AFIO Weekly Intelligence Notes #27-11 dated 19 July 2011

[Editors' Note: The WIN editors attempt to include a wide range of articles and commentary in the Weekly Notes to inform and educate our readers. However, the views expressed in the articles are purely those of the authors, and in no way reflect support or endorsement from the WIN editors or the AFIO officers and staff. We welcome comments from the WIN readers on any and all articles and commentary.]
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CONTENTS

Section I - INTELLIGENCE HIGHLIGHTS

Section II - CONTEXT & PRECEDENCE

Section III - COMMENTARY

Section IV - Books, Obituaries and Coming Events

Books

Obituaries

Coming Educational Events

Current Calendar New and/or Next Two Months ONLY
 

SPECIAL NEWS AND EVENT HIGHLIGHT

REGISTER NOW
FOR AFIO NATIONAL SUMMER LUNCHEON

FRIDAY, 12 August 2011

--

MORNING speaker [11 a.m.]

Mike Rogers

The Chairman of the
House Permanent Select Committee
on Intelligence


Rep. Michael J. Rogers (R-MI 8th District)
former FBI

Remarks are ON THE RECORD

--

1 p.m. speaker

T.B.D.

Check in for badge pickup at 10:30 a.m.
Chairman Mike Rogers gives address at 11 a.m.
Afternoon Speaker [T.B.D.] will give address at 1 p.m.

Lunch is served at noon.
Event closes at 2 p.m.
--
EVENT LOCATION: The Crowne Plaza
1960 Chain Bridge Road • McLean, Virginia 22102
Driving directions here or use this link: http://tinyurl.com/8228kw

Register Now To Be Certain of Space

            Raleigh Spy Conference

24 - 26 August 2011 - Raleigh, NC - "Spies Among Us - The Secret World of Illegals" - theme of the 7th Raleigh Spy Conference

Special guests/speakers: Michael Hayden, former DCIA and DIRNSA; Michael Sulick, former Director of the National Clandestine Service, CIA
Returning presenters:
Brian Kelley
, CIA & Professor at Institute of World Politics;
Nigel West - world-famous intelligence author/speaker - former Member of Parliament;
Dan Mulvenna - RCMP/CASIS
Writer's Roundtable to feature Douglas Waller, author of Wild Bill Donovan, about the founder of the Office of Strategic Services — the World War 11 forerunner of the CIA — will serve as anchor. Other authors on the roundtable are David Wise, often called 'the dean of intelligence authors,' to discuss his new book Tiger Trap: America’s Secret Spy War With America, and Kent Clizbe, author of Willing Accomplices, a book concerning the continuing influence of Soviet propaganda on Western academia and media and other noted writers in the field.

New to the conference this year: The Historical Collections Division of the Office of Information Services of the Central Intelligence Agency will present a few booklets of recently declassified secret documents, ranging from the Korean War, the Warsaw Pact, Air America, martial law in Poland, the Soviet invasion of Czechoslovakia, and the papers of controversial CIA director Richard Helms. Officials from CIA’s Historical Division will be on hand in Raleigh to discuss their work and answer individual questions.

For more information: www.raleighspyconference.com
email: cyndi@metromagazine.com
Location: North Carolina Museum of History, Downtown Raleigh, NC


Scholarship Deadline Extended to Monday, August 1

Sticker shock at credit-hour costs for an intelligence education?
Let AFIO help with the high cost of an intelligence career-oriented field of study.
We have generous scholarships remaining for U.S. citizens in U.S. undergraduate or graduate schools. And applicants can do the entire, brief application online - once - to be considered for all available AFIO scholarships. But do not delay. The new and final deadline is Monday, August 1, 2011.

Explore scholarship options here and apply.


Upcoming CIA Historical Collections Division Events:

Monday, 26 September 2011 - Boston, MA - CIA's Historical Collections Division Conference "Piercing the Iron Curtain: The Use of Technology to Resolve the Missile Gap" at JFK Presidential Library

Scope: The Missile Gap was an episode in American history that was in effect a misperception of the rate of soviet ICBM deployment relative to US ICBM deployment. The United States and USSR were in a race to develop long range missiles. Because of the tight Soviet security, the US had little evidence about the USSRs progress developing intercontinental ballistic missiles. At the outset, ignorance of the Soviet ICBM program abounded, projections of potential missile production became estimates, Soviet ICBM testing , Khrushchev's boasting, USAF mirror imaging, and setbacks in US ICBM development yielded wild estimates of a critical gap between US and the Soviet ICBM capabilities. CIA developed new collection, processing and analytic capabilities that ultimately solved the "Gap" issue—for all but the USAF. 185 documents.

EVENT LOCATION: JFK Presidential Library, Boston, MA.

Details about event to follow from AFIO as we get closer to event.

Thursday, 27 October 2011 - Washington, DC - CIA Historical Collections Division Conference: "A City Torn Apart; Building the Berlin Wall - 1961"

Scope: For nearly 50 years the German City of Berlin was the living symbol of the Cold War. The Soviets closed the Sector Border dividing East Berlin from West Berlin on August 13th, 1961, effectively establishing what become known as the Berlin Wall. This symposium focused on the events leading up to the establishment of the Berlin Wall. The period covered included the Vienna Conference on 3 June to the confrontation at Checkpoint Charlie on 27 October 1961.

EVENT LOCATION: National Archives and Records Administration, Washington, DC
Contributors will include NATO, ARMY, JFK & LBJ Presidential Libraries, SHAEF, and State Department

Details about event to follow from AFIO as we get closer to event.

2 November 2011 - Simi Valley, CA - CIA Historical Collections Division Conference: "Ronald Reagan, Intelligence, and the End of the Cold War"

Scope: President Reagan and his use of intelligence in the formulation of US-Soviet policy. The symposium will feature high-level former policymakers, intelligence practitioners, intelligence analysts, and historians discussing how the Reagan Administration used intelligence in making policies to end the Cold War. As part of this event, the CIA is releasing a collection of some 200 declassified documents, including intelligence assessments, research papers, National Intelligence Estimates, high-level memos, and briefing materials provided to the Administration during this period. The collection includes several video briefings prepared by the CIA's Directorate of Intelligence and delivered to policymakers on such varied topics as the Soviet space program, the Andropov succession, the Chernobyl disaster, and the Moscow summit. 200 documents

Event Location: Ronald Reagan Presidential Library, Simi Valley, CA

Partners: Center for the Study of Intelligence, Ronald Reagan Presidential Library

Details about event to follow from AFIO as we get closer to event


   

Section I - INTELLIGENCE HIGHLIGHTS

U.K. Lawmakers Request More Scrutiny of Intelligence Services. U.K. Lawmakers tasked with scrutinizing the intelligence services have requested the power to insist those agencies answer their questions, as part of a wider revision of their role.

