AFIO Weekly Intelligence Notes #16-12 dated 24 April 2012

[Editors' Note: The WIN editors attempt to include a wide range of articles and commentary in the Weekly Notes to inform and educate our readers. However, the views expressed in the articles are purely those of the authors, and in no way reflect support or endorsement from the WIN editors or the AFIO officers and staff. We welcome comments from the WIN readers on any and all articles and commentary.]
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CONTENTS

Section I - INTELLIGENCE HIGHLIGHTS

Section II - CONTEXT & PRECEDENCE

Section III - COMMENTARY

Section IV -   Jobs, Author Inquiries, Books, Documentaries, and Coming Events

Coming Educational Events

Current Calendar New and/or Next Two Months ONLY

HOLD THE DATE FOR SPECIAL EVENT

Friday, June 1, Tysons Corner, VA
AFIO Summer Luncheon
featuring former CIA National Clandestine Service Director
Jose A. Rodriguez, Jr.

on his long-anticipated book:

HARD MEASURES:
How Aggressive CIA Actions After 9/11
Saved American Lives

co-authored with Bill Harlow
[author, former Director of the Office of Public Affairs, CIA] .

Registration for this special luncheon begins next week.
Morning speaker TBA.


Teach Online Homeland Security Course

AMERICAN MILITARY UNIVERSITY / American Public University System

Online Adjunct Faculty Position Available
Homeland Security

Synopsis of Role: Adjunct and full-time teaching faculty share our commitment to learning, teaching, interaction with students and faculty, service to our communities of practice, and scholarship. They are united by the common goal of inspiring academic excellence in students with a broad range of interests and experiences consistent with the Community of Inquiry Framework as adopted by APUS for cognitive presence, teaching presence, and social presence. They are key to creating a rewarding online learning experience for students by engaging them, challenging them, and supporting them. They contribute to and participate in a range of activities related to effectiveness and excellence in teaching and student retention. Faculty members remain aware of discipline content intent for the courses they teach. They follow APUS guidelines, processes, and methods and are responsive to mentoring and coaching.

Required Experience:  • Ph.D. or Juris Doctorate from a regionally accredited institution is required. • Proficient in Microsoft Office Suite programs required. • Record of excellence in teaching. • College-level teaching experience is required. • Online teaching experience is preferred. 

Required Areas of Expertise or Experience (at least one): • Counterterrorism • Immigration Enforcement • Immigration Services • Homeland Security Law • Domestic Radicalization • Weapons of Mass Destruction • Risk Analysis / Threat Analysis • Critical Infrastructure Protection • Law Enforcement • Cyber Information Security.

Academic Responsibilities and Essential Functions: • Teaching excellence ◦ Deliver online lessons to undergraduate and/or graduate students. ◦ Initiate, facilitate, interact and moderate online classroom forums. ◦ Be a faculty leader in your classes embracing fully the Community of Inquiry Framework of Teaching Presence, Cognitive Presence, and Social Presence. ◦ Evaluate and grade students' class work, assignments, and papers within the timeframe set forth by APUS policy providing effective feedback to guide student learning and success. ◦ Comply with APUS guidelines and expectations for quality faculty engagement online. ◦ Engage in the classroom and reply to emails, etc. at least every other day, including one day during the weekend. ◦ Remain aware of classroom procedures and use of instructional materials. ◦ Participate in professional development to enhance teaching skills. • Attend discipline specific and administrative meetings as scheduled. • Maintain 'discipline' knowledge by participating in one's own discipline-related professional communities. • Support APUS initiatives and departments.

Job Location: Remote/Online

Position Type: Part-Time

Work Environment and Physical Demands: This is a remote position. Candidates will need to supply their own office equipment and internet connection.

To Apply: https://apus.silkroad.com/epostings/index.cfm?version=1&company_id=16175
Questions? Email aclayton@apus.edu


SPYPEDIA Subscriber?
If so, these are the latest updates. If not, here is just a bit of what you're missing....

SPYPEDIA updates as of 19 April: An international espionage case broke last week when on 12 April Danish officials made public the arrest of Timo Kivimaki, a Professor at the University of Copenhagen who allegedly supplied the Russian SVR with the names of potential recruits among his students. He is the first person to be tried under the Danish law that prohibits "assisting spies of a foreign power on Danish soil."Additionally, in Taiwan on 16 April, Tsai Kuo-hsien, an intelligence agent at Taiwan's National Security Bureau, was indicted for providing classified national security information to China.
In international terrorism, we have a new profile for Anders Breivik, Norway's worst terrorist, currently on trial for opening fire on a political youth group and setting off a bomb in Oslo last year, killing a total of 77, as well as for Sheikh Abu Hamza Al-Masri, a radical British cleric who is soon to be extradited to the United States for his involvement in terrorist activities, including the December 1998 kidnapping of tourists in Yemen. The UK is also attempting to deport, with difficulty, Abu Qatada, another radical cleric who has been an influential voice inspiring and funding terrorism around the world.

All new additions can be found by simply navigating to the "New Content" tab, which features the most recent updates in the SPYPEDIA database.

-Centre for Counterintelligence and Security Studies (CI Centre)


College Costs Giving You Sticker-Shock?

An intelligence education can be costly,
but it's an important investment in your -- and your country's -- future.

Let AFIO help you -- or your children -- with the fees
of an intelligence career-oriented field of study.
We have generous scholarships for undergraduate or graduate school students. Applicants can do the entire, brief application online - once - to be considered for all available AFIO scholarships.
Do not delay.
The deadline is midnight, Sunday, July 1, 2012.

Explore scholarship options here and apply.

Note: Deadline is midnight SUNDAY, July 1.

 

Section I - INTELLIGENCE HIGHLIGHTS

Alan Turing Papers on Code Breaking Released by GCHQ. Two 70-year-old papers by Alan Turing on the theory of code breaking have been released by the government's communications headquarters, GCHQ.

It is believed Turing wrote the papers while at Bletchley Park working on breaking German Enigma codes.

A GCHQ mathematician said the fact that the contents had been restricted "shows what a tremendous importance it has in the foundations of our subject".

It comes amid celebrations to mark the centenary of Turing's birth.

The two papers are now available to view at the National Archives at Kew, west London.

GCHQ was able to approximately date the papers because in one example Turing had made reference to Hitler's age. [Read more: Vallance/BBC/19April2012]

Judge Rules on Profits From C.I.A. Book. A federal judge has ruled that a former clandestine case officer for the Central Intelligence Agency will have to forfeit any future money he earns from a book he wrote about the C.I.A. that was published without the agency's permission. The C.I.A. says the former employee, writing under the pseudonym Ishmael Jones, submitted the book to the agency's publications review board as required but published the book, "The Human Factor: Inside the CIA's Dysfunctional Intelligence Culture," before the review was done. After the ruling Thursday by Judge Gerald Bruce Lee of Federal District Court in Alexandria, Va., Mr. Jones, who has not disclosed his real identity, said he put the profits in accounts belonging to children of American soldiers killed in action. [AP/20April2012]

Pentagon Pushes For Greater Spy Powers; Wants To Run Businesses, Like CIA. On a train somewhere on the east coast:: Imagine a soldier, wearing mufti, traveling through Syria in a rattletrap taxi. He's a spy, dressed in a suit, going to meet an agent who says he can offer rebels the Syrian government's order of battle.

