AFIO Weekly Intelligence Notes #22-12 dated 5 June 2012

[Editors' Note: The WIN editors attempt to include a wide range of articles and commentary in the Weekly Notes to inform and educate our readers. However, the views expressed in the articles are purely those of the authors, and in no way reflect support or endorsement from the WIN editors or the AFIO officers and staff. We welcome comments from the WIN readers on any and all articles and commentary.]
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CONTENTS

Section I - INTELLIGENCE HIGHLIGHTS

Section II - CONTEXT & PRECEDENCE

Section III - COMMENTARY

Section IV -    Books and Documentaries, Letters to the Editors and Coming Events

Books and Documentaries

Letters to the Editors

Coming Educational Events

Current Calendar New and/or Next Two Months ONLY


College Costs Giving You Sticker-Shock?

An intelligence education can be costly,
but it's an important investment in your -- and your country's -- future.

And do not ruin yours - or their - chances of Intelligence Community employment with large, unpaid student loans hanging over a budding career. Too much a security risk. Use AFIO and other scholarships, and choose the most reasonably-priced educational facility teaching in this field, for your education.

Let AFIO help you -- or your children -- with the fees
of an intelligence career-oriented field of study.
We have generous scholarships for undergraduate or graduate school students. Applicants can do the entire, brief application online - once - to be considered for all available AFIO scholarships.
Do not delay.
The deadline is midnight, Sunday, July 1, 2012.

Explore scholarship options here and apply.

Note: Deadline is midnight SUNDAY, July 1.


Wednesday, 13 June 2012, 1000-1130 - Annapolis Junction, Maryland

The Camouflage Project

Part of the NCMF Cryptologic Program Series

The Ohio State University Drama Department's Theatrical Exhibition Team will perform The Camouflage Project as part of the National Cryptologic Museum Foundation's Cryptologic Program Series. Click on image above to explore on Ohio State University website. Or view info on this event as it will be performed at the NCMF June 13 event here.
The performance is based on the mission of four female British agents who operated behind German lines in France during World War II. Through exhibition stations and a performance of mime and dance you will learn how the agents used camouflage and code systems training to conceal themselves and communicate with allied forces.
The project leaders are Professors Lesley Ferris and Mary Tarantino whose research led them to the gates of the Natzweiler-Struthof concentration camp, where the four women, who had assisted in the escape of British soldiers, were executed in July 1944. How and why were they captured? Were they sacrificed to protect D-Day? You will not want to miss this saga of clandestine warfare.
The presentation will be held on Wednesday, 13 June 2012, 1000-1130 at the L-3 Stratis Conference Center, 2720 Technology Dr, Annapolis Junction, MD in the National Business Park (NBP). Lunch will be served following the program.
FEE: The Camouflage Program fee is $15 for NCMF members. The guest fee is $40, which includes an NCMF membership. Please make your check payable to NCMF and send to: NCMF Cryptologic Program Series,
PO Box 1682, Ft. Meade, MD 20755-1682. Send by COB 11 June. Inquiries to cryptmf@aol.com

Early Warning...

Special Notice To AFIO Members
Upcoming CIA Conferences 2012-2014
Put Dates on your Calendars
Registration information supplied as it becomes available.

August 2012 - Keyport, WA - "Underwater Ice Station Zebra" - a CIA Historic Documents 'Release Event' Presentation [possibly with Naval Undersea Museum]

Exact August date TBD. The Trieste II Deep Sea Vehicle I (DSV-1), the U.S. Navy's most advanced deep sea submersible, surfaced 350 miles northeast of the Hawaiian Islands in the dead of night on the morning of 26 April 1972 having just salvaged a mysterious item from 16,400 feet. The full story of this little known operation has remained hidden behind secrecy, rumor, and speculation until now. With access to sources from three agencies, An Underwater Ice Station Zebra reveals how the CIA and U.S. Navy undertook a dangerous mission, never before attempted, in the deepest undersea expedition of its time – twenty-eight months before CIA's more known salvage involving the Hughes Glomar Explorer. Presentation by David W. Waltrop, program manager in the CIA Historical Collections Division. Served previously as the National Reconnaissance Office (NRO) deputy-chief historian, editor of NRO's quarterly publication, and curator of the Defense Intelligence Agency. [Waltrop will also be giving this presentation at the Raleigh Spy Conference 22-24 August in Raleigh, NC. Further information below and here.]

13 September 2012 - Fairfax, VA - "The DCI Papers" - a CIA Historical Documents 'Release Event' Conference co-hosted with George Mason University's School of Public Policy.
Event tentatively will feature presentations by former DCIs including Michael Hayden (confirmed), James Woolsey (confirmed), Leon Panetta (confirmed), Porter Goss (confirmed), William Webster, and other invited officials. Further details will follow as they are released to AFIO. HOLD THE DATE. AFIO members will receive a special invitation to this event.

October 2012 - Washington, DC - "The Warsaw Pact" - a CIA Historical Documents 'Release Event' Conference co-hosted with the National War College at Ft. McNair.
Exact October date to be decided and will be announced here, with additional program details, as these are released to AFIO. HOLD THE DATE.
Description: Icon CalendarCIA 'Release Event' Conferences Coming In 2013

January 2013 - location TBD - "Dr. Zhivago" - a CIA Historical Documents 'Release Event' Conference. Newly released documents that present the real story behind the clandestine publication of the Zhivago story. Exact January date to be decided and will be announced here, with additional program details, as these are released to AFIO.

January 2013 - Yorba Linda, CA [Nixon Library] - "Nixon and the Middle East" - a CIA Historical Documents 'Release Event' Conference co-hosted with the Nixon Library
Exact January date to be decided and will be announced here, with additional program details, as these are released to AFIO.

February or March 2013 - Newport, RI [US Naval War College] - "The Soviet Navy" - a CIA Historical Documents 'Release Event' Conference co-hosted with the U.S. Naval War College
Exact February or March date to be decided and will be announced here, with additional program details, as these are released to AFIO.