The Intelligence and Security Committee, made up of members from the lower and upper houses of the U.K. Parliament, reports on the activities of the Security Service, known as MI5, the Secret Intelligence Service, or MI6, and the Government Communications Headquarters. It produces an annual report for the prime minister, a censored version of which is published.

Today's report recommends the panel should get the power to investigate operations, on top of its current oversight of policy, administration and finances. Only government ministers should be able to say an agency should refuse to answer the committee's questions on a subject, it said. At present, agency heads make that decision. [Read more:  Hutton/Bloomberg/13July2011] 

Georgia Says Detained Photographer Has Links to Russian Spies. Georgia said a photographer detained on suspicion of espionage has links to two Russians expelled for spying five years ago.

Zurab Qurtsikidze from the European Pressphoto Agency was arrested July 7 along with presidential photographer Irakli Gedenidze, Gedenidze's wife Natia, and Foreign Ministry photographer Giorgi Abdaladze. A court in Tbilisi ordered July 9 that Qurtsikidze, Gedenidze and Abdaladze be held for two months while they await trial. Natia Gedenidze was released on bail.

"Qurtsikidze has links to the spy scandal members from 2006," Interior Minister Vano Merabishvili told reporters today in Tbilisi. "He is suspected of having made phone and possibly other contact since 2004 and we have enough evidence." [Read more:  Bedwell/Bloomberg/13July2011] 

Intelligence and Security Committee Wants More Power. A committee of MPs and Peers wants to be able to order intelligence officers to provide it with information as part of a proposed overhaul of its powers.

In its annual report, the Intelligence and Security Committee (ISC) also called on the prime minister to give up his right to see its reports first.

The committee oversees the work of MI5, MI6 and the Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ).

It says its structure has become "significantly out of date".

The 2010/11 annual report covers issues including cyber-security, the London Olympics and the Government's cost-cutting.

In it, the Intelligence and Security Committee asks that its remit be extended from covering the security agencies' policies, administration and finances to their operations as well. [Read more:  BBC/13June2011] 

U.S. Official: CIA Interrogating Terror Suspects in Somalia. CIA operatives have secretly traveled to Mogadishu, Somalia, to help interrogate terrorism suspects about operations in East Africa and Yemen, a senior U.S. official told CNN Tuesday.

The official, who was not authorized to speak publicly, stressed any suspects were under the control of Somali forces and the CIA was present only in "support" of interrogations in recent months. He described the number of times the CIA was present as "very small," adding that he would only say it was "one or two times."

"Only on very rare occasion does the CIA support debriefings of suspected terrorists who are in TFG (Transitional Federal Government) custody," the official told CNN. [Read more:  CNN/12July2011] 

Physics Student Awaits Espionage Trial in Iran. A doctoral student who was detained when he tried to leave his native Iran earlier this year will go on trial tomorrow for charges related to espionage, according to sources close to him.

Omid Kokabee has been detained since late January or February this year when he was attempting to fly from Tehran airport to return to his studies at the University of Texas at Austin, US. Physics World understands that he is suspected of leaking Iranian scientific information and working with the CIA.

The trial, apparently based on charges of illegal earnings and communicating with a hostile government, is expected to be headed by Iranian justice Abolghasem Salavati. [Read more:  PhysicsWorld/16July2011] 

Former Spy Official Avoids Jail in Leak Case. A former U.S. spy-agency official who admitted leaking information to the media was sentenced to one year of probation and community service Friday, a quiet end to a case that began with the Obama administration filing a long list of felony charges against him.

The Justice Department initially charged Thomas A. Drake, a former senior official in the National Security Agency's electronic eavesdropping division, with 10 felony violations, including several under the Espionage Act, for allegedly mishandling classified information and making false statements to federal agents investigating national-security leaks to the media.

Prosecutions against government leakers have been rare, but the Obama administration has brought five such cases. Mr. Drake's case was to be the first trial in the administration's stepped-up efforts.

The parties reached a last-minute plea deal in June, with Mr. Drake pleading guilty to a single misdemeanor charge of misusing a government computer to gather information that he leaked to a Baltimore Sun reporter. The plea agreement marked a significant retreat for the government, which didn't seek jail time for Mr. Drake.

Under the reduced charges, Mr. Drake faced a maximum of a year in prison. Prosecutors did seek a fine of $50,000, an amount 10 times what was called for in federal sentencing guidelines. [Read more:  Kendall/WSJ/16July2011] 

An Appeal to China's Top Leader. The mother of a Taiwanese spy who has been jailed in China for more than 12 years wrote to Chinese President Hu Jintao recently, asking him to show leniency and release her son as soon as possible, a local daily reported Saturday.

Chen Yi-shan, 82, wrote in her letter to Hu two weeks ago that she hoped to see her son Yang Ming-chung before her death, according to the China Times report. [Read more:  FocusTaiwan/16July2011]

Professor Denied Appointment at Yale Sues CIA and FBI. Juan Cole, a noted Middle East expert and outspoken critic of the Israeli government who was denied a faculty appointment at Yale in 2006, sued the CIA and FBI on Wednesday.

The University of Michigan history professor and the American Civil Liberties Union have filed a case asking for the "immediate expedited processing" of Freedom of Information Act requests for documents pertaining to Cole that they submitted to the CIA, FBI, Office of the Director of National Intelligence and Department of Justice on June 23. The lawsuit marks an attempt by Cole to determine whether the George W. Bush administration sought to discredit him and if the CIA spied on him illegally.

"The CIA is specifically forbidden, in its charter and by statute, from spying on American citizens," Cole told the News in an email earlier this month, prior to going to court. "It is shocking because it shows how criminal and insecure the Bush White House was." [Read more:  Burt&Griswold/YaleDailyNews/16July2011] 

Lithuania Shocked as Austria Frees Ex-KGB Man. Lithuania has demanded answers from Austria after Vienna police freed a wanted former KGB general just 24 hours after his arrest.

Officials believe Mikhail Golovatov was behind a Soviet crackdown after the Baltic State declared independence.

"The prosecutor-general's office regretfully regards the actions of the Austrian authorities as a gross violation of EU and international law," said Andrius Nevera, deputy prosecutor-general.

But Austrian diplomats say the European arrest warrant issued by Lithuania was too vague to merit Golovatov's continued detention - a charge denied by Vilnius. [Read more:  EuroNews/17July2011] 

Photographer "Admits He Spied for Russia." The last of three photographers charged with espionage confessed on Saturday to spying for Russia, Georgia's Interior Ministry said - a claim that surprised the photographer's own lawyer.

Ramaz Chinchaladze, lawyer for photographer Georgy Abdaladze, said his client insisted on his innocence in a meeting just ten minutes before the reported confession.

"He insisted that he was innocent, but he confessed later at a meeting with prosecutors and the investigator. We were very surprised," Chinchaladze told AP.

Three photographers in Georgia were arrested and charged with spying last week: Irakli Gedenidze, the personal photographer of President Mikhail Saakashvili, Zurab Kurtsikidze of the European Pressphoto Agency and Abdaladze, who has worked for the Georgian Foreign Ministry and freelanced for AP.