The soldier, an Army intelligence officer fluent in Syrian and Iraqi Arabic, has spent 18 months cultivating the source, a senior official in the telecommunications company owned by the brother of Syria's president. The son of a general, the agent has grown disillusioned by two years of civil war and wants to help end his country's agony. His information could help the rebels break the regime's back.

That's the kind of operation the Pentagon hopes its agent might be able to execute if they are given authority they've requested from Congress. It would substantially increase the Defense Intelligence Agency's authority to build covers, create businesses and to run them for long periods.

"Expansion of this authority is necessary to permit DOD to conduct revenue-generating commercial activities to protect such operations and would provide an important safeguard for U.S. military forces conducting hazardous operations abroad," the request for legislation says. 

But a former senior intelligence official with years of experience handling a wide array of covert operations is skeptical that DIA, which has never run such operations before, will be able to pull this off. [Read more: Clark/AOLDefense/20April2012]

Spy Agency's Cyber Contest Won by U.S. Air Force Academy. Undergraduates at the U.S. Air Force Academy won an annual cyber defense contest run by the National Security Agency to promote skills in protecting electronic networks.

A team of Air Force cadets beat their Army, Navy and Coast Guard counterparts in four days of exercises staged by the NSA, which is responsible for code-breaking and electronic surveillance, the Fort Meade, Maryland-based agency said today.

For students at the academies, where the curriculum includes the study of ancient war strategies, the annual contest helps challenge the next generation of military leaders to defend computer networks from cyber attacks, which Defense Secretary Leon Panetta has called the "weapon of the future."

"The folks who're going to be the future commanders will have a cyber appreciation and awareness that is very important to us," Tony Sager, chief operating officer at the NSA's Information Assurance Directorate told reporters yesterday.

Younger military officers who grew up with Facebook, Twitter and the Internet expect to be connected "with everyone on Earth all the time are much more comfortable with technology," Sager said. They also understand vulnerabilities of networks better than "senior military folks who struggle to understand the problem," said Sager who created the contest in 2000.

Cadets from the Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs, Colorado, were ranked best at defending their network from a series of cyber attacks in the 12th annual contest, Vanee Vines, an agency spokeswoman said today. It was the third win for the Air Force students. The U.S. Military Academy at West Point, New York, won the contest six times, including last year. The U.S. Naval Academy has won twice and the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy has won once. [Read more: Ratnam/Bloomberg/20April2012]

China Denies U.S. Espionage Accusation. Chinese officials have denied U.S. accusations that China's progress in space exploration is partly owed to espionage.

A report Wednesday by the U.S. Defense and State departments recommended loosening U.S. export controls on items used to build satellites and other relevant equipment but suggested maintaining or tightening controls on exports to particular countries such as China and Iran, and accused China of stealing space technology.

"China deeply regrets the relevant report from the U.S. administration, and is firmly against the groundless accusation made against China," Foreign Ministry spokesman Liu Weimin told China's state-run news agency Xinhua.

"The report mistakenly insisted on the two-decade-old satellite export restrictions against China, which was against the consensus reached between the two heads of state on enhancing space cooperation," Liu said. [Read more: UPI/20April2012]

Eritrea Blames CIA for Rumours of President's Ill Health. The Eritrean government on Monday dismissed allegations that its president, Isaias Afewerki, is fatally ill; claiming it is a smear campaign orchestrated by the US Central Intelligence Agency (CIA).

Recently Eritrean opposition groups have been alleging that the former rebel leader's health has deteriorated due liver disease and has sought medical treatment in Qatar.

However, in a statement released on Monday, the Eritrean ministry of information said the president is "in robust health, and by all means of medical standard, he is at the peak of his health."

Eritrea accused the CIA of being the "rumour monger" which fomented the allegation. [Read more: Tekle/SudanTribune/23April2012]

Al Qaeda Challenges with Lone Wolf Tactics: Canada. Al Qaeda's new focus on "lone wolf" tactics is making it tough for Western intelligence agencies to prevent terror attacks, the head of Canada's spy service said on Monday.

In a rare admission that al Qaeda's switch to "individual jihad" was posing problems, the head of Canada's spy service said lone wolves are tough to detect because they do not belong to a larger network that might attract attention.

"When you have an individual who doesn't talk to anyone, you either need good luck - which happens sometimes - or for them to make a little mistake here and there," Richard Fadden, head of the Canadian Security Intelligence Service, told the Canadian Senate's anti-terrorism committee.

He said al Qaeda had decided to urge solo campaigns because it was too difficult to launch major operations such as the 9/11 terror attacks in the United States. [Read more: Ljunggren/Reuters/23April2012]

Pentagon Establishes Defense Clandestine Service, New Espionage Unit. The Pentagon is planning to ramp up its spying operations against high-priority targets such as Iran under an intelligence reorganization aimed at expanding on the military's espionage efforts beyond war zones, a senior defense official said Monday.

The newly created Defense Clandestine Service would work closely with the CIA - pairing two organizations that have often seen each other as rivals - in an effort to bolster espionage operations overseas at a time when the missions of the agency and the military increasingly converge.

The plan, the official said, was developed in response to a classified study completed last year by the director of national intelligence that concluded that the military's espionage efforts needed to be more focused on major targets beyond the tactical considerations of Iraq and Afghanistan.

The new service will seek to "make sure officers are in the right locations to pursue those requirements," said the official, who spoke on the condition of anonymity to describe the "realignment" of the military's classified human espionage efforts.

The official declined to provide details on where such shifts might occur, but the nation's most pressing intelligence priorities in recent years have included counter­terrorism, nonproliferation and ascendant powers such as China.

Creation of the new service also coincides with the appointment of a number of senior officials at the Pentagon who have extensive backgrounds in intelligence and firm opinions on where the military's spying programs - often seen as lackluster by CIA insiders - have gone wrong. [Read more: Miller/WashingtonPost/23April2012]

Ex-Chief: CIA Investigation Could Be Construed as Anti-Semitic. Former CIA director George Tenet has acknowledged that elements of the counterintelligence investigation against a former Jewish attorney at the agency in the 1990s could be construed as anti-Semitic.

Tenet acknowledged this in a previously undisclosed sworn deposition, part of a privacy act lawsuit filed by the former attorney, Adam Ciralsky. In 1999, Ciralsky's security clearance was revoked because of his alleged lack of candor about contact with Israelis and Israeli-Americans, effectively ending his brief career with the CIA. For the last dozen years Ciralsky has sued the CIA to bring to light how he believes a few agency officials - motivated by anti-Semitism - targeted him unfairly. On Friday he dropped his case.

"I am proud of my service with the CIA and have a deep and abiding respect for the organization and its mission," Ciralsky said in a statement. "I am equally proud that by highlighting and confronting the misconduct of a few, I spurred positive change."