March 2013 - McLean, VA - "Typist to Trailblazer" - a CIA Historical Documents 'Release Event' Conference. Features women's advancement, including Petticoat Panel Report, and other achievements that brought women into higher positions beyond the typing pool. Exact March date to be decided and will be announced here, with additional program details, as these are released to AFIO.

June 2013 - location TBD - "Berlin II" - a CIA Historical Documents 'Release Event' Conference. Co-host TBA. Exact June date to be decided and will be announced here, with additional program details, as these are released to AFIO.

June 2013 - Little Rock, AR [Clinton Library] - "President William J. Clinton and Bosnia" - a CIA Historical Documents 'Release Event' Conference co-hosted with the William J. Clinton Presidential Center
Exact June date to be decided and will be announced here, with additional program details, as these are released to AFIO.

August 2013 - location TBD - "CIA's Directorate of Science & Technology - 50th Anniversary" - a CIA Historical Documents 'Release Event' Conference co-hosted with a major U.S. University [TBA]
Exact August date to be decided and will be announced here, with additional program details, as these are released to AFIO.

October 2013 - Atlanta, GA [Carter Library] - "President Jimmy Carter and the Camp David Accords" - a CIA Historical Documents 'Release Event' Conference co-hosted by the Jimmy Carter Library and Museum
Exact October date to be decided and will be announced here, with additional program details, as these are released to AFIO.

June 2014 - location TBD - "HEXAGON" - a CIA Historical Documents 'Release Event' Conference. Co-hosts TBA. Exact June 2014 date to be decided and will be announced here, with additional program details, as these are released to AFIO.


8th Raleigh Spy Conference [RSC] Announced

22-24 August 2012, Raleigh, North Carolina

22-24 August 2012 - Raleigh, NC - 8th Annual Raleigh Spy Conference [RSC]
THEME Dramatic Revelations: J. Edgar Hoover, Castro, Deep Throat, Carlos the Jackal, and Secrets from the CIA.
  The event underscores how recently declassified information re-writes history.
John Fox The FBI is not simply the nation's top cop agency, says RSC founder Bernie Reeves. The Bureau serves as America's domestic security service, responsible for tracking down spies in America and running counter-intelligence operations. And J. Edgar Hoover, the man who shaped and ran the FBI from 1924 to his death in 1972, was the nation's top domestic intelligence officer.
But who was the real Hoover? FBI Historian John Fox will present a session on Hoover's role as chief intelligence officer - and share the latest declassified data on one of the most significant figures in United States history.
Brian Latell PhD Fidel Castro casts a long shadow over modern American history. He led a revolution, unexpectedly embraced communism and invited the Soviets to Cuba who installed offensive nuclear weapons 90 miles from the United States.
Brian Latell, formerly a Cuba hand for the CIA, has plowed through newly declassified documents - and interviewed secret Cuban agents who can now talk for the first time - for his new book Castro's Secrets, revealing that the Cuban intelligence services were highly sophisticated. Cuban operatives duped the CIA and planted nearly 50 double agents in the US intelligence services. Latell also reveals from secret sources that Castro had prior knowledge of the assassination of John F. Kennedy.
Max Holland Max Holland, editor of the insider website Washington Decoded - and a prolific and respected author on key events of the modern era - has dug into newly declassified documents to reveal the true story of the motivation that compelled FBI assistant director Mark Felt to disguise himself as the infamous Deep Throat, the source that allegedly brought down a presidency and elevated two obscure journalists to super-star status. Watergate remains a watershed event in American history - and Mark Felt was the man who made it happen.
David Waltrop David Waltrop, a CIA officer currently serving as a Program Manager in the Agency's Historical Collections Division will share the recently declassified story of one of the most secret operations of the Cold War. Called "Underwater Ice Station Zebra," this little-known undersea mission was hidden in rumor and speculation - until now.
Albert Grajales Albert Grajales, INTERPOL Director of Puerto Rico and Coordinator of Intelligence / Antiterrorism Office of the Attorney General (Secretary of Justice) and the Special Investigations Bureau (SIB) of Puerto Rico will present an insider's assessment of the profile of the modern terrorist, beginning with Carlos the Jackal up to today's dangerous operatives.

The conference is honored again by the presence of representatives of the Historic Collections Division of the CIA, who will provide attractive booklets – some containing DVDs – on key declassified documents and assessments.

According to Bernie Reeves, "Conference guests last year were truly impressed by the formerly secret information on critical topics  in the booklets. Topics ranged from  Korea to Air America, from Warsaw Pact planning to the private papers of former CIA director Richard Helms.
And they are free to registered attendees."

"We are fortunate to have a speaker roster of this caliber for the 8th spy conference," says Reeves. "I feel we are addressing and explaining top subjects that have continued to be shrouded in mystery. I am very excited that we continue to live up to our reputation as the best intelligence conference for the general public in the world".

Go to www.raleighspyconference.com for more information and to register.
Or call  Carlie Sorosiak at the Metro Magazine office: 919-831-0999 or email carlie@metromagazine.net.  

The Raleigh Spy Conference was founded in 2003 by Bernie Reeves, editor and publisher of Raleigh Metro Magazine (www.metronc.com). Discounts are offered for intelligence workers, members of the armed forces, students, and seniors.

Bernie Reeves and Raleigh Metro Magazine will be hosting this 8th Raleigh Spy Conference at the North Carolina Museum of History in downtown Raleigh.

Father's Day Gift Hunting? For a very cool 6-DVD set of the 7th Raleigh Spy Conference on Russian Illegals, view and order here

 

Section I - INTELLIGENCE HIGHLIGHTS

House Votes Small Boost in Intelligence Spending. The House voted to give the intelligence community a few billion dollars more Thursday than the White House wanted for next year's budget - a price tag that covers the range of intelligence needs from the CIA to the high-tech satellites that spied on Osama bin Laden's compound.

The White House registered its objection before the vote, but did not threaten to veto the bill, which the House passed 386-28.

The bill now heads to the Senate, which will vote on its own version of the 2013 intelligence budget.