Gedenidze was shown on television last week confessing to giving EPA photographer Kurtsikidze details of the president's itinerary, motorcade route and offices. Kurtsikidze confessed to spying for Russia on Friday, according to his lawyers. [Read more:  GulfNews/17July2011] 

Whizz Kids Deserting the Spy World as Threat of Attacks Increases. GCHQ is losing "whizz kid" specialists to Google, Microsoft, and Amazon because they can triple their pay, the head of the agency has warned. 

Iain Lobban, the director of GCHQ, the intelligence agency responsible for listening into the chatter of foreign spies and terrorists, has said he can offer his staff a "fantastic mission" but struggles with salaries.

Some of the most challenging work that GCHQ undertakes is to fight off cyber attacks by foreign intelligence agencies such as China and Russia that are targeting gas, water and electricity suppliers in Britain, according to the parliamentary Intelligence and Security Committee.

In comments carried in the committee's annual report, Mr. Lobban said: "I need some real internet whizzes in order to do cyber and I am not even sure they are even on the contractor market, so I need to work on that.

"They will be working for Microsoft or Google or Amazon or whoever. And I can't compete with their salaries. I can offer them a fantastic mission, but I can't compete with their salaries.

"I probably have to do better than I am doing at the moment, or else my internet whizzes are not going to stay" and we do have a steady drip, I am afraid. [Read more: Gardham/Telegraph/13July2011]

24,000 Pentagon Files Stolen in Major Cyberattack. The Department of Defense says it was hit by a cyberattack by a "foreign intelligence service" that managed to pilfer 24,000 sensitive files. The attack, which occurred in March, was perpetrated by an unnamed "nation state," according to Deputy Defense Secretary William J. Lynn III, who disclosed the breach during a speech Thursday outlining the Pentagon's new cyber strategy for dealing with cyber-breaches.

The Washington Post reports that the files were stolen from a defense contractor. Lynn did not name the "nation state" involved, nor did he disclose the nature of the files that were stolen. The admission of the breach appears to be nothing more than a justification of the Department of Defense's new "Strategy for Operating in Cyberspace" .

The new strategy, outlined in the afore-linked 19-page document, has five "strategic initiatives," or "goals."

1. Treat cyberspace as an "operational domain" with specially organized, trained, and equipped forces.

2. Employ new defense operating concepts to protect DoD networks and systems.

3. Partner with other U.S. government departments to enable a "whole-of-government" cybersecurity strategy.

4. Build relationships with U.S. allies and international partners.

5. Recruit, educate and train "the nation's ingenuity" to help improve cybersecurity.

Under the new cybersecurity guidelines, a cyberattack could be considered an act of war, and warrant a "proportional and justified military response at the time and place of its choosing," Lynn said. Of course, for a cyberattack to be considered an act of war, it must bring effects comparable to those brought about in a more traditional act of war--massive damage, massive human losses, or significant economic damages.

"It would be in those circumstances that I think the President would consider all the tools he has - economic, diplomatic, and as a last resort, military," Lynn said. [Read more: Purewal/PCWorld/15July2011]

CIA Puts Bin Laden Hunter Under "Cover." A CIA analyst who played a lead role in locating Osama bin Laden was placed under cover by the agency this month because of new threat information indicating he might be targeted by al-Qaeda, U.S. officials said Monday.

The move is a highly unusual one for the CIA, which typically takes steps to protect its employees' identities only when they are embarking on sensitive operations or travel overseas.

A U.S. official said that the decision was driven by new information about possible efforts by al-Qaeda to seek revenge for the U.S. raid that ended with the death of bin Laden at a compound in Abbottabad, Pakistan in May.

"We know from very recent intelligence that al-Qaeda is interested in finding U.S. counter-terrorism officials tied to the CIA's aggressive counter-terrorism operations," a U.S. official said, speaking on the condition of anonymity to discuss sensitive intelligence matters. "Surely the vast majority of Americans understand why this individual needs to be protected."

The step comes amid speculation online about the analyst's identity, and efforts to single him out in now-iconic photos showing President Obama and other national security officials gathered in the White House situation room on the night of the bin Laden raid.

The CIA refused to comment on the identities of unnamed individuals in the photos - which were released by the White House - or on speculation that has surfaced in Internet publications and blogs.

CIA spokesman George Little said, "It's simply unnecessary for media outlets to report identifying information of any kind that could help al-Qaeda and other militants find patriotic Americans who are countering the terrorist threat." [Read more: Miller/WashingtonPost/11July2011]


Section II - CONTEXT & PRECEDENCE

Wali Karzai: Drug Baron, CIA Agent or Afghan Defender? Ahmed Wali Karzai, the Afghan president's assassinated younger brother, was either a drug baron, a CIA agent or a fierce defender of the Afghan people, depending on who you listen to.

What is beyond dispute is that he was a controversial figure and a warlord who commanded tremendous power over Kandahar, one of the most restive provinces of the war-torn country and the spiritual home of the Taliban.

The son of a well-to-do political family from an influential Pashtun tribe, the Popalzai, he headed the provincial council in Kandahar for seven years, where he was widely considered to control all commercial and political dealings.

His powerful role necessitated regular talks with American forces waging a counterinsurgency in the key Taliban battleground.

But leaked cables released last year revealed true US feelings about the president's half-brother, who was long dogged by claims of unsavoury links with the lucrative opium trade and private security firms. [Red more:  Dawn/12July2011] 

The CIA's Secret Sites in Somalia. Nestled in a back corner of Mogadishu's Aden Adde International Airport is a sprawling walled compound run by the Central Intelligence Agency. Set on the coast of the Indian Ocean, the facility looks like a small gated community, with more than a dozen buildings behind large protective walls and secured by guard towers at each of its four corners. Adjacent to the compound are eight large metal hangars, and the CIA has its own aircraft at the airport. The site, which airport officials and Somali intelligence sources say was completed four months ago, is guarded by Somali soldiers, but the Americans control access. At the facility, the CIA runs a counterterrorism training program for Somali intelligence agents and operatives aimed at building an indigenous strike force capable of snatch operations and targeted "combat" operations against members of Al Shabab, an Islamic militant group with close ties to Al Qaeda.

"The implications of allowing a US citizen to assemble a legion in any foreign country, and especially in a combustible region like the Middle East, are serious and wide-ranging," they allege.