While Tenet acknowledged in a 1999 letter to the Anti-Defamation League that some of the conduct of CIA investigators in the Ciralsky case was inappropriate, Tenet goes further and into more detail in the new deposition. Tenet authorized sensitivity training for the CIA on anti-Semitism following allegations of misconduct in the Ciralsky investigation. At the time the CIA said Ciralsky's dismissal was not the result of anti-Jewish prejudice.

According to the transcript of a 2010 deposition viewed exclusively by The Daily Beast, Tenet said statements attributed to an officer who administered a polygraph to Ciralsky were "insensitive, inappropriate and unprofessional" - and could be construed as anti-Semitic. [Read more: Lake/DailyBeast/23April2012]

Afghanistan's Spy Agency Says It Thwarted 2 Attacks. Afghanistan's intelligence agency, which has come under fire from Afghans for failing to detect multiple attacks here last weekend, said Saturday that it had apprehended militants plotting to kill one of the country's vice presidents and another group smuggling tons of explosives into the capital hidden in a truck of potatoes. 

In both plots the evidence pointed toward planners in Pakistan, the agency said, and in the case of the plan to assassinate Karim Khalili, the country's second vice president, the would-be attackers were linked to the Haqqani network, a Pakistan-based criminal network, according to their own confessions.

The announcement of the arrests appeared to be aimed in part at quelling criticism of the intelligence service, the National Directorate of Security, and at reminding the public of how many attacks are prevented by intelligence agents. The announcement came just as the Taliban released compelling video of participants in last Sunday's attacks taking their suicide pledges and the training camps where the Taliban claimed that the attackers were prepared for the missions. [Read more: Rubin/NYTimes/21April2012]

Who Voted Against Restricting Sales of Spy Tech to Dictators? These European Politicians. A Bulgarian taekwondo champion, two Portuguese Communists, and a British earl were among the odd group of European politicians who yesterday voted against a move to restrict the export of spy gear and censorship tools to autocratic regimes.

A resolution in the European Parliament calling for stricter oversight of companies selling equipment to countries such as Syria or China was passed overwhelmingly on Wednesday, with 580 votes for, 28 against, and 74 abstentions. The idea is to keep European companies from being complicit in human rights violations.

Now that it has been passed by a majority of members - who vote as individuals representing a political party, not a country - the resolution will be considered by the European Commission, the EU's executive body, which has been asked to put forward a proposal for legislation by 2013. 

So who would vote against to a proposal that seems so unobjectionable? The list showing which way the MEPs voted reveals that eight British politicians went against the resolution, along with five from Poland; three from the Czech Republic; two from Portugal, the Netherlands, Malta, and Germany; and one each from France, Italy, Austria, and Bulgaria. [Read more: Gallagher/Slate/19April/2012]

Forbes Bill Calls for More US Intel, Military Assets Against China. U.S. defense and intelligence institutions must step up their efforts against China as the Asian powerhouse continues to flex its military might in the Pacific. 

The Pentagon and intelligence community need to ramp up "unambiguous defense and intelligence capabilities" into the Pacific, according to new legislation introduced Wednesday by Rep. Randy Forbes (R-Va.) 

The Virginia Republican is a member of the House Armed Services Committee and chairs the committee's readiness subpanel. 

Those additional capabilities will allow the U.S. to "resist any resort to force or other forms of coercion" increasingly coming from Beijing against America and its allies in the region, according to the bill. [Read more: Munoz/TheHill/18April2012]


Section II - CONTEXT & PRECEDENCE

Westminster Alum, CIA Analyst Inspires Students 'To Live a Life of Intelligence'. When Jefferson City native Heather Triplett Biehl graduated from Westminster College in 1989, she probably didn't know that she would spend the next two decades working for the CIA, analyzing intelligence in Eastern Europe and the Middle East.

But the WMC alum did just that, and when she was asked to be the keynote speaker at Thursday's annual Westminster College Undergraduate Scholars Forum, a comprehensive program during which students present research they've gathered over the course of their studies, she drew from her experiences to encourage students to achieve greatness without compromising their personal morals.

Biehl took the stage 9 a.m. in Champ Auditorium, after a brief introduction from WMC Dean of Faculty Carolyn Perry, where Biehl told a packed auditorium of undergraduate students about her days as an analyst for the CIA. Biehl said she believes that what she learned there was applicable to just about anyone.

"To live a life of intelligence, one must find and practice their passion, understand the needs and skills of others, and work harder than you'd ever imagine," said Biehl.

Biehl had three key points for her listeners, with the first being that "you can be the expert." She learned this from her first post as a CIA analyst in 1990 Romania, shortly after the fall of prolific Communist dictator Nicolae Ceausescu. She was only 23 and had never filed an intelligence report, but after her supervisor had a personal emergency, Biehl found herself responsible for making the call whether Romania's first elections in the new regime were truly free and fair by U.S. standards. She ultimately determined they were not - but other people in the agency hadn't come to the same conclusion. After she was able to present her evidence, she changed their minds.

"Hard work and preparation is all any expert really is," Biehl said, recalling the words of John Fox, a State Department official at the time. [Read more: Asher/TheFultonSun/20April2012]

This Is the Portrait (And Story) of French Spy Chevalier d'Eon. The portrait isn't just any old vintage picture. Recently sold at auction in New York City as a painting of "a woman in a feathered hat," it's actually thought to be the first known formal portrait of a transvestite, the spy Chevalier d'Eon. The subject of this portrait is definitely a man, even though he lived the latter part of his life as a woman. And did I mention he was a spy, too? No really, kids, let's find out more about the Chevalier d'Eon.

First of all, no, this is not actually related to the manga or anime series Le Chavealier D'Eon, which was about a knight in service of King Louis XV looking for clues about the death of his sister. The real Chevalier was a man who spent the first 49 years of his life as a man and the last 33 as a woman. Though the choice may not have been entirely d'Eon's own personal preference. In 1763, after being appointed to Le Secret du Roi, the secret network of spies who worked for King Louis XV (the same from the anime/manga), he was named Plenipotentiary Minister to London. However, someone was gunning to replace him, and d'Eon ended up demoted to secretary. He then got into a bit of a tussle with his replacement, accusing the man of trying to murder him and then, later, holding on to some private security documents to blackmail the king. By some accounts, he was sent to prison for this and escaped from France to England, where he lived out the rest of his life as a woman, cross-dressing to protect his identity.

But he was so persuasive as a woman (and also flat-out refused to admit his gender when asked) that people took bets on what gender he was, and when he died in 1810, only an autopsy confirmed that he was a man. The people who knew d'Eon for the last three decades of his life had no idea, including his own housekeeper (who went into a "state of shock" following the discovery). Apparently, the French government, knowing that d'Eon had a ton of secret information that could really blow their cover (including plans to invade England), let d'Eon off the hook and allowed him to live out the rest of his life as a different person as a way to thank him for not spilling all their state secrets. They also went ahead and paid all his debts, like he requested, just to ensure their spot would not be blown the heck up. [Frevele/TheMarySue/22April2012]

The CIA's Mach 3 Recon Drone. Gary Power's failed sortie over Soviet Russia in 1960 prompted military brass to search for unmanned alternatives for performing recon over hostile territory. The D-21 drone was Lockheed's solution - launched from a modified A-12, it spied on Red China at over 2,000 MPH.