The White House had asked for $72 billion to fund spying activities in 2013, but the House voted for a "modest" increase to pay for satellite and other spying technology, House Intelligence Committee Chairman Mike Rogers, R-Mich., said.

The House request is classified. But the amount is 4 percent less than last year's budget, added Rep. Dutch Ruppersberger, D-Md. The Associated Press has reported last year's total budget as just under $80 billion. A decrease of 4 percent would put this year's House request at about $77 billion.

Last year, Congress said no to White House requests that would have expanded an intelligence community that's been growing exponentially since Sept. 11, 2001.

This year, under the threat of automatic spending cuts, it was the White House's turn to try to make reductions.

The main sticking point is the cost of commercial satellite imagery, according to Steve Aftergood of the Federation of American Scientists. "The industry and its congressional supporters want this area fully funded," he said. [Read more: Dozier/AP/31May2012]

Declassified CIA al-Qaida, bin Laden Documents Now Online. Recently declassified CIA documents concerning al-Qaida, Osama bin Laden and Sept. 11 are now available for your perusal.

Intelwire.com, a national security website, on Thursday posted online nearly 800 pages of documentation it received in response to a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request filed with the CIA.

The website notes: "It is highly unusual to receive any material from the CIA in response to a FOIA request, and they provide a fascinating look at the state of the agency's understanding of Al Qaeda over the years."

Documents related to hijacker Khalid Almihdhar, bin Laden, the al-Qaida terrorist network and other topics are included. [Read more: Hartman/IntelWire/1June2012]

China Arrests Security Official on Suspicion of Spying for U.S. A Chinese state security official has been arrested on suspicion of spying for the United States, sources said, a case both countries have kept quiet for several months as they strive to prevent a fresh crisis in relations.

The official, an aide to a vice minister in China's security ministry, was arrested and detained early this year on allegations that he had passed information to the United States for several years on China's overseas espionage activities, said three sources, who all have direct knowledge of the matter.

The aide had been recruited by the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency and provided "political, economic and strategic intelligence", one source said, though it was unclear what level of information he had access to, or whether overseas Chinese spies were compromised by the intelligence he handed over.

The case could represent China's worst known breach of state intelligence in two decades and its revelation follows two other major public embarrassments for Chinese security, both involving U.S. diplomatic missions at a tense time for bilateral ties.

The aide, detained sometime between January and March, worked in the office of a vice-minister in China's Ministry of State Security, the source said. The ministry is in charge of the nation's domestic and overseas intelligence operations.

He had been paid hundreds of thousands of U.S. dollars and spoke English, the source added.

"The destruction has been massive," another source said. [Read more: Reuters/1June2012]

CIA Reviewing Ex-Employee Book Policy. The U.S. Central Intelligence Agency is vetting the panel that vets books by former employees to determine whether they reveal agency secrets, officials say.

The Publications Review Board is supposed to focus only on security issues. But officials told The Washington Post there is concern it is being used to keep criticism from coming to light.

The agency would not comment.

Ali Soufan, a former FBI agent involved in questioning CIA prisoners, told the Post the CIA forced him to remove information that came from testimony at public hearings. He said the book, "The Black Banners: The Inside Story of 9/11 and the War Against al-Qaeda," which questions CIA interrogation techniques, had already been cleared by the FBI.

The book was published with black marks to show where material had been removed. [Read more: UPI/1June/2012]

Ex-Blackwater Executives Finger CIA in Weapons Trial. Five ex-Blackwater executives, facing federal firearms charges in connection with a gift of weaponry to a Middle Eastern monarch, have come up with a new explanation for how it occurred:

It was a CIA operation.

In court papers filed last month in Raleigh, the defendants say the gift of five guns to King Abdullah II of Jordan during a royal visit to Blackwater's Moyock, N.C., headquarters in March 2005 was requested, directed and authorized by the Central Intelligence Agency.

Attorneys for the five have filed declarations from two retired CIA officials, including a former Jordan station chief, who say they are familiar with the circumstances of the king's visit and would be willing to testify about it.

The CIA did not respond to a request for comment.

It's a new wrinkle in a case that dates to April 2010, when the five security company executives were indicted on a variety of felony firearms charges. One key section of the indictment involved King Abdullah's 2005 visit to Moyock, during which the monarch was presented a Bushmaster M4 rifle, a Remington shotgun and three Glock handguns.

The gift guns were a marketing device, part of an effort by Blackwater to land security and training contracts in Jordan, the indictment alleges.

When the executives subsequently realized they were unable to account for the disposition of the weapons, prosecutors allege, they falsified reports to the U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives to give the appearance that they had purchased the guns for their own personal use.

Contrary to prosecutors' claims, the former executives now say the king's visit to Moyock "was not a Blackwater marketing effort, but was instead a CIA-organized and CIA-sanctioned diplomatic event attended by dozens of U.S. Government officials with the aim not of increasing Blackwater's potential profits, but instead of furthering relations between the two countries." [Read more: Sizemore/TheVirginianPilot/2June2012]

Loose Lips and the Obama National Security Ship. The level of detail spilling out through media reports about crucial national security operations is raising the question of whether President Barack Obama's administration can keep a secret - or in some cases even wants to.

In just the past week, two tell-all articles about Obama's leadership as commander-in-chief have been published, dripping with insider details about his sleeves-rolled-up involvement in choosing terrorist targets for drone strikes and revelations about his amped-up cyber war on Iran.

Each article notes the reporters spoke to "current and former" American officials and presidential advisers, as well as sources from other countries.

"This is unbelievable ... absolutely stunning," a former senior intelligence official said about the level of detail contained in the cyberattack story.

The official noted that the article cited participants in sensitive White House meetings who then told the reporter about top secret discussions. The article "talks about President Obama giving direction for a cyberweapons attack during a time of peace against a United Nations member state."

The article follows on the heels of what many considered dangerous leaking of details about a mole who helped foil a plot by al Qaeda in Yemen. The revelations of the British national threatened what was described at the time as an ongoing operation.