As part of its expanding counterterrorism program in Somalia, the CIA also uses a secret prison buried in the basement of Somalia's National Security Agency (NSA) headquarters, where prisoners suspected of being Shabab members or of having links to the group are held. Some of the prisoners have been snatched off the streets of Kenya and rendered by plane to Mogadishu. While the underground prison is officially run by the Somali NSA, US intelligence personnel pay the salaries of intelligence agents and also directly interrogate prisoners. The existence of both facilities and the CIA role was uncovered by The Nation during an extensive on-the-ground investigation in Mogadishu. Among the sources who provided information for this story are senior Somali intelligence officials; senior members of Somalia's Transitional Federal Government (TFG); former prisoners held at the underground prison; and several well-connected Somali analysts and militia leaders, some of whom have worked with US agents, including those from the CIA. A US official, who confirmed the existence of both sites, told The Nation, "It makes complete sense to have a strong counterterrorism partnership" with the Somali government. [Read more:  Scahill/TheNation/12July2011] 

Interview with T.H.E. Hill, Author of The Day Before the Berlin Wall: Could We Have Stopped It? August 13th, 2011 marks the 50th Anniversary of the construction of the Berlin Wall. Today I am talking with T.H.E. Hill, the author of a novel entitled The Day Before the Berlin Wall: Could We Have Stopped It?: An Alternate History of Cold War Espionage, a spy action thriller that's an even better story than his highly lauded first novel, Voices Under Berlin. 

Thus far, Hill's new novel has been selected as a finalist in the "Thriller" category at the prestigious NIEA Book Awards, but it hasn't been out as long as his first, which has netted Hill six book awards. [Read more:  Novacheck/SeattlePI/17July2011]

John Le Carre Interviewed. 'I worked for MI6 in the Sixties, during the great witch-hunts,' said John le Carré

The Secret Intelligence Service I knew occupied dusky suites of little rooms opposite St James's Park Tube station in London. The higher you went, the more secret. The chief himself - Control in my books - lived on the fourth floor of a crooked little building at the end of a creepy, spidery corridor and then up a small staircase.

As you walked up to be received by the chief, you saw yourself distorted in a great fisheye mirror, in the eyeline of the beady women I call the Mothers, who were in charge of the front office.

I worked for MI6 in the Sixties, during the great witch-hunts, when the shared paranoia of the Cold War gripped the services. Kim Philby and George Blake had already been unmasked.

'You're leaky,' the Americans would say to us.

'You've got traitors in your midst.'

That whispering, that tension, went on working through me after I left and I tried to express it in Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy.

Reports of the leaks were coming in from prominent Soviet defectors who were being kept in secret, all of them bubbling about the idea of another mole in MI6. This infected the story - I wanted to recreate that secret world, the people living in a bubble, trusting nobody. The mystery of who said what to whom.

Everyone was looking over everybody else's shoulder. Character defects that might make someone vulnerable to a blackmailer were scrutinised. Was he a homosexual? Did he keep a mistress? Was he financially reckless? Was there a whiff of communism about him? You had nobody to trust but your colleagues. You didn't tell your wife what you were doing - or very few did. You didn't tell your girlfriends, your boyfriends or whatever you had. So you were thrown upon one another and then you didn't trust one another; a secret world within a secret world. The excitement of life was about who you worked with and who you shared your secrets with, and that's a very short step to the bed. [Read more:  DailyMail/15July2011] 

Petraeus's Next Battle. The young man peered into a basement office at the White House, where a pair of military officers sat talking. "Does anyone know where General Petraeus is?" he asked. "I'm right here," the general answered, raising his hand. "They want you in the Oval, sir," the aide said.

This was June 2010, and Gen. David Petraeus was in charge of Central Command, one of the supreme jobs in the U.S. armed forces. But that was about to change. Minutes before, the president had fired Gen. Stanley McChrystal, the commander in Afghanistan. As Petraeus climbed the narrow staircase and headed down the short corridor to the Oval Office, the president's national-security team was filing out: Defense Secretary Robert Gates, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, CIA Director Leon Panetta, and others. Petraeus knew them all, but they avoided eye contact, like physicians about to deliver a grim diagnosis.

Inside, Barack Obama was alone. He motioned Petraeus to a chair by the fireplace and made small talk as they sat down. Then he said: "As your president and commander in chief, I am asking you to take over command in Afghanistan." To a request like that Petraeus saw only one response. "Yes, sir," Petraeus replied. He would be accepting what was formally a demotion to go back to the field. Nine days later, the dutiful soldier was unpacking his bags in Kabul.

Now, after 13 months, the 58-year-old Petraeus is coming home to head the Central Intelligence Agency. Since that day in the Oval Office, hopeful signs have begun appearing that he may have performed the seemingly impossible task of stabilizing the Afghan battlefield. He achieved a similar feat four years ago in Iraq, turning its savage killing fields into a more manageable landscape of political infighting and chronic but relatively small-scale violence. In both countries, merely staving off complete disaster looked enough like victory to allow the Obama administration to start pulling out troops. "I've always said this would be very hard, but it can be done," Petraeus told NEWSWEEK during a series of interviews this month in Afghanistan. "That's still my view." [Read more:  Newsweek/17July2011] 

The Poor Man's Spy Museum. Located in Ft. Meade, a few blocks from the curtain-walled NSA headquarters, the National Cryptologic Museum is housed in a former Colony 7 Motor Inn that dates back to the 1960s. The motel was a bit too close for comfort for the NSA, so the agency bought it in 1987 and turned it into a museum in 1993. Now, instead of dinner theatre, the old motel hosts a kitschy array of exhibits on cryptology that serve as the national intelligence community's only public museum. [Read more: Caldwell/dcist/14July2011]


Section III - COMMENTARY

Why It's Just Plain Wrong for Gawker to ID a CIA Agent. With everything else going on here in the U.S. and around the globe, it's possible you may have missed this little gem of a story. Let me try to succinctly set the stage while you pour yourself a drink and prepare to smack yourself in the forehead with amazement. Or disgust.

I'll preface by saying that the takedown of Al Qaeda's terror mastermind Usama bin Laden was a painstaking, labor intensive decade-long effort involving dedicated folks from numerous agencies and organizations. These people toiled for years trying to piece together countless bits of information... sifting for any credible lead, chasing down potential sources, carrying out surveillance, interviewing and analyzing every word from detainees, working every angle and never giving up.

All that work is what allowed the Navy SEALs to do what they do best and close the deal. The men and women of the CIA, FBI, NSA and other shops carried out the operations, the analysis, the surveillance, the interrogations and the investigations that brought us to Bin Laden's posh digs in Abbottabad.

Now here's the thing. All these good people do their jobs without expectation of big money, fame or recognition. They don't want the spotlight. Public recognition is not a useful thing when your job is clandestine operations. That's not tough to figure out.

And yet, just the other day the Associated Press decided to write a story profiling, without actually naming, a CIA analyst who had been a key member of the team working to locate Bin Laden. The AP had reportedly agreed to a U.S. government request not to identify the analyst - for what you and I would consider obvious reasons. [Read more:  Baker/FoxNews/12July2011]

Whittaker Chambers (1901-1961): Ghosts and Phantoms. Whittaker Chambers died 50 years ago today at the age of 60. Much in the world has changed since then. What might he think about world affairs today, were he still alive?