Lockheed began its work in late 1962 on a high-altitude, high-speed reconnaissance drone. Originally dubbed the Q-21, the drone was built to travel at Mach 3.3 - 3.5 on the back of a Marquardt RJ-43 ramjet engine and to fly more than 3,000 nautical miles at an altitude of at least 87,000 feet. The drone was 43 feet long, six feet tall, and weighed 11,200 pounds with a 19-foot-wide double delta wing design over a titanium frame. It was also designed to travel just one way. The D-21 would carry a single high-resolution camera over a programmed flight path, then jettison the camera (which would parachute down for mid-air retrieval), and the drone itself would self-destruct. At least, that's how it was supposed to work. [Read more: Tarantola/Gizmodo/23April2012]

Director of the Defense Intelligence Agency: Who Is Michael Flynn? The Pentagon's top spy agency, like the rest of the intelligence community, was roundly criticized for key intelligence failures in the run-up to the war in Iraq, including finding that Iraq was stockpiling weapons of mass destruction and had close relations with al-Qaeda. It will soon be led by one of those critics, who recently published a trenchant critique of American intelligence in Afghanistan. Lieutenant General Michael T. Flynn, an intelligence insider over his thirty-year career in Army intelligence, was nominated by President Barack Obama to be the next Director of the Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA). Primarily responsible for providing data on foreign militaries, DIA is part of the Department of Defense.

Born circa 1959 in Middletown, Rhode Island, Michael Flynn is one of nine children of Helen and Charles Flynn, who was a small-town banker. Growing up, Michael Flynn worked at local restaurants and as a lifeguard, graduating Middletown High School in 1977. Flynn earned a B.S. in Management at the University of Rhode Island, where he participated in the ROTC program, in 1981. Flynn has since earned an MBA in Telecommunications from Golden Gate University, an M.A. in Military Arts and Sciences from the United States Army Command and General Staff College, and an M.A. in National Security and Strategic Studies from the United States Naval War College.

Commissioned an Army second lieutenant in 1981, Flynn became an intelligence officer, platoon leader, and then instructor in his early days. Flynn's assignments included multiple tours at Ft Bragg, North Carolina with the 82d Airborne Division, 18th Airborne Corps, and Joint Special Operations Command, where he served in the 1983 invasion of Grenada and the 2005 invasion of Haiti. He also has served with the 25th Infantry Division at Schofield Barracks, Hawaii; the Joint Readiness Training Center at Fort Polk, Louisiana; and the Army's Intelligence Center at Fort Huachuca, Arizona.

Flynn served as the Assistant Chief of Staff, G2, XVIII Airborne Corps at Fort Bragg, North Carolina from June 2001 and the Director of Intelligence, Joint Task Force 180 in Afghanistan until July, 2002. He commanded the 111th Military Intelligence Brigade from June 2002 to June 2004, and was director of intelligence for Joint Special Operations Command from July 2004 to June 2007, with service in the invasions of Afghanistan and Iraq. He served as the director of intelligence, United States Central Command from June 2007 to July 2008,and director of intelligence, Joint Staff from July 11, 2008 to June 14, 2009. Flynn assumed duties as the Chief, CJ2, International Security Assistance Force, with the additional appointment as the CJ2, US Forces-Afghanistan on June 15, 2009. As such, he was NATO's director of military intelligence. [Read more: AllGov/23April2012]

Introverted? Then NSA Wants You. The National Security Agency's people are of a kind that's hard to find, said deputy Director Chris Inglis.

"If I lost my people today...it would take me probably 20 years to reconstitute the National Security Agency that I know and love today," he said. On the contrary, Inglis speculated, to replace what he called all the "machinery" at the agency wouldn't take more than a few years. 

The exact number of the agency's employee is classified, but it's "somewhere between 37,000 and one billion" joked Inglis, whose April 15 keynote on leadership kicked off the Federal Senior Management Conference held in Cambridge, Md.

Inglis also emphasized the importance of a diverse workforce in the federal government, saying NSA is "probably the biggest employer of introverts."

"If you at their first encounter embrace [introverts], celebrate them...you will get their best efforts forever," added Inglis, a self-proclaimed introvert who said it took him many years to become comfortable in situations that required him to take on a leadership role and be more outgoing. [Read more: Tuutti/FederalComputer/16April2012]

Spy Gadgets, Top Secret Documents and Bullet Holes: Aboard the U.S. Navy Ship Captured More than 40 years ago by North Korea. Its captivity is an enduring reminder of tensions between the United States and North Korea throughout the Cold War - the bullet holes riddling its rooms a frightening memory of the lives lost.

Now, more than 40 years after its capture by North Korean forces in 1968, photographs from aboard the USS Pueblo give a haunting insight into the lives of the men who struggled to maintain its control.

Walls of gauges, switches and typing and printing devices pay tribute to its few short months as a spying ship for the U.S., before it was seized and moored on the Taedong River in Pyongyang.

The vessel - the only ship of the U.S. Navy currently held captive - is now open to visitors as a museum in North Korea, its unpainted walls and unswept floors capturing a fearful moment in time.

Images taken aboard show stark rooms designed to focus on their mission; communication boards stretching into every corner and lookout spots throughout the ship.

The ship was seized on January 23, 1968; the U.S. Navy claimed it was in international waters, while North Korea said it was sailing within their territory.

The Japanese visitor, who took pictures for Rocket News 24, said his guide told him as he toured the vessel: 'Even today, America continues to beg the ship to be returned.'

The U.S. maintained it was an observation ship, while the North Koreans claimed it was a warship - a claim that could be supported by the scores of bullet holes in the ship, Rocket News reported.

According to the American account, Pueblo was on orders to intercept and conduct surveillance of Soviet ships when a North Korean sub chaser crept upon the vessel.

When it demanded the ship stand down or expect fire, the American commander attempted to move away but could not out-outmaneuver the sub chaser and growing numbers of torpedo boats. [Read more: DailyMail/17April2012]


Section III - COMMENTARY

Russian Spies Haven't Gone Away. 'He acts like he thinks the Cold War's still on," Vice President Joe Biden said when Mitt Romney recently called Russia America's No. 1 geopolitical foe. "I don't know where he's been." Actually, he's been right here - paying attention.

The vice president may be surprised to learn that there are as many Russian intelligence officers operating in the U.S. today as during the height of the Cold War - it is arrests and criminal proceedings that have fallen off.

We had nine full-blown Russian espionage cases in the 1980s, seven in the '90s, one in 2001 and then . . . nothing. It's been 11 years since the last Russian spy was arrested inside the U.S. government. But if you think that's good news, think again.

Robert Hanssen was arrested on Feb. 18, 2001, bringing to a close his 22-year career spying for the Soviet Union and then Russia while he was a special agent of the FBI. During that time he revealed some of our most sensitive national security secrets, costing lives and American taxpayers perhaps billions of dollars. Other security breaches could not be attributed to Hanssen or any known spy before him. The inescapable conclusion: There was another mole. And that was 11 years ago.