"The leak really did endanger sources and methods," Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-California and chair of the Intelligence Committee, told Fox News.

The Yemen plot had many intelligence and national security officials flummoxed and angered by its public airing. Despite that, a senior administration official then briefed network counterterrorism analysts, including CNN's Frances Townsend, about parts of the operation. [Read more: Levine/CNN/1June2012]

American General in South Korea Replaced After Spy Report. The Pentagon has replaced the commander of United States Special Forces in South Korea after a media report quoted him as saying that American and South Korean troops have been parachuting into North Korea on spy missions, a statement denied by Washington and the government in Seoul. 

Brig. Gen. Neil H. Tolley's departure as commanding general of the Special Operations Command Korea, a job he held since October 2010, was part of "routine" rotations of jobs and had "nothing to do with" the media report, said a spokesman of the American military in Seoul, speaking Tuesday on customary condition of anonymity.

Last week, The Diplomat, a Japan-based foreign affairs magazine, quoted General Tolley as telling a defense industry conference in Tampa, Fla., on May 22 that American and South Korean soldiers have been dropped behind North Korean lines to spy on North Korea's vast network of underground military facilities.

"The entire tunnel infrastructure is hidden from our satellites," he was quoted as saying. "So we send ROK soldiers and U.S. soldiers to the North to do special reconnaissance." ROK is a shorthand for South Korea's official name, Republic of Korea.

The United States Defense Department and the American military in South Korea quickly denied the report. In a statement, they said the report had "taken great liberal license with his comments and taken him completely out of context."

"Quotes have been made up and attributed to him," their statement said.

In a later "clarification statement," however, General Tolley said, "After further review of the reporting, I feel I was accurately quoted." [Read more: Sang-Hun/NYTimes/5June2012]

VAFB Reconnaissance Office Gets Awards. On the heels of a busy string of launches, members of the National Reconnaissance Office captured multiple honors during an annual awards luncheon Thursday at Vandenberg Air Force Base.

The event, which has taken place for the past 28 years for the Robert H. Goddard Chapter of the Air Force Association, drew some 300 people to the Pacific Coast Club on base.

"For the past 28 years, the Goddard Chapter has sponsored annual awards for outstanding Vandenberg personnel and organizations that made significant contributions to the Air Force," said retired Master Sgt. Peter Caputo, AFA awards vice president.

The multiple honors prompted Caputo to make a joke to NRO's local leader, Lt. Col. Eric J. Kolb.

"Sir, we can get you a seat right here if you'd like," Caputo said, pointing to an empty chair near the front of the room.

The agency, whose existence was secret until declassification in 1992, marked its 50th anniversary in 2010-11 with a string of six launches. Four of those occurred from Vandenberg and included the inaugural Delta 4-Heavy rocket launch from the West Coast. NRO is responsible for designing, building and operating the nation's spy satellites.

Several chapter awards also were handed out Thursday including some recognizing local youths. [Read more: Scully/SantaMariaTimes/1June2012]

Retired Russian Colonel Convicted of Spying for US. A retired Russian military officer has been convicted on charges of spying for the U.S. and sentenced to 12 years in prison, the counterintelligence agency said Thursday, the latest in a raft of espionage cases that come amid tensions between Moscow and Washington.

A court has ruled that retired Col. Vladimir Lazar will be sent to a high-security prison and stripped of his military rank, the Federal Security Service, or FSB, said in a statement.

Prosecutors said Lazar purchased several computer disks with more than 7,000 images of classified maps of Russia from a collector in 2008 and smuggled them to neighboring Belarus, where he gave them to an alleged American intelligence agent.

The FSB said the maps could be used for planning military operations against Russia. Lazar had served with the General Staff of the Russian armed forces in Moscow before his retirement in the early 2000s.

The FSB did not specify when the Moscow City Court's verdict and sentence were handed down. Prosecutors first reported charges against Lazar in April. Russian state television broadcast brief footage from the courtroom, showing the gray-haired, bespectacled Lazar sitting in a cage. [Read more: AP/1June2012]

Sheila Jackson Lee Misspeaks, Seems To Out Undercover CIA Agent. Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee (D-Texas) appeared for a moment to have revealed the name of an undercover CIA agent on Thursday when she mistakenly conflated the man and his station chief, whose identity is not a secret.

During a floor speech in support of hiring more minorities in the Central Intelligence Agency, Jackson Lee talked about Garrett Jones, who she said "served as a CIA station chief in Somalia during peacekeeping operations in 1993."

"He was cited as an African American officer who was able to work undercover for weeks in north Mogadishu, which he said would have - his duty officers said - would have all but been impossible by Jones' other officers," she continued. "We all have a contribution to make, and I look forward to this sense of Congress not being weeded out in conference and re-emphasizing the importance of this effort."

Of course, if Jones had been an undercover agent, stating his name on the floor of the House of Representatives could have been damaging, as the speeches go on television and in the congressional record.

Luckily, Jones' identity is not a secret. He is now retired from the CIA, and penned op-eds in the Los Angeles Times in 2006 about his time running covert operations in Mogadishu.

A few minutes after her comments, Jackson Lee seemed to realize her mistake, and stood up again to say she did not actually reveal the agent's name. [Read more: Foley/HuffingtonPost/31May2012]

Lawmakers Nudge Spy Agencies into Anti-Drug Fight on US Public Land. The nation's spy agencies are drawn deeper into the fight against illegal-drug production on U.S. public land under an intelligence bill that the House of Representatives approved Thursday.

Pushed by lawmakers from California, where Mexico-based gangs use parks and national forests for nefarious purposes, the bill makes permanent a one-time study initiated last year. Now the overseer of the nation's sprawling intelligence community will have to report annually on actions against "international drug-trafficking organizations" that exploit public land.

"The local folks need all the help they can get," Rep. Mike Thompson, D-Calif., a member of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, said in an interview. "Every day, there's a new reason for concern."

The bill still must go through the Senate and be signed by the president; no obstacles are apparent.