Before commenting, he would catch up on history with books like Tony Judt's Postwar. Another would be Timothy Snyder's Bloodlands, which accounts for millions of deaths during Chambers' most active years. During the same period covered in Bloodlands, he wrote his first major piece for The New Masses, entered and defected from the Soviet underground, and worked at TIME magazine. Always a historian, he would crave hindsight into his own times. Such books would also help explain the demise of Great Illegals he knew and occasionally admired, including Alexander Ulanovsky, Ignatz Reiss, and Walter Krivitsky.

Today's map of the world might shock him. He would see no Soviet Bloc. Yet quickly he would find Vladimir Putin's Russia very familiar. He might revisit his TIME essay on Yalta, "The Ghosts on the Roof." This time, he would add the Bolsheviks to the Romanovs, as they admire Putin. Or he might renew efforts on his follow-on to Witness, a book called The Third Rome (never completed, though portions appear in the posthumous Cold Friday). To do so, he would have to face the rise of China. How ironic that this strategic nation - once overseen by Alger Hiss in the State Department’s Far Eastern Affairs section - has survived as the last great bastion of Communism. More ironic, China has turned to Capitalism in the past few decades and come to rival America itself.

He wrote in Witness: "I know that I am leaving the winning side for the losing side, but it is better to die on the losing side than to live under Communism." Today, with Soviet Communism dead and Chinese Communism alive but capitalist, would he conclude that the Chinese have also chosen the losing side? [Read more: Chambers/whittakerchambers.org/9July2011]

U.S. Air Force Could Have Used Spy Shuttles to Monitor Bin Laden. While technically feasible, we may never know whether the U.S. used these pricey tech toys for surveillance.

In light of the UK newspaper Guardian's claims that the U.S. orchestrated an elaborate staged vaccination campaign to secretly collect the DNA of Osama Bin Laden's family members to verify his identity, one wonders what other lengths the U.S. government may have gone to in order to catch this terrorist who eluded the U.S. for nearly 10 years after the attacks of September 11. We already know that it used top-secret modified Black Hawk helicopters to avoid detection. So what other high tech devices might the U.S. military and intelligence community have deployed to aid the raid?

When speaking recently with a science-minded professional colleague, they raised the idea that the X-37B autonomous space plane could have been used to spy on Bin Laden. We found this idea fascinating so we wanted to dig into it further.

If you're a bit lost right now, here's the basics. In April 2010 the U.S. used an Atlas V rocket to launch a mini space shuttle designed by The Boeing Comp. (BA). This shuttle contained no human pilot - it was navigated by robotic brains, based on commands by ground operators. Between April and November the X-37B orbited the Earth in Low Earth Orbit (LEO), before successfully reentering the atmosphere and landing at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California.

A second X-37B was constructed in 2010. This vehicle was launched in March 2011 and presumably is still in orbit.

One pressing question on the minds of many is why the U.S. government gave the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and later the U.S. Air Force (USAF) the hundreds of millions in funding necessary to build the device. The Atlas V launches alone likely cost around $200M USD combined. [Read more: Mick/DailyTech/14July2011]

Why Pakistan Wants to Keep that $800 Million in Aid, After All. A day after Pakistani military officials shrugged off news that the US was cutting $800 million of aid for materiel and expelled military trainers, Pakistan's prime minister expresses 'concerns' and its spy chief visits Washington. 

In a timely coincidence, a US-sponsored production of Neil Simon's "Odd Couple" opened Tuesday in Islamabad, Pakistan. After the opening performance, US Ambassador Cameron Munter told the Pakistani press that, like the iconic Oscar and Felix, the US and Pakistan "can find a way to live together, to support each other, and to prosper."

He spoke amid signs that, despite perhaps the worst deterioration in a long-troubled relationship, the two countries may be taking a breath and pulling back from a bilateral split.

On Wednesday, the head of Pakistan's powerful spy agency, the Directorate of Inter-Services Intelligence (ISI) made a surprise visit to Washington.

And after Pakistan's earlier "who-needs-it" response to proposed steep cuts in US military aid, the country's prime minister, Yusuf Raza Gilani, changed the tune on Wednesday.

Expressing "concerns" about how the cuts would affect the country's fight with extremism, Mr. Gilani said, "It is our own war, but we are fighting this war for the entire world" - sounding a markedly different tone from military officials a day earlier.

On Tuesday, the country's defense minister, Ahmed Mukhtar, threatened to pull Pakistani forces out of the sensitive border region with Afghanistan if the US follows through on some $800 million in cuts to an annual $2 billion in military assistance.

So why did the ISI chief, Lieutenant-General Ahmed Shuja Pasha, make a one-day visit to Washington?

Probably because of the precipitous worsening in recent days of relations that were already souring after the US raid that killed Osama bin Laden on Pakistani territory, South Asia analysts say. But it would be a mistake to assume that the visit means both sides are ready to patch things up, they add. [Read more: LaFranchi/ChristianScienceMonitor/13July2011]

Living in Fear. The image of James Bond, flamboyant, flashy and with a licence to kill, is the bane of the intelligence world. The reality of the secret world is mundane. It involves the cumbersome process of intelligence gathering followed by the tedious task of sifting through an enormous mass of information and then analysing the relevant material as evidence to build up a case for action or policy-making. The running of agents, the garnering of information and analysis - all tasks performed at different levels by members of the intelligence community - demand slow-burning energies, not sudden spurts of dynamism. The aim of intelligence gathering and analysis of information is to provide vital inputs to the policy-makers. When the information and analysis are inadequate or when they falter, policy-making related to security inevitably suffers. This context is important to bear in mind now since Mumbai has once again been made the target of an attack. It is easy to say that there has been an intelligence failure, but such a catch-all statement conveys nothing. Where exactly is the failure located within the supply chain of intelligence gathering?

The issue is important because it is possible to drastically reduce, if not eradicate, the kind of attacks that Mumbai has been made to suffer. The United States of America and the United Kingdom have demonstrated how this can be achieved. In both the countries, there has been no recurrence of terrorist attacks after September 2001 in New York and July 2005 in London. The reason for this is not because terrorists no longer consider these worthy targets. On the contrary, the intelligence communities of these two countries, by keeping a few steps ahead of terrorists, pre-empt threats. [Read more: TelegraphIndia/16July2011]


Section IV - Books, Obituaries and Coming Events

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Books

'The Triple Agent' by Joby Warrick. In the afternoon of Dec. 30, 2009, a meek Jordanian doctor who had gained access to the top commanders of Al Qaeda was driven onto a secret CIA base at Khost in eastern Afghanistan for his first formal debriefing. More than a dozen CIA officers and other Americans stood in a receiving line to welcome the so-called "golden source." Camp cooks had even baked him a celebratory cake.

Until then, no American had ever met the star informant, and only a handful even knew his name: Humam al-Balawi.

But he was deemed so pivotal to America's war on Al Qaeda that back in Washington, President Obama had been notified and was awaiting news of the meeting.