The principal job of most Russian intelligence officers is to find and recruit more Americans like Hanssen who have access to highly classified information. "Nothing has changed," warned Sergei Tretyakov, who defected in 2000 after running all Russian intelligence operations out of New York. "The SVR [KGB] rezidenturas in the U.S. are not less but in some respects even more active." From long and deep experience, these officers know what they are doing. 

When Tretyakov died in 2010, the FBI had roughly 7,800 open foreign counterintelligence investigations on the books, including a fair number involving Americans suspected of working under Moscow's control. Yet none of the latter has led to prosecutions in the last decade (unless you count repeat offender Harold Nicholson, whose original 1997 sentence was extended eight years when he tried to resume spying by tasking his own son from his jail cell).

Why not?

Espionage investigations are time and manpower intensive. They require the investment of years of detailed analysis, surveillance, translations, asset development, intelligence collection and other operations. This means a huge amount of work often around the clock by teams of people with nothing to show for it for years at a time, if ever. And legally, espionage cases are very difficult to make. [Read more: VanCleave/WallStreetJournal/20April2012]

CISPA Not the Right Way to Achieve Cybersecurity. There is a need for cybersecurity legislation, but CISPA - an overly broad bill that lacks restrictions on government abuse - is not the right way to achieve it.

CISPA allows companies to voluntarily share information pertaining to suspected attacks on their networks with other companies and the government. Operators of networks have said they need clearer legal authority to share this information. However, there are three major problems with how CISPA would allow Internet users' information to be shared and used.

- CISPA has an almost unlimited definition of what user information can be shared with the government. This definition should be narrowed to apply only to actual cyberattacks or threats.
- CISPA would allow companies to share Internet users' information directly with the National Security Agency. The National Security Agency is a super-secret agency with the dual roles of intelligence collection and protecting U.S. government networks. Entrusting the agency with private online communications also means trusting it not to use this information for intelligence purposes unrelated to cybersecurity. Once our information goes to the NSA, there will be little meaningful oversight of what the agency does with it. Information should instead go to the Department of Homeland Security, a civilian agency that will provide more accountability to the public for failure or abuse.
- CISPA would allow information shared with the government to be used for purposes unrelated to cybersecurity, including law enforcement purposes - this has the potential to turn cybersecurity into a new surveillance program. [Read more: Burman/USNews/18April2012]

Taking Uncle Sam for a Ride: How Pakistan Makes Washington Pay for the Afghan War. The following ingredients should go a long way to produce a political thriller. Mr. M, a jihadist in an Asian state, has emerged as the mastermind of a terrorist attack in a neighboring country, which killed six Americans. After sifting through a vast cache of intelligence and obtaining a legal clearance, the State Department announces a $10 million bounty for information leading to his arrest and conviction. Mr. M promptly appears at a press conference and says, "I am here. America should give that reward money to me."

A State Department spokesperson explains lamely that the reward is meant for incriminating evidence against Mr. M that would stand up in court. The prime minister of M's home state condemns foreign interference in his country's internal affairs. In the midst of this imbroglio, the United States decides to release $1.18 billion in aid to the cash-strapped government of the defiant prime minister to persuade him to reopen supply lines for U.S. and NATO forces bogged down in the hapless neighboring Islamic Republic of Afghanistan.

Alarmingly, this is anything but fiction or a plot for an upcoming international sitcom. It is a brief summary of the latest development in the fraught relations between the United States and Pakistan, two countries locked into an uneasy embrace since September 12, 2001.

Mr. M. is Hafiz Muhammad Saeed, a 62-year-old former academic with a tapering, hennaed beard, and the founder of the Lashkar-e Taiba (the Army of the Pure, or LeT), widely linked to several outrageously audacious terrorist attacks in India. The LeT was formed in 1987 as the military wing of the Jammat-ud Dawa religious organization (Society of the Islamic Call, or JuD) at the instigation of the Pakistani army's formidable intelligence agency, Inter-Services Intelligence (ISI). The JuD owes its existence to the efforts of Saeed, who founded it in 1985 following his return to his native Lahore after two years of advanced Islamic studies in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, under the guidance of that country's Grand Mufti, Shaikh Abdul Aziz bin Baz.

On its formation, the LeT joined the seven-year-old anti-Soviet jihad in Afghanistan, an armed insurgency directed and supervised by the ISI with funds and arms supplied by the CIA and the Saudis. [Read more: Hiro/HuffingtonPost/17April2012]


Section IV - Jobs, Author Inquiry, Books, Documentaries and Coming Events
 [IMPORTANT: AFIO does not "vet" or endorse these research inquiries or job offers. Reasonable-sounding inquiries and career offerings are published as a service to our members, and for researchers, educators, and subscribers. You are urged to exercise your usual caution and good judgment when responding or supplying any information.]

Counterintelligence Support Specialist (CI) to interview walk-in sources, conduct screenings, liaison with ISAF personnel, support security/OPSEC/force protection programs and produce timely written recommendations and assessments.

The candidate will provide direct support to CI Teams and Counterintelligence Support Teams (CST)s, as appropriate. The CISS shall provide routine and recurring support to CI and HUMINT activities from fixed and secure locations defined elsewhere in the PWS. CI Support Specialists conduct activities such as assisting specifically authorized government personnel in conducting debriefings, coordinating with installation units/personnel, support to OPSEC/TARP awareness programs, CI/security assessments, screening of locally employed persons (LEP screening), initial handling of walk-in sources, CI support to force protection, intelligence report quality control, administrative and analytical support to CI investigations or TARP cases, CI activities, and can support other operations. CI Support Specialists can also serve as a part of a CST and will be equipped to travel to and operate from multiple fixed sites within an assigned AO and in accordance with unit procedures, but will not conduct intelligence activities outside of secure areas (as defined elsewhere in the PWS or any activities which are inherently governmental). CI Support Specialists will provide examination support in conducting Preliminary Credibility Assessment Screening System (PCASS) examinations as required by ISAF/USFOR-A and consistent with applicable policy and SOPs.

Counterintelligence Support Specialist
This position requires individuals to be government trained counterintelligence agents with a minimum of 4 years of experience; however, on a case by case basis, a DoD HUMINT officer or a badge and credentialed Law Enforcement officer with at least 6 years on an accredited Local/State/or Federal Law Enforcement Agency is acceptable. The contractor shall be knowledgeable of Army/Joint counterintelligence procedures, doctrine and practices; and data processing systems such as CIDNE, DSOMS, CHIMS or its replacement system and SIPRNET search engines.
*        The CI Support Specialist must be experienced in working with and through interpreters, interview and solicitation techniques, CI principles and methods, development of screening/interview/debriefing plans, and evaluation of information requiring further investigation.
*        This position requires former military occupational specialty (MOS) 35L/M, 351L/M, 35E, or civilian 1811 or 0132 badged and credentialed CI Agent or DoD joint service equivalents.
*        This position requires current Secret Clearance, with TS preferred; knowledge of the Dari or Pashto language and Afghan culture a plus.