The potentially affected public lands include more than 444 million acres managed by the Interior Department and 193 million acres managed by the Forest Service across the country.

Western states, in particular, have become notorious for marijuana and methamphetamine production in national forests and on other public land. More than 77,000 acres in California are used to grow marijuana, according to a 2010 estimate from the Central Valley High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area program. Nationwide, 2.3 million marijuana plants were reported destroyed on Forest Service land in fiscal 2011, a decrease from previous years.

Many of the workers, moreover, are foreign-born and undocumented, reflecting what U.S. officials say is the dominant role played by Mexico-based gangsters. Of 2,334 marijuana sites seized in national forests in California from 2005 to 2010, 1,437 were being tended by illegal immigrants, according to the Forest Service. [Read more: Doyle/McClatchy/31May2012]


Section II - CONTEXT & PRECEDENCE

This Rock Could Spy on You for Decades. America is supposed to wind down its war in Afghanistan by 2014. But U.S. forces may continue to track Afghans for years after the conflict is officially done. Palm-sized sensors, developed for the American military, will remain littered across the Afghan countryside - detecting anyone who moves nearby and reporting their locations back to a remote headquarters. Some of these surveillance tools could be buried in the ground, all-but-unnoticeable by passersby. Others might be disguised as rocks, with wafer-sized, solar-rechargeable batteries that could enable the sensors' operation for perhaps as long as two decades, if their makers are to be believed.

Traditionally, when armies clash, they leave behind a horrific legacy: leftover mines which can blow civilians apart long after the shooting war is over. These "unattended ground sensors," or UGSs, won't do that kind of damage. But they could give the Pentagon an enduring ability to monitor a one-time battlefield long, long after regular American forces are supposed to have returned home.

"Were going to leave behind a lot of special operators in Afghanistan. And they need the kind of capability that's easy to put out so they can monitor a village without a lot of overt U.S.-made material on pathways and roadways," says Matt Plyburn, an executive at Lockheed Martin, the world's largest defense contractor.

The U.S. military has used unattended ground sensors in one form or another since 1966, when American forces dropped acoustic monitors on the Ho Chi Minh trail. Tens of thousands of UGSs have been emplaced around Afghanistan and Iraq, forming electronic perimeters around combat outposts and keeping tabs on remote locations. It's a way to monitor the largest possible area with the smallest number of troops.

"You use them to cover up your dead space - the areas you're concerned about but can't cover with other ISR [intelligence surveillance and reconnaissance] assets," says Lt. Col. Matt Russell, an Army program manager overseeing the deployment of unattended sensors. [Read more: Shachtman/Wired/29May2012]

Understanding Cyberspace is Key to Defending Against Digital Attacks. Charlie Miller prepared his cyberattack in a bedroom office at his Midwestern suburban home.

Brilliant and boyish-looking, Miller has a PhD in math from the University of Notre Dame and spent five years at the National Security Agency, where he secretly hacked into foreign computer systems for the U.S. government. Now, he was turning his attention to the Apple iPhone.

At just 5 ounces and 4 1/2 inches long, the iPhone is an elegant computing powerhouse. Its microscopic transistors and millions of lines of code enable owners to make calls, send e-mail, take photos, listen to music, play games and conduct business, almost simultaneously. Nearly 200 million iPhones have been sold around the world.

The idea of a former cyberwarrior using his talents to hack a wildly popular consumer device might seem like a lark. But his campaign, aimed at winning a little-known hacker contest last year, points to a paradox of our digital age. The same code that unleashed a communications revolution has also created profound vulnerabilities for societies that depend on code for national security and economic survival.

Miller's iPhone offensive showed how anything connected to networks these days can be a target.

He began by connecting his computer to another laptop holding the same software used by the iPhone. Then he typed a command to launch a program that randomly changed data in a file being processed by the software.

The alteration might be as mundane as inserting 58 for F0 in a string of data such as "0F 00 04 F0." His plan was to constantly launch such random changes, cause the software to crash, then figure out why the substitutions triggered a problem. A software flaw could open a door and let him inside.

"I know I can do it," Miller, now a cybersecurity consultant, told himself. "I can hack anything."

After weeks of searching, he found what he was looking for: a "zero day," a vulnerability in the software that has never been made public and for which there is no known fix.

The door was open, and Miller was about to walk through. [Read more: O'Harrow/WashingtonPost/2June2012]

David Petraeus's First Year at the CIA. CIA Director David Petraeus spoke first at an April 19 memorial dinner for agency officers killed in action. He delivered well-scripted remarks and an evocation of the agency's heroes. Then came Leon Panetta, his predecessor at the CIA and the evening's main honoree, who delivered a stem-winding emotional speech to fervent applause.

The freewheeling Panetta, now secretary of defense, has been a tough act to follow at the CIA, especially for a former four-star Army general who thrived in the disciplined, resource-rich world of the military. And in his first year at the agency, Petraeus's transition has sometimes been bumpy, as the CIA's finicky workforce struggled to adapt to its new director. 

"I hear the rumblings" from mid-level CIA officers, says one senior administration official. But he says Petraeus gets high marks from the White House, which took the unusual step of naming the prominent general to the post.

An assessment of Petraeus as he nears completion of his first year as CIA director echoes these themes. It's been a big change, from commanding vast U.S. military forces in Iraq, Centcom and Afghanistan to the smaller and sometimes haphazard CIA. His personal staff shrank from 50 to six.

Petraeus also gave up one of the most visible media profiles in America - the iconic man in uniform - for a civilian job in the shadows, with the Obama White House insisting that its intelligence chief stay out of the news.

The bottom line is performance, and here Petraeus gets good marks both from his senior colleagues and the administration. One senior CIA officer who has served under 11 directors thinks performance is especially high now because Petraeus is driving the organization to produce - even at the cost of frustrating some subordinates.

An example is Petraeus's reorganization of the CIA's famously bad system of career development. In place of a tepid, in-house system, he wanted something closer to the Army's mid-career training, which allowed Petraeus to earn a Ph.D. at Princeton. Soon after arriving at Langley, he set to work creating a similar opportunity for the CIA's rising leaders.