Balawi instead detonated a powerful bomb sewn into his vest, shooting a shower of lethal shrapnel through metal and bone. The explosion killed seven CIA officers, a Jordanian intelligence officer who was a member of the royal family, a CIA-trained Afghan driver, and the suicide bomber himself. The CIA had not lost that many operatives in a single day since the bombing of the U.S. Embassy in Beirut in 1983, which killed eight CIA officers. [Read more:  Drogin/LATimes/16July2011] 

America the Vulnerable: Inside the New Threat Matrix of Digital Espionage, Crime, and Warfare, by Joel Brenner. A former top-level National Security Agency insider goes behind the headlines to explore America's next great battleground: digital security. An urgent wake-up call that identifies our foes; unveils their methods; and charts the dire consequences for government, business, and individuals.

Shortly after 9/11, Joel Brenner entered the inner sanctum of American espionage, first as the inspector general of the National Security Agency, then as the head of counterintelligence for the director of national intelligence. He saw at close range the battleground on which our adversaries are now attacking us-cyberspace. We are at the mercy of a new generation of spies who operate remotely from China, the Middle East, Russia, even France, among many other places. These operatives have already shown their ability to penetrate our power plants, steal our latest submarine technology, rob our banks, and invade the Pentagon's secret communications systems.

Incidents like the WikiLeaks posting of secret U.S. State Department cables hint at the urgency of this problem, but they hardly reveal its extent or its danger. Our government and corporations are a "glass house," all but transparent to our adversaries. Counterfeit computer chips have found their way into our fighter aircraft; the Chinese stole a new radar system that the navy spent billions to develop; our own soldiers used intentionally corrupted thumb drives to download classified intel from laptops in Iraq. And much more.

Dispatches from the corporate world are just as dire. In 2008, hackers lifted customer files from the Royal Bank of Scotland and used them to withdraw $9 million in half an hour from ATMs in the United States, Britain, and Canada. If that was a traditional heist, it would be counted as one of the largest in history. Worldwide, corporations lose on average $5 million worth of intellectual property apiece annually, and big companies lose many times that.

The structure and culture of the Internet favor spies over governments and corporations, and hackers over privacy, and we've done little to alter that balance. Brenner draws on his extraordinary background to show how to right this imbalance and bring to cyberspace the freedom, accountability, and security we expect elsewhere in our lives.

In America the Vulnerable, Brenner offers a chilling and revelatory appraisal of the new faces of war and espionage-virtual battles with dangerous implications for government, business, and all of us. [Read more: PenguinPress/July2011]


Obituaries

Mary-Paget S. Langalis. Longtime Falls Church City resident Mary-Paget S. Langalis, 81, died at home July 10, ending a 15-month battle with pancreatic cancer.

She was born July 9, 1930, at Hagerstown, Maryland, eldest of three children of the late Dr. Walter H. and Anne Marie Shealy of Sharpsburg, Maryland, where she grew up. She attended Washington County public schools and graduated from Wilson College in 1951 with a B.A. in music (piano).

She joined the Central Intelligence Agency in Washington, D.C., in 1951. Under CIA auspices, she learned Hindi at the Georgetown University Institute of Languages and Linguistics, and later learned Russian as well. In the mid-1950s she changed career tracks, from translator/analyst to reports officer in the Clandestine Services directorate. She left the agency in 1958 to accompany her husband overseas. [Read more:  Starr/FCNP/14July2011] 

Wanda Shaver vanVliet. Wanda Shaver vanVliet, 94, a CIA employee who did administrative work for more than 25 years, died June 29 of metastatic cancer at the Methodist Home in Washington.

She was a native of Fairmont, W.Va., and a 1939 education graduate of what is now Fairmont State University.

During World War II, she served in India with the Office of Strategic Services, the wartime forerunner of the CIA. She served with the CIA in England, Iran, Guyana and Sweden before retiring in 1972.

She was a member of the Daughters of the American Revolution and served a three-year term as a DAR chapter regent. She was a member of the Metropolitan Memorial United Methodist Church of Washington and served as treasurer of an AARP chapter in the District.

She had no immediate survivors. [Read more: Brown/WashingtonPost/13July2011]


Coming Educational Events

EDUCATIONAL EVENTS IN COMING TWO MONTHS....

MANY Spy Museum Events in July, August, and September with full details are listed on the AFIO Website at www.afio.com. The titles for some of these are in detail below and online.

Tuesday, 19 July 2011, 7 - 9pm - Washington, DC - "The Lincoln Assassination Conspiracies " - Spy Seminar Series on Civil War Spies at the International Spy Museum

Spy Seminar Series: Civil War Spies - A Three-Part Exploration of Union and Confederate Intelligence Operations.
The North and the South both had their share of intelligence successes (and failures); neither the Blue nor the Gray were strangers to intrigue and espionage. Society ladies carried secret messages, runaway slaves re-crossed the Mason-Dixon Line as undercover agents, and couriers worked covert operations in the life or death climate of wartime. In this series, a distinguished group of historians and espionage experts will introduce you to some of the most amazing spies and spy cases of the conflict.
Location: Ford's Theatre - Join renowned experts Michael Kauffman, author of American Brutus; Frank J. Williams, Chairman of The Lincoln Forum and Chief Justice (ret) of Rhode Island; and H. Donald Winkler, author of Stealing Secrets and Lincoln and Booth: More Light on the Conspiracy; for a rounded view of the conspiracies and realities of the horrific events of April 14th, 1865.
International Spy Museum: 800 F Street, NW Washington, DC. Gallery Place/Chinatown Metrorail Station
Tickets: Series Tickets: $60; Individual Tickets: $25
Register at: www.spymuseum.org

Wednesday, 20 July 2011, 12 noon - Washington, DC - "The Triple Agent: The Al Qaeda Mole Who Infiltrated the CIA" a book event at the International Spy Museum

For more than a decade, the United States has been hunting Ayman al-Zawahiri, the number two man in Al Qaeda. In 2009, the Agency was finally getting close to bagging this "High-Value Target"—its partners in the Jordanian General Intelligence Directorate had a source named Humam Khalil al-Balawi working inside Al Qaeda and he knew where Zawahiri was. Or so Jordanian intelligence and the CIA thought. In fact, Al Qaeda was running a sophisticated deception against them. In December 2009 al-Balawi came to Forward Operating Base Chapman, a CIA base in Khost, Afghanistan and detonated a thirty-pound bomb strapped to his chest, instantly killing seven CIA officers and one Jordanian intelligence officer. It was the CIA's greatest loss of life in decades. In The Triple Agent, Pulitzer Prize winning journalist Joby Warrick takes us deep inside the CIA's secret war against Al Qaeda, a war that pits robotic planes and laser-guided missiles against a low-tech but cunning enemy. Join the author for this gripping true story of miscalculation, deception, and revenge, learn how Al Qaeda fooled the world's greatest intelligence service.
Tickets: Free! No Registration Required!