For additional information or to apply for this position, please e-mail careers@walsinghamgroup.com or visit www.walsinghamgroup.com

Adjunct Faculty Post Open for Homeland Security Course, Online, PT - Work from Anywhere

Online Adjunct Faculty Position Available - Homeland Security with AMERICAN MILITARY UNIVERSITY / American Public University System.

Synopsis of Role: Adjunct and full-time teaching faculty share our commitment to learning, teaching, interaction with students and faculty, service to our communities of practice, and scholarship. They are united by the common goal of inspiring academic excellence in students with a broad range of interests and experiences consistent with the Community of Inquiry Framework as adopted by APUS for cognitive presence, teaching presence, and social presence. They are key to creating a rewarding online learning experience for students by engaging them, challenging them, and supporting them. They contribute to and participate in a range of activities related to effectiveness and excellence in teaching and student retention. Faculty members remain aware of discipline content intent for the courses they teach. They follow APUS guidelines, processes, and methods and are responsive to mentoring and coaching.

Required Experience:  • Ph.D. or Juris Doctorate from a regionally accredited institution is required. • Proficient in Microsoft Office Suite programs required. • Record of excellence in teaching. • College-level teaching experience is required. • Online teaching experience is preferred. 

Required Areas of Expertise or Experience (at least one): • Counterterrorism • Immigration Enforcement • Immigration Services • Homeland Security Law • Domestic Radicalization • Weapons of Mass Destruction • Risk Analysis / Threat Analysis • Critical Infrastructure Protection • Law Enforcement • Cyber Information Security.

Academic Responsibilities and Essential Functions: • Teaching excellence ◦ Deliver online lessons to undergraduate and/or graduate students. ◦ Initiate, facilitate, interact and moderate online classroom forums. ◦ Be a faculty leader in your classes embracing fully the Community of Inquiry Framework of Teaching Presence, Cognitive Presence, and Social Presence. ◦ Evaluate and grade students' class work, assignments, and papers within the timeframe set forth by APUS policy providing effective feedback to guide student learning and success. ◦ Comply with APUS guidelines and expectations for quality faculty engagement online. ◦ Engage in the classroom and reply to emails, etc. at least every other day, including one day during the weekend. ◦ Remain aware of classroom procedures and use of instructional materials. ◦ Participate in professional development to enhance teaching skills. • Attend discipline specific and administrative meetings as scheduled. • Maintain 'discipline' knowledge by participating in one's own discipline-related professional communities. • Support APUS initiatives and departments.

Job Location: Remote/Online

Position Type: Part-Time

Work Environment and Physical Demands: This is a remote position. Candidates will need to supply their own office equipment and internet connection.

To Apply: https://apus.silkroad.com/epostings/index.cfm?version=1&company_id=16175
Questions? Email aclayton@apus.edu

Seeking Information on Two Former CIA Colleagues: Barbara Robbins, Grace Joyce - for major story on dedication & brave lives of CIA Officers

Hi everyone, This is Ian Shapira from the Washington Post writing again. I am wrapping up the reporting on my piece on Barbara A. Robbins, the first female CIA employee to have been killed in action. She died when a car bomb exploded outside the US Embassy in Saigon in March 1965. I am looking for one of her good friends, Grace Joyce, also an employee, perhaps a secretary, at the Agency. Any and all leads about Grace or Barbara are welcome. My email is: shapirai@washpost.com and phone number is 202-334-7572. Best, Ian 

Gallipoli Enigma: Forgotten Role of Urbane British Spy Exposed in Documentary. He was the Gallipoli spy who might have ended World War I countless lives earlier. Like Ian Fleming's fictitious hero James Bond, the Cambridge-educated Clarence Palmer was urbane, multilingual, self-reliant, knowledgeable about weaponry and a Royal Naval officer.

Yet as a new documentary on the History Channel this Anzac Day reveals, Palmer's role at Gallipoli remains a great unsolved mystery.

Gallipoli From Above: The Untold Story is based on Hugh Dolan's controversial 2010 book, 36 Days.

Dolan, a former Australian military intelligence officer, served during the Iraq war. His book, examining the military planning that went into the birth of the Anzac legend on April 25, 1915, upset military historians.

The Anzac myth claims the nation's identity was forged in a crucible of failure. That the first Anzac ''lions'' landed on the wrong beach at dawn with little knowledge of the formidable Turkish defences because they were led by elitist British ''donkeys''.

But the film - using historic footage, modern graphics, unexplored Turkish reports and helicopter footage of the inhospitable terrain - comes to a vastly different conclusion.

The initial Anzac landings were planned by Australians and were an outstanding success. [Read more: Meacham/SydneyMorningHerald/22April2012]

Espionage on the High Seas. In late 1974, someone slipped a note under the door of the Soviet Embassy in Washington. "Certain authorities of the United States," the anonymous author claimed, "are taking measures to raise the Soviet submarine sunk in the Pacific Ocean." The note was signed simply: "Well-wisher."

Anatoly Dobrynin, the Soviet ambassador to Washington, reported the warning to Moscow and demanded an explanation from Secretary of State Henry Kissinger - "we cannot be indifferent to any operation of raising any parts and property of the submarine." The submarine being referred to was K-129, which had gone down in 1968 in the north Pacific. For the Soviets the sinking of the sub was both a tragedy - six sailors were lost - and a potential intelligence disaster: K-129 carried operations manuals, codebooks and nuclear weapons.

The only solace for the Soviets at the time was their confident belief that the U.S. would never find K-129 - they themselves had repeatedly failed to do so - much less raise it from the deepest beds of the Pacific Ocean. But by the time the note from "Well-wisher" arrived at the Soviet Embassy, an American attempt to recover the sub was already under way, in what has to count as one of the oddest episodes of the Cold War.

David Sharp's "The CIA's Greatest Operation" is the story of Project Azorian, the code name given to the CIA's covert recovery mission. The engineering challenge was daunting, to say the least: to locate the sunken sub; find a way to hoist it to the surface; and to do so in utter secrecy in waters three miles deep. There was no precedent for such an operation. Mr. Sharp details the myriad ideas that went nowhere until a workable plan was agreed upon. [Read more: Nagorski/WallStreetJournal/20April2012]

To Russia, With Love. With so much having been written about the espionage case involving Alger Hiss and Whittaker Chambers, is there a need for yet another book on this riveting and contentious Cold War battle? Christina Shelton, a retired analyst at the Defense Intelligence Agency, thinks there is. She worries that many Americans don't have sufficient knowledge of the case and that others fail to grasp its significance. Written in the style of an intelligence analyst's brief, "Alger Hiss: Why He Chose Treason" is aimed at readers with a vague notion of the episode and puzzlement about why it became such a big event in American history.

Ms. Shelton provides a workmanlike account of Alger Hiss's journey from a troubled middle-class Baltimore family to a high-level position in the State Department and surveys a variety of explanations for his decision to aid the Soviet Union. And she offers several provocative but not always convincing assertions about why Hiss's guilt remains such a polarizing matter more than half a century after his conviction for lying to a grand jury about his espionage.