This fall, the first six "Director's Scholars" will head off for a year at top Ivy League universities, with an eventual goal of 20 to 25 such slots. [Read more: Ignatius/WashingtonPost/1June2012]

Navy Marks Battle of Midway's 70th Anniversary. Six months after the devastating attack on Pearl Harbor, Japan sent four aircraft carriers to the tiny Pacific atoll of Midway to draw out and destroy what remained of the U.S. Pacific Fleet.

But this time the U.S. knew about Japan's plans. U.S. cryptologists had cracked Japanese communications codes, giving Fleet Commander Adm. Chester Nimitz notice of where Japan would strike, the day and time of the attack, and what ships the enemy would bring to the fight.

The U.S. was badly outnumbered and its pilots less experienced than Japan's. Even so, it sank four Japanese aircraft carriers the first day of the three-day battle and put Japan on the defensive, greatly diminishing its ability to project air power as it had in the attack on Hawaii.

On Monday, current Pacific Fleet commander, Adm. Cecil Haney and other officials flew 1,300 miles northwest from Oahu to Midway to mark the 70th anniversary of the pivotal battle that changed the course of the Pacific war.

"Historians are still writing about it, military planners are still studying it, and we cherish the opportunity to commemorate it," Haney said.

Midway is now a National Wildlife Refuge hosting more than one million seabirds. Navy photos of the ceremony show an honor guard standing at attention next to a field of ground-nesting Laysan albatross and other seabirds.

Haney and two veterans from the battle were among 150 people at the ceremony, which included releasing leis and flower petals in a small boat to honor those who died in the battle.

The veterans also took part in a ribbon-cutting for an exhibit at the refuge memorializing the battle.

"After the battle of Midway we always maintained the initiative and for the remaining three years of the war, the Japanese reacted to us," Vice Adm. Michael Rogers, commander of the U.S. Fleet Cyber Command, told a crowd gathered outside Nimitz's old office at Pearl Harbor on Friday to commemorate the role naval intelligence played in the events of June 4-7, 1942.

"It all started really in May of 1942 with station Hypo (the Combat Intelligence Unit at Pearl Harbor) and the work of some great people working together to try to understand what were the Japanese thinking, what were they going to do," Rogers said Friday.

Intelligence wasn't the only reason for U.S. victory. [Read more: McAvoy/AP/4June2012]

Jacksonville's New FBI leader is Rising Star in Agency. On his first day at work, Mike Steinbach sat at a Chicago Denny's drinking coffee, reading a newspaper and covertly protecting a nearby federal witness from a possible hit attempt by the mob.

"I thought, 'Holy moly.' This is a pretty good deal," Steinbach said. "I knew I had made the right [career] choice."

The undercover surveillance assignment was Steinbach's welcome to the FBI.

Seventeen years later, after adding the capture of a serial killer, an interview with a 9/11 facilitator and breaking bread with Israelis and Palestinians to his many accomplishments, Steinbach has arrived in Jacksonville.

The 45-year-old father of four is in his first month as the special agent in charge of the FBI's Jacksonville division, whose 225 special agents and support staff cover 40 of the state's 67 counties from the First Coast to the Panhandle and into Central Florida.

The rising star brings with him a love and appreciation for street work, a gift for gab and a reputation for being a sharp leader who gets it when it comes to protecting the community and supporting his shop.

"He'll do the right thing by his people," said retired FBI agent John Hess, who worked with Steinbach and is a friend. "Mike's done what they're doing. He's not going to dictate to others something he wouldn't do or hasn't done already."

Steinbach has worked with and managed groups that have hunted violent criminals and terrorists. He has also led parts of the agency involved in coordinating domestic and foreign intelligence gathering, worked with the military to shore up its counterterrorism operations in foreign countries and managed FBI international terrorism investigations inside the United States. [Read more: FloridaTimesUnion/31May2012]

Vintage CIA Training Videos Teach You To Stalk Like A Pro. It's easy to forget that car following and trailing is a dying art. Thanks to easy-to-hide GPS tracking devices, this sort of skill is likely to vanish, like knowing how to make jodhpurs from a couple gophers or something. These videos, CIA-branded but shot in Britain and staffed with all British actors, both of the human and car variety (perhaps an MI-6 collaboration) give some great, basic instruction on car-following.

The key seems to be, of course, don't let the mark see you. According to the CIA way, the best way to accomplish that is to work in a team, in this case of three cars. There's lots of map-reading involved, extrapolating most likely exit routes of your target, and constant radio communication between the pursuing cars.

Not often do we get to peek behind the curtain to learn the wizard's tricks. But now we get to see the cloak and dagger training that the CIA gives agents to follow targets. Of course, the fact that this film came from the National Archives and not passed along by some shadowy trench coat in a parking garage means the CIA has likely updated its tactics over the last four decades. [Read more: Jalopnik/Autominded/30May2012]


Section III - COMMENTARY

Why Uri Blau's Indictment Should Worry Every Journalist in Israel. A few years ago I visited the Stasi Museum in Berlin. The tour through the once highly secretive and secure building of East Germany's Ministry for State Security was fascinating, even if a little hilarious.

Not only did the crude and sometimes obvious gadgets used for spying on citizens and officials make me wonder how the people of that former country put up with its leaders for so long, but it also shed light on the clearly paranoid and extreme techniques some regimes use to stay in power.

According to our museum tour guide, Stasi officers knew no limits and had no shame when it came to protecting the party and the state. They used ruthless and intimidating methods to keep the people in line and frequently manipulated the press or suppressed freedom of information, all in the name of state security.

That visit came to mind this week when news broke in Israel on Wednesday that friend and colleague Haaretz journalist Uri Blau is to be indicted by Attorney General Yehuda Weinstein for unauthorized possession of classified materials. Even though the charges fall short of fully blown espionage, in announcing his decision Weinstein admitted that the indictment comes under an "aggravated espionage" clause in the law.