Thursday, 21 July 2011, 12:30 - 2:30 - Los Angeles, CA - The AFIO LA Chapter hears anti-terrorism specialist Michael O'Neill on Irish, European, and pan-Arab 21st Century Terrorism

Event is being held at the LMU campus. Speaker Michael O'Neill is a former detective with the Royal Ulster Constabulary Anti-Terrorism Division, and will discuss his personal perspective of "terror" in the 21st Century with relation to the "Irish" question and the links between the European and pan Arab entities similar to the PLO. Please RSVP via email to AFIO_LA@yahoo.com if you plan to attend the luncheon.

Thursday, 21 July 2011, 11:30 am - Colorado Springs, CO – The Rocky Mountain Chapter presents Joan Papke an Attorney and Private Investigator on Using Social Network and Social Media as an Intelligence Tool.

Attorney Papke will also discuss the potential legal and ethical issues associated with using social media and social networking sites in the course of an investigation or as a tool for gathering Intelligence. This event will be held at a new location The Inn at Palmer Divide, 443 S. Highway 105 Palmer Lake, CO, Exit 161 westbound off I-25, West on Highway 105. Please RSVP to Tom VanWormer at robsmom@pcisys.net

24 July 2011, 11:30 am - Cleveland, OH - "Indentification, Assessment, Monitoring and Minimizing of Risk at the Local Level" at AFIO N Ohio Chapter hosts Patrick Shaw, Dept of Homeland Security

Speaker: Patrick M. Shaw -- Protective Security Advisor (PSA). Shaw is Protective Security Advisor (PSA) for the Cleveland, Ohio District, Department of Homeland Security
Topic: Identification, Assessment, Monitoring and Minimizing of Risk at the Local Level

WHERE: Cleveland Yachting Club, 200 Yacht Club Dr., Cleveland, OH 44116-1736, (440) 333-1155
Get directions: Near Clifton Blvd. and Lake Road in Rocky River. Click on "Get directions, above, for Google Map directions from your point of origin.

COST: Chapter and AFIO National Members and their guests $28.00; National AFIO Members and their guests $30.00; Non-Members $35.00

RSVP: Email to mgoldstein@msglpa.com or phone the names of those attending to 440-424-4071
RSVP's will be considered firm. Then mail check with reservation form, to be received by July 15, 2011

Patrick M. (Pat) Shaw currently serves as the Protective Security Advisor (PSA) for the DHS Cleveland, Ohio District. Mr. Shaw supports homeland security efforts, serving in an advising and reach-back capacity to the Homeland Security Advisors. He contributes to the development of the national risk picture by assisting with the identification, assessment, monitoring, and minimizing of risk to critical assets at the local level. As a PSA, Mr. Shaw facilitates, coordinates, and performs vulnerability assessments for local infrastructure and assets, and acts as a physical and technical advisor to Federal, state, and local law enforcement agencies.

Tuesday, 26 July 2011, 7 - 9pm - Washington, DC - " Civil War Sisterhood of Spies" - Spy Seminar Series on Civil War Spies at the International Spy Museum
Spy Seminar Series: Civil War Spies - A Three-Part Exploration of Union and Confederate Intelligence Operations.
The North and the South both had their share of intelligence successes (and failures); neither the Blue nor the Gray were strangers to intrigue and espionage. Society ladies carried secret messages, runaway slaves re-crossed the Mason-Dixon Line as undercover agents, and couriers worked covert operations in the life or death climate of wartime. In this series, a distinguished group of historians and espionage experts will introduce you to some of the most amazing spies and spy cases of the conflict.
Location: the Willard Intercontinental Hotel - Ann Blackman author of Wild Rose will describe Wild Rose Greenhow's exploits in the nation's capitol, Amanda Ohlke, director of adult education at the International Spy Museum will trace Elizabeth Van Lew's colorful espionage career, and historical impersonator Emily Lapisardi will portray lively Confederate spy Antonia Ford.
International Spy Museum: 800 F Street, NW Washington, DC. Gallery Place/Chinatown Metrorail Station
Tickets: Series Tickets: $60; Individual Tickets: $25
Register at: www.spymuseum.org

4 August 2011 - San Francisco, CA - The AFIO Jim Quesada Chapter hosts Akiva Tor, Consul General of Israel for the Pacific Northwest Region.

The topic will be on the evolving unrest in the Middle East to include events that started in Tunisia, moved to Egypt, Libya, Yemen and more recently Syria and the resulting ramifications regarding the security of Israel. The presentation will touch on cooperation between US and Israeli intelligence. The meeting location will be confirmed upon receipt of registration. 11:30AM no host cocktails; noon - luncheon. $25 member rate with advance reservation and payment; $35 non-members accompanied by a member. No walk-ins allowed. Seating is limited. E-mail RSVP to Mariko Kawaguchi (please indicate meat or fish) at afiosf@aol.com and mail a check made out to "AFIO" by 7/27/11 to: Mariko Kawaguchi, P.O. Box 117578, Burlingame, CA 94011

Saturday, 6 August 2011, 11:30 am -- Melbourne, FL -- the AFIO Satellite Chapter luncheon followed by General Bud O'Connor's talk, "To the Moon." 

This luncheon will be held at the At Ease Club in the Indian River Colony Club, Melbourne, FL.  Check-in and cash bar at 11:30 am, lunch ($18) at 12:30 pm, followed by speaker. To register or for more information, contact Donna Czarnecki at donnacz@aol.com

Saturday, 6 August 2011, 7:00 pm - Washington, DC - "The ESP in Espionage: An Evening with Alain Nu, the Man Who Knows" at the International Spy Museum

“To watch him is to throw out all the rules of physics. Time and space are malleable in Nu's deft hands.” — Eric Brace, The Washington Post

When the U.S. Government began their Star Gate program in the 1970s, they were focused on the possibility of using psychic channels to gather intelligence. Psychics, in a clinically controlled setting, were asked to perform “remote viewing”—attempting to sense targeted information about people, places and events. Reports of the program’s success run from the eerie to the off-base, but the intelligence world’s pursuit of the mind’s power has captured the imagination of Alain Nu. The Man Who Knows™, who has long been obsessed with the strange, the unknown, and unexplained. His exploration of the unusual has led him to the field of mentalism and developing his untold powers. Nu’s uncanny demonstrations blur the line between science and the mysteries of unexplained phenomena and have been featured in his own TLC Network television specials The Mysterious World of Alain Nu and his book Picture Your ESP! And now he is turning his ESPecially entertaining powers to the world of ESPionage. Join us for an evening with Nu inspired by Star Gate, the trickery of spies, and other top secret projects.

Tickets:  $25 – Complimentary light hors d’oeuvres and a cash bar. To register visit www.spymuseum.org

Tuesday, 9 August 2011 - Tampa, FL - The AFIO Suncoast FL Chapter features Hon. Gus M. Bilirakis, Republican from Palm Harbor.