The outlines and many of the details of the Hiss case have been thoroughly dissected in books and articles across the years, and Ms. Shelton concedes that her book "covers familiar ground." She acknowledges that gaps remain in the historical record. From the KGB archives we now have damaging tidbits, but the files of Soviet military intelligence, the GRU, Hiss's employer, remain closed; we still do not know how or exactly when Hiss went from being a promising lawyer with left-wing sympathies to a Soviet spy working within the U.S. government.

Even without GRU files, Ms. Shelton notes, a vast amount of evidence confirms Hiss's guilt. Documentary evidence supports Chambers's account of their interactions during the 1930s, when Chambers, then a communist, received government documents from Hiss. Archival material from Hungary, Russia and the U.S. also buttresses his claims. KGB officers openly discussed Hiss's work for "the neighbors" - that is, Soviet military intelligence - and lamented that their own agency did not have a source so perfectly placed to obtain secrets.

Why, then, does a belief in Hiss's innocence remain a hardy perennial in academic culture? [Read more: Klehr/WallStreetJournal/19April2012]


Coming Educational Events

EDUCATIONAL EVENTS IN COMING TWO MONTHS....

MANY Spy Museum Events in April, May, and beyond, with full details are listed on the AFIO Website at www.afio.com. The titles for some of these are in detail below and online.

5 May 2012, 11:30am - 2pm - Melbourne, FL - AFIO Florida Satellite Chapter meets to hear Col. Jespersen on T.E. Lawrence

11:30 social hour with cash bar. Lunch 12:30.
Speaker will be Col. Robert Randolph Jespersen who will discuss T.E. Lawrence: soldier-scholar and his impact on guerilla warfare doctrine.
Location: Eau Gallie Yacht Club.
RSVP to POC Donna Czarnecki, donnacz12@aol.com

Tuesday, 8 May 2012, noon – 1 pm – Washington, DC - "Spies and Commisars: The Early Years of the Russian Revolution" at the International Spy Museum

Russia was a chaotic hotspot after the Revolution of 1917, torn by Civil War between the Bolsheviks and the White Russians. While Lenin and Trotsky tried to spread their revolution across Europe and the great powers attempted to extinguish the Bolshevik experiment, an extraordinary collection of adventurers, opportunists, journalists, and spies poured into the roiling Russian political scene. Outsized characters like Sidney "Ace of Spies" Reilly, communist activist John Reed, and author Somerset Maugham all played their parts…under the watchful eye of Feliks Dzerzhinsky, the head of the ruthless Cheka, the first of the Soviet state security organizations. Join renowned British historian Robert Service for a discussion of his thrilling new book about this turning point of twentieth century history.
Free! No registration required. For directions go to www.spymuseum.org

Wednesday, 9 May 2012, 11:30 am - Scottsdale, AZ - "The FBI's Foreign Intelligence Operations during WWII" - presentation by Arthur Kerns at AFIO Arizona Luncheon

The FBI's Special Intelligence Service (SIS) was authorized by Presidential order in May 1940 to conduct foreign intelligence operations in the western hemisphere. Retired Special Agent Arthur Kerns will discuss the origins and operations of this little known intelligence group that existed from 1940 to 1946.
Arthur Kerns served for 24 years with the FBI, retiring from FBI Headquarters in 1988. He now writes mysteries and thrillers and his short fiction appears in a number of anthologies.
New Location: McCormick Ranch Golf Course, 7505 McCormick Parkway, Scottsdale AZ 85258
WE WILL NEED FOR EVERY MEETING an RSVP no later than 72 hours ahead of time; in the past, not reserving or cancelling without prior notice (72 hours prior to the meeting) created much grief for those of us organizing the meeting and dealing with the personnel!
WE ARE charged for the no-shows and please remember, we are a small organization with a humble coffer!
We would therefore APPRECIATE that you all respond to this email to confirm your presence (or not).
Our meeting fees will be as follows: $20.00 for AFIO members, $22.00 for guests
For reservations or questions, please email Simone at simone@4smartphone.net or simone@afioaz.org or call and leave a message on 602.570.6016

Wednesday, 9 May 2012, 6:30 – 8:30 p.m – Washington, DC - "Manhunt: The Ten-Year Search for Bin Laden - From 9/11 to Abbottabad" at the International Spy Museum

"Tonight, I can report…that the United States has conducted an operation that killed Osama bin Laden."—US President Barack Obama, May 1, 2011

When Osama bin Laden declared war against the United States for the first time to a Western audience, Peter Bergen was there. He produced Osama bin Laden's first television interview. His book, The Osama bin Laden I Know: An Oral History of al Qaeda's Leader, was named one of the best non-fiction books of 2006. Bergen has continued to write and report extensively on bin Laden and the conflict between the US and al Qaeda for publications ranging from The New York Times to Rolling Stone. He's produced award-winning documentaries on the subject matter, and in his latest book he has turned his attention to the hunt and termination of the notorious terrorist. Join us for an inside account of Bergen's professional connection to bin Laden, his perspective on the decade-long hunt to capture or kill him, and his thoughts on the results of Operation Neptune Spear.
WHERE: International Spy Museum: 800 F Street, NW Washington, DC Gallery Place/Chinatown Metrorail Station
Tickets: $15.00 Register at www.spymuseum.org

10 May 2012, 8:30 am - 5 pm - Stony Brook, LI, NY - "The History of Spying: Espionage In America" Conference at Long Island Spy Museum

An exclusive opportunity to explore the art of spycraft.
9:00-9:30: Coffee/Light Refreshments; 9:30-9:45: Introduction by Master of Ceremonies; Actor Peter Firth from the critically acclaimed television series MI-5.; 9:45-10:45: Michael Sulick | Former Director of the US National Clandestine Service and 28-year veteran of the Central Intelligence Agency: "Revolutionary War Espionage & George Washington's Spies."; 10:45-11:45: Bill Birnes | New York Times bestselling author, TV personality, espionage historian and New York University School of Law graduate: "WWII-Office of Strategic Services (OSS): The Birth of an Intelligence Agency; Patriots, Buccaneers & Movie Stars."; 11:45-12:45: LUNCH BREAK; 12:45-1:45: General Michael Hayden | Former Director of both the Central Intelligence Agency & National Security Agency: "CIA, the War on Terror, and the Killing of Bin Laden."; 1:45- 2:00: Coffee Break.; 2.00-3:00: Cindy Webb | Former Chief of Counter Intelligence, Central Intelligence Agency: "Counterintelligence in the Cold War and Beyond."; 3:00-4:00: Tom Betro | Former Director of the Naval Criminal Investigative Service (NCIS): "Counterintelligence 2.0; CI Challenges and Opportunities in the Internet Era."; 4:00-4:30: Q&A session;
4.30-4:40: Closing Remarks.
Admission $25.00 Doors open: 8:30 AM. Limited seating available. To purchase tickets visit: www.LongIslandSpyMuseum.org
Long Island Spy Museum, 275 Christian Ave, Stony Brook, NY 11790
Call 631-371-1473 for additional information.