Espionage, classified documents, targeted killings (which was the subject matter that Blau revealed in the incriminating article he published back in November 2008) and possible jail time that a young Israeli journalist now faces, is suddenly more than just an eerie reminder of what I had learned about East Germany's repressive regime.

Until Wednesday, I always believed that Israeli journalists - when it comes to doing our jobs like we should - had it pretty easy compared colleagues in countries across Africa, Eastern Europe, Asia and elsewhere in the Middle East. Even though access to information in this country is sometimes censored under the "state security" clause, as far as government-promoted aggression and threatening behavior towards the media goes, we have never really faced a problem.

In light of Blau's indictment, it is now possible that this comfortable reality could change. [Read more: Eglash/HuffingtonPost/1June2012]

Strength in the Shadows: A Tribute to the CIA and Navy SEALs. Fleet Adm. Chester Nimitz, who commanded U.S. forces in the Pacific Theater during World War II, said "uncommon valor was a common virtue" among American troops in the bloody battle with Japanese forces for the island of Iwo Jima.

Those words uttered some six decades ago in the final year of a global conflict are no less true today for those involved in guarding our national security, as America finds itself enduring more than a decade of conflict overseas.

And while Americans came to know several of the heroes of Iwo Jima, perhaps most notably through the photo of the Marines raising the American flag on Mount Suribachi, today some of America's wars are being fought by those whose names and faces may never be publicly known because of their decision to embark on careers where exploits on behalf of an unknowing nation must remain cloaked in secrecy. Indeed, these heroes' feats of skill and bravery may never be known even to their families.

Of all those unapplauded, no national security organization gets less credit - and more public blame when they err - than the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), which conducts both intelligence analysis and operations.

To enhance their effectiveness as well as their safety and that of their families, many of its officers live their personal and professional lives under "cover" - with their actual employer unknown to those outside their immediate family.

This "code of silence" has resulted in no shortage of interesting anecdotes from now-grown children who never knew that mom or dad worked for the CIA all those years until the parent made a deathbed confession. Some take their lives as spies to the grave, leaving a surviving spouse to tell to the "kids" the story of mom or dad's life as an undercover agent.

Of course, when people join "The Company," they do it knowing full well that they will get no public credit for their important work. Their triumphs may only be known to just a handful of colleagues if others inside CIA headquarters in Langley do not have the "need to know."

But these shadow warriors are in many cases working alongside their military counterparts in combat zones like Afghanistan, gathering important information or chasing terrorists. .....

Like the CIA, Navy SEALs (and other special operators) live out of the limelight, never asking for - or expecting - public recognition for the difficult and dangerous work they do in peace and war for U.S. national defense.

But in the past few years, the curtain has, on occasion, pulled back ever so slightly on the SEALs' involvement in some awe-inspiring military operations.

There was, for example, the SEAL rescue of the American captain of the U.S.-registered cargo ship Maersk Alabama, which was hijacked in the Gulf of Aden in April 2009 by modern-day Somali pirates.

According to news reports, after storming the Maersk Alabama but failing to gain control of the vessel, the pirates left the freighter in one of its lifeboats with the ship's captain. A Navy destroyer, the USS Bainbridge, was dispatched to the scene to monitor and respond to events.

Navy SEALs stationed in the region, including some crack snipers, were reportedly parachuted into the Gulf of Aden in the vicinity of Bainbridge and came aboard, while negotiations for the release of the hostage continued with the pirates.

Sensing the captain's life was in danger, the Navy's on-scene commander ordered SEAL sharpshooters into action. They killed three pirates in the bobbing lifeboat from the pitching fantail of Bainbridge with one simultaneous volley of three shots.

Of course, Americans never saw the faces or knew the names of the SEALs involved in this rescue. Not surprisingly, the same is true for the SEAL team which was called on to hunt down Public Enemy No. 1: Osama bin Laden. [Read more: Brookes/Townhall/June2012]

Inside the Navy's Newest Spy Sub. The Navy's newest fast-attack submarine is speeding down the Florida coast, on its way to its commissioning ceremony in its namesake state, at 15 knots. And it's getting outraced by dolphins.

Hours before the U.S.S. Mississippi dives several hundred feet beneath the Atlantic, its sail juts proudly into the warm, whipping southern air. Submariners allow me to see the highest point on the sub for myself - provided I can keep my balance up three steep levels' worth of ladder and hoist myself out onto a platform the size of a fancy refrigerator. A harness hooked to an iron bolt on the sail keeps me from falling to my death. There's no land in sight, just blue water turned white around the sub's wake, a tall BPS-16 military radar spinning in front of us, and a family of dolphins jumping out of the surf in front of the 377-foot boat.

Apparently it's typical. Where subs travel in the southern Atlantic, dolphins tend to tag along, eager to say hi to their large, silent playmate. "Dolphins like to sing," notes Petty Officer Joshua Bardelon, a 32-year old from Pascagoula, the site of the Mississippi's destination, who supervises the boat's sonar systems.

Those systems are part of why Navy Secretary Ray Mabus is eager to take possession of his newest Virginia-class submarine when it formally joins the fleet on June 2. As much time as it spends listening to dolphin symphonies, the Mississippi is everything from a weapon to destroy other ships to an electronic-attack system to a stealthy transport for Navy commandos.

The multiple sonar arrays allow the submarine to detect other ships before it's detected itself. Underway, the boat is dead silent except for the hum of the air conditioning, an indication of the classified tools that mask the Mississippi's acoustic and electronic signatures to maintain its exceptional stealth. Then comes the boat's electronic warfare capabilities - which its crew will discuss only vaguely.

"If I'm at periscope depth and I stick my periscope out of the water, people who are looking for me will be using a radar system to find me," says the sub's commander, Capt. John McGrath, a 20-year submarine veteran. "But I will know that that radar is in the area and I will use that to my advantage." [Read more: Ackerman/Wired/30May2012]


Section IV - Books and Documentaries, Letters to the Editors and Coming Events


Books and Documentaries

New Book Claims President Obama Ordered Stuxnet Attack on Iran. In the upcoming book, "Confront and Conceal: Obama's Secret Wars and Surprising Use of American Power," sources tie Stuxnet to an effort by the NSA and a secret Israeli military unit to disrupt Iran's nuclear ambitions.

