space available. Click image at left for larger version of announcement.

Also on 20 June, following the Priess presentation above, NSA's Center for Cryptologic History joins the Museum to host a WWI Panel Discussion: Decoding The Great War and Presentation of the new World War One Exhibit at the National Cryptologic Museum.

Presentations and speakers are:
Presentation 1: 1305 - World War I as an Intelligence Revolution, Michael Warner, Command Historian, US Cyber Command.
Presentation 2: 1325 - An Ear to the Air and an Ear to the Ground: Radio Intelligence in the American Expeditionary Forces, 1917-1918, Betsy Rohaly Smoot, Historian, Center for Cryptologic History, NSA.
Presentation 3: 1345 - Native American Code Talkers: the Secret Weapon of World War I, Dr. Steve Huffman, Retired Research Analyst, NSA. Q&A: 1345 - 1400 1405 - 1430: Presentation of World War 1 Display - Betsy Rohaly Smoot. For details on each of the presentations and speakers, or to register for one or both of these NSA/NCMF Events, use this link.

18 October 2017, 9 am - 3 pm - Laurel, MD - NCMF General Meeting & Symposium: "How Cyber has Changed the World Around Us."

SAVE THE DATE. Information coming in July. Details will be at www.cryptologicfoundation.org.
Event location: The Kossiakoff Center, Johns Hopkins University/Applied Physics Laboratory.

19 - 20 October 2017 - Laurel, MD - 16th NSA/CSS Center for Cryptologic History Symposium: "Milestones, Memories, and Momentum."

SAVE THE DATE. Information forthcoming. This symposium will be followed on 21 October 2017 with tours and workshops at the National Cryptologic Museum.
Location: Kossiakoff Conference Center, Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, Maryland.
For more about the program, visit www.nsa.gov

PAPERS for this event: The theme for the 2017 Symposium will be "Milestones, Memories, and Momentum." There are many milestones to mark in 2017: the 160th anniversary of the first attempt to span the Atlantic with a telegraph cable, 100 years since both the entry of the United States into World War I and the Russian October Revolution, and 75 years after the World War II battles of Coral Sea and Midway. The Symposium will take place just a few months before the 50th anniversary of the Tet Offensive in Vietnam, and during the 25th year after the fall of the Soviet Union and the end of the Cold War. Papers looking at these milestone events in cryptology and considering how we remember their significance are particularly encouraged, as are those examining how cryptologic advances from these times provided momentum to create the systems of today and the future. Your proposal package should include an abstract of no more than ONE page, a complete CV, a short biographical sketch (not to exceed 150 words) to be used in the program, the amount of time you require for your paper, and full contact details. Panel proposals should include the above for each presenter and a short explanation of the panel's theme. Please submit your proposal by noon on Monday, February 6, 2017, to Program Chair Betsy Rohaly Smoot at history@nsa.gov or to her care at The Center for Cryptologic History, Suite 6886, 9800 Savage Road, Fort George G. Meade, MD 20755. Please note that correspondence that does not include the suite number may not be delivered in a timely manner. Proposals received after noon on February 6 will be considered on a space-available basis. The program committee will notify you about the final status of your proposal by June 9, 2017, but may engage you in discussions before that date. See details here.


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