Gus Bilirakis was first elected to Congress on November 7, 2006, to represent Florida's Ninth Congressional District, which includes portions of Pasco, Pinellas, and Hillsborough counties. He is currently serving his third term in the United States House of Representatives. Gus currently serves on the Committees on Homeland Security, Veterans' Affairs and Foreign Affairs. Gus has been appointed Chairman of the Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, Response and
Communication, a vital post for the state of Florida. In this role he will oversee the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), and will work to enhance emergency preparedness across the nation. He has also been named Vice Chairman of the Veteran's Affairs Committee, where he will advocate for veterans and oversee the Department of Veterans Affairs. Additionally, Gus is a member of the Republican Party's Whip Team, is Chair of the Veterans' Affairs Task Force for the Republican Policy Committee, and is Co-Chairman of the Military Veterans Caucus.
Please RSVP no later than August 5th with the names of any guests. Refer to the information "To attend our Meeting" in the chapter newsletter for important details. Check-in at 1130 hours; opening ceremonies, lunch and business meeting at noon, followed by our speaker, the Hon. Gus Bilirakis. We have maintained the all-inclusive cost at $15. The cash wine and soda bar will open at 1100 hours for those that wish to come early to socialize. Further info at www.suncoastafio.org or contact Wallace S. Bruschweiler, Sr. at afiosuncoastvp@aol.com

Friday, 12 August 2011 - McLean, VA - AFIO National Summer Luncheon features Michael Rogers, the Chairman of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence

REGISTER NOW for the AFIO National Summer Luncheon. MORNING speaker [11 a.m.] will be the Chairman of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence Rep. Michael J. Rogers (R-MI 8th District) former FBI Remarks are ON THE RECORD. The 1 p.m. speaker T.B.D. Check in for badge pickup at 10:30 a.m. Chairman Mike Rogers gives address at 11 a.m. Afternoon Speaker [T.B.D.] will give address at 1 p.m. Lunch is served at noon. Event closes at 2 p.m. -- EVENT LOCATION: The Crowne Plaza 1960 Chain Bridge Road • McLean, Virginia 22102 Driving directions here or use this link: http://tinyurl.com/8228kw Register HERE To Be Certain of Space

13 August 2011 - Orange Park / Gainesville, FL - The AFIO North Florida Chapter meets at the Country Club to hear Colonel Will G. Merrill, Jr., U.S. Army (Retired), USMA graduate.

This meeting’s special guest and speaker will be Colonel Will G. Merrill, Jr., U.S. Army (Retired). A native of Ashland, Wisconsin, he graduated from the United States Military Academy at West Point in the Class of 1958. After graduation, he was assigned as a platoon leader with the 82nd Airborne Division at Fort Bragg, NC from 1959 to 1961. Following that assignment, he commanded a Hawk surface-to-air missile battery at Fort Bliss, TX and Bad Aibling, Germany from 1961- 64. In 1966-67, he was an advisor to a Vietnamese Army 155 mm Artillery Battalion in Pleiku, Vietnam. During 1969-70, he served as Operations Officer for the 2nd Infantry Division on the Demilitarized Zone in the Republic of Korea during a period of intense crisis. From 1974-75 he was Battalion Commander of the 1/7th Air Defense Artillery at Fort Bliss, TX. From 1983-1989 he was the NATO Liaison Officer to Greece, stationed at the Greek Pentagon in Athens, during which time he narrowly escaped two assassination plots. He retired from the U.S. Army with the rank of Colonel in 1989. He is a graduate of the Artillery Officer Basic and Advanced Courses, the Army Ranger Course, the Army Airborne Course, the Armed Forces Staff College and the DOD Language School courses in Spanish and Greek. He has also earned a Master’s Degree in Business from Webster College. Following his retirement from military service he became Vice President of a nationwide Home Inspection Service and later Vice President of a Wireless Communications Company. His personal decorations include the Department of Defense Superior Service Award, Legion of Merit, Bronze Star Medal, Four Meritorious Service Medals, Army Commendation Medal and Vietnamese Honor Medal. His sons Bill and Michael are also West Point graduates. Bill, also an Army Colonel, has completed two tours of duty in Iraq and extensive duty in other Mid-East countries. His granddaughter, Jeanell, is an Army 1st Lieutenant who has also served in Iraq. Will is married to the former Barbara Michel, of Brooklyn, New York. His daughters Mary Merrill Quinn and Susan Tsantes, live in Minneapolis and Framingham, MA. His son, Michael, lives in Jacksonville and is the founder of Smartphones Technologies. He will be speaking about his many and diverse Army experiences, and has recently authored a book on the Heros of 9/11.
Please RSVP right away for the 13 August 2011 meeting to Quiel at qbegonia@comcast.net or 904-545-9549.The cost will be $16 each, pay the Country Club at the event.

24 - 26 August 2011 - Raleigh, NC - "Spies Among Us - The Secret World of Illegals" - theme of the 7th Raleigh Spy Conference

Special guests/speakers: Michael Hayden, former DCIA and DIRNSA; Michael Sulick, former Director of the National Clandestine Service, CiA
Returning presenters:
Brian Kelley
, CIA & Professor at Institute of World Politics;
Nigel West - world-famous intelligence author/speaker - former Member of Parliament;
Dan Mulvenna - RCMP/CASIS
Writer's Roundtable to feature Douglas Waller, author of Wild Bill Donovan, about the founder of the Office of Strategic Services — the World War 11 forerunner of the CIA — will serve as anchor. Other authors on the roundtable are David Wise, often called 'the dean of intelligence authors,' to discuss his new book Tiger Trap: America’s Secret Spy War With America, and Kent Clizbe, author of Willing Accomplices, a book concerning the continuing influence of Soviet propaganda on Western academia and media and other noted writers in the field.

New to the conference this year: The Historical Collections Division of the Office of Information Services of the Central Intelligence Agency will present a few booklets of recently declassified secret documents, ranging from the Korean War, the Warsaw Pact, Air America, martial law in Poland, the Soviet invasion of Czechoslovakia, and the papers of controversial CIA director Richard Helms. Officials from CIA’s Historical Division will be on hand in Raleigh to discuss their work and answer individual questions.

For more information: www.raleighspyconference.com
email: cyndi@metromagazine.com
Location: North Carolina Museum of History, Downtown Raleigh, NC

12 September 2011 - Washington, DC - DACOR-DIAA Forum hosts speaker on Islamic Doctrine of Shariah.

LTG Harry E. Soyster, USA (Ret.) and John Guandolo will speak on the Islamic Doctrine of Shariah. The speakers were on the team that wrote Shariah: The Threat to America. General Soyster was a director of the Defense Intelligence Agency and INSCOM CG. John Guandolo advises internationally on the Global Islamic Movement and created the FBI Counterterrorism Training and Education Course. This Forum will be open to members of all Intelligence Community associations and their guests.
Location: DACOR Bacon House, downtown Washington, DC
AFIO will announce time and full address in a week or two. It will provide registration details as well.


For Additional Events two+ months or greater....view our online Calendar of Events

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