11-13 May 2012 - North Conway, NH - The New England Chapter of the Naval Cryptologic Veterans Association (NCVA-NE) holds Spring Mini-Reunion

Location: North Conway Grand Hotel, North Conway, New Hampshire. The registration cut-off date for the event is 27 April 2012. For additional information, local members and prospective members may call (518) 664-8032 or visit http://ncva-ne.org

Thursday, 17 May 2012, 11:30 - Englewood, CO - The AFIO Rocky Mountain Chapter presents Ray Levesque - the new DIA Representative to NORAD

The AFIO Rocky Mountain Chapter presents Ray Levesque - the new DIA Representative to NORADNorthCom, J2's SIO in Iraq and recently back from work in Mexico. This is a joint meeting of AFIO and Denver INFRAGARD. will be held at Centennial Airport. There are seating limitations of 45 seats so we will accept reservations on a first come first serve basis. You will receive directions when you RSVP to Tom VanWormer at robsmom@pcisys.net. The lunch will cost $12.00. You can pay at the door.

Friday, 18 May 2012, 6:30 – 9:30 pm – Washington, DC - "Surveillance 101 with Eric O'Neill" at the International Spy Museum

Test your surveillance skills on the mean streets of DC!

What if you were assigned to watch the most damaging spy in US history? As a young operative in the FBI, Eric O'Neill was put into position as Robert Hanssen's assistant with the secret task of spying on his boss, who was under suspicion of working for Russia.$7 O'Neill's background with the FBI was in surveillance, so he was up to the challenge. But how would you measure up? It's your chance to find out. O'Neill is prepared to share his hard-earned expertise with you. This intense small group introduction to surveillance will include learning the basics and conducting surveillance in the streets of DC. Will you be able to track the "Rabbit" without being "made?" You'll learn how to snap clandestine shots and keep your target in view so you won't miss operational acts or secret meetings. O'Neill will lead the exercise and help you learn how to blend into the shadows for the best spy results!
WHERE: International Spy Museum: 800 F Street, NW Washington, DC Gallery Place/Chinatown Metrorail Station
Tickets $94.00. Space is limited to only 10 participants – advance registration required. Call 202 654-0932 to register.

Sunday, 20 May 2012, 6 pm - McLean, VA - NMIA/NMIF Hosts 38th Awards Banquet

The 38th Military Intelligence Community Awards Banquet includes dinner and awards presentation recognizing achievement of Intelligence Professionals from DoD Components, National Intelligence Agencies, and the Department of Homeland Security. Event takes place at the McLean Hilton Hotel. Cocktails 1800 hrs; Dinner & Awards Ceremony 1800 hrs. Mess Dress/Black Tie Preferred. This is an important event by a fine group and you are urged to consider attending. Details as well as reservation forms available at http://bit.ly/HHxZ7z

Thursday, 24 May 2012, 6 pm - New York, NY - AFIO NY Metro meets to hear Dr. Vadim Birstein on Stalin's SMERSH

Dr. Vadim Birstein - Russian American who arrived in the US in 1991, is a historian, a molecular geneticist and author of over 150 scientific papers, three
scientific books and one history book. www.vadimbirstein.com/bio.htm
Dr. Birstein's new book "SMERSH" an acronym of the Russian phrase "Death to Spies." "SMERSH" was Stalin's secret weapon, Soviet Military Counterintelligence during WWll. Dr. Birstein
reveals for the first time the structure of this super secret organization, its torture and execution of countless Soviet officers and servicemen and its brazen arrest of foreign civilians, the recovery of Hitler's body and its completely unknown involvement in the Nuremberg trials and much, much more.
RSVP: Strongly suggested, not required. Email afiometro@yahoo.com
Location: 3 West Club, 3 West 51st St, NYC
Cost: $45/person including buffet dinner & cash bar.

Friday, 1 June 2012 - Tysons Corner, VA - AFIO Summer Luncheon featuring former Director, CIA NCS Jose A Rodriguez plus a morning author. Hold the date.

HOLD THE DATE on your calendar for this special AFIO Summer Luncheon which features former CIA National Clandestine Service Director Jose A. Rodriguez, Jr. on his long-anticipated book: HARD MEASURES: How Aggressive CIA Actions After 9/11 Saved American Lives, co-authored with Bill Harlow [author, former Director of the Office of Public Affairs, CIA]. Registration for this special luncheon begins next week.
Morning speaker TBA.

2 June 2012 - San Diego, CA - 70th Anniversary of Battle of Midway, Naval Postgraduate School

Reservations are now being accepted for the 70th Anniversary of the Battle of Midway Dining-Out at the Naval Postgraduate School on Saturday 2 June. This annual event is led by the NPS Student Council in coordination with the Monterey Bay Commander of the Naval Order of the United States, the Monterey Peninsula Council of the Navy League. The honoree President of the Mess is Vice Admiral Dan Oliver, USN (Ret), President of the Naval Postgraduate School, the President of the Mess is Captain Gerral David, USN, Commanding Officer, Naval Support Activity Monterey, and LT Ryan Birkelbach, USN is Mr. Vice. The guest speaker will be Admiral Gary Roughead, the 29th Chief of Naval Operations.

The 2012 Midway theme is the "Priceless Advantage: Winning the Battles of Coral Sea, Midway and the Aleutians with Communications Intelligence" and will focus on past, present, and future issues in communications intelligence, cryptanalytics, lingusitics, and information analysis to support decision making.
Admiral Roughead is currently the Annenberg Distinguished Visiting Fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University. He was an early leader establishing social media tools in the Navy, creating the Information Dominance and Assurance programs, the Navy Cyber Command, and standing up the Navy's 10th Fleet at Fort George G. Meade.
You might find it useful to read the history of winning Midway by a National Security Agency historian, Dr. Frederick D. Parker " A Priceless Advantage." The NSA Midway communications intelligence history download address is: http://www.nsa.gov/about/_files/cryptologic_heritage/publications/wwii/priceless_advantage.pdf
A principal figure who led the OP20G team at Pearl Harbor 14th Naval District breaking the Imperial Japanese Navy code JN-25 and assembling sufficient intelligence to reveal the plans of the Japanese fleet was LCDR Joe Rochefort - he was the direct interface to the Pacific Fleet Commander Admiral Nimitz at the Combat Intelligence Center aka Station H or "HYPO". Supporting Rochefort was a young Navy Ensign, Donald "Mac" Showers who arrived in February 1942. Admiral Showers retired in 1971 as Director of Naval Intelligence, then spent another 12 years at the CIA on special assignments to the director. Our access to an eye-witness of this caliber, the only one still alive, is well beyond our expectations.
A special DVD will be produced which features Adm Mac Showers, now 92, who retired in 1971 as Director of Naval Intelligence, then spent 12 yrs at CIA. He will give his personal account of what happened during Midway. Dr. Summers has worked with most of the key parties involved in the code breaking operations at Pearl Harbor in 1942 to produce an outstanding documentary.
To register: http://www.nps.edu/midway/
Reservations are now being taken and know you will want to reserve a place at this historic event!
Upon making your reservations, your names will be added to the gate security access list.
Contact Captain Ken Johnson, USN (Ret.), 2012 Battle of Midway Team Coordinator nousmtyken@sbcglobal.net and 831-657-9793 for further details.


For Additional Events two+ months or greater....view our online Calendar of Events


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