U.S. President Barack Obama ordered the use of Stuxnet against Iran as part of an effort to disrupt the country's nuclear ambitions, according to The New York Times.

In a story adapted from an upcoming book by New York Times Chief Washington Correspondent David Sanger, anonymous sources are quoted as saying that Obama accelerated plans for a cyber-attack against Iran that were first started during the administration of George W. Bush.

According to The Times, Obama decided to continue the attacks after Stuxnet became public in the summer of 2010 due to a "programming error that allowed it to escape" Iran's nuclear enrichment plant in Natanz.

According to The Times, when Obama was told it was unclear how much the Iranians knew about the code and it was still causing problems, the president decided the cyber-attacks should proceed. In the subsequent weeks, the Natanz plant was hit by two newer versions of the computer worm, with the last of that series of attacks temporarily taking out nearly 1,000 of the 5,000 centrifuges Iran was using for purifying uranium.

The paper reports that for years, the CIA had introduced faulty parts and designs into Iran's systems, for example, sabotaging imported power supplies so that they would blow up, but their efforts had produced little results. The failures prompted Gen. James E. Cartwright, who had established a cyber-operation within the U.S. Strategic Command to present then-President George W. Bush and his national security team with the idea of a cyber-weapon. The result was an effort code-named Olympic Games.

The effort involved the National Security Agency (NSA) and a secret Israeli military unit known as Unit 8200, The Times reported.

"Previous cyber-attacks had effects limited to other computers," former CIA Chief Michael V. Hayden told The Times, though he declined to say what he knew of the attacks when he was in office. "This is the first attack of a major nature in which a cyber-attack was used to effect physical destruction." [Read more: Prince/eWeek/1June2012]

CIA Memoirs Offer Revelations and Settle Scores Among Spies. In between his defense of secret prisons, coercive interrogations of al-Qaeda suspects and the shredding of highly sensitive videotapes, former CIA spymaster Jose A. Rodriguez Jr. makes room in his memoir "Hard Measures" to talk about the competition: other CIA memoirists.

These days, there are just so many of them - and so much controversy surrounding them. One measure of the fallout: The CIA is conducting an internal investigation to determine whether some spy memoirs are being censored merely to scrub out embarrassing details about the agency, rather than to protect against the release of classified information. But the CIA doesn't seem to mind letting former officers praise or slam one another. 

In "Hard Measures," Rodriguez, 63, a Northern Virginian who retired from the agency five years ago, plugs another hot new CIA memoir, "The Art of Intelligence," published in May by former agency officer Henry A. Crumpton. But Rodriguez also settled some spy scores. Without deigning to utter his rivals' names or book titles, Rodriguez pilloried "The Interrogator," a 2011 memoir by ex-CIA operative Glenn L. Carle, and "The Reluctant Spy," written in 2009 by former agency man John Kiriakou. Rodriguez believes his fellow ex-spies unfairly tainted harsh interrogation tactics - such as waterboarding - that he championed.

"[G]reat pretenders," the memoirist labels his opposing memoirists.

The proliferation of CIA memoirs has been fueled by the public's appetite for insider accounts into the country's war on terrorism - real-life versions of popular shows such as "Homeland." The books often command six-figure advances, generate headlines and propel their authors onto network television shows.

"There's never been more interest in the work of the CIA [from publishing houses] as there has been in the last decade," said Bill Harlow, the former CIA spokesman from 1997 to 2004, who co-wrote Rodriguez's memoir as well as former CIA director George Tenet's opus, "At the Center of the Storm," in 2007.

While not exactly written in the mold of John Le Carré, the memoirs unspool secrets not easily obtainable under the Freedom of Information Act. Tales about recruiting informants or office gamesmanship at Langley often find their way past the agency's Publications Review Board, which reviews ex-employees' books and redacts classified details.

"In many cases, they are providing the only account there is, and people read the memoirs to flesh out a sparse public record," said Steven Aftergood, editor of the Federation of American Scientists Secrecy News and a CIA memoir enthusiast. "Now, these authors are competing for control of a certain historical narrative, when even the meanings of 'torture' and 'terrorism' are contested. These [CIA memoirists] are trying to define those meanings and write the first drafts of history." [Read more: Shapira/WashingtonPost/4June2012]

Group Seeks To Produce Documentary on Life of OSS Veterans, their Families, the Intel Community, and the Special Forces

"We are producing a documentary on the history, people and legacy of the OSS. The documentary is meant to record and memorialize the life of OSS veterans, their families and those that have come after them to serve in the intelligence community and special operations forces. We would like to interview as many OSS veterans as possible. If you are a veteran or if you are the family member of a veteran, email us at info@civilianveteran.org. We are happy to send any materials on the documentary [AFIO has placed PDF about documentary at this link], including a more extensive summary. Most of the people trying to put this documentary together are intelligence community, military, and special operations forces veterans. We intend to show the documentary to as wide an audience as possible in order to promote the history of the OSS and we intend to donate profits to relevant charities. Please contact us at info@civilianveteran.org or call Anthony Vinci at (703) 594-1637."


Letters to the Editors

European Bee-Eater Accused of Espionage. Having an interest in birds since the age of 6, I plead that we leave our avian friends out of the complex issues involved in international espionage...please? Birds have become so much a part of my life that it makes me mad as a wet hen when they're wrongly accused of things. A recent AFIO WIN article ruffled my feathers- the Turkish Intelligence Services accused the European Bee-Eater bird of being a 007 spy.

How much crow can one eat? Being a bird lover, I was initially upset, but I eventually thought the incident amounted to mere chicken feed. I make frequent contacts with various professional ornithologists, including one who is retired from his senior researcher position at the Smithsonian Institution. I visit them often in NW Pennsylvania, and observe them attach GPS geo-locators on purple martins and other bird species, to track their migratory patterns. The purple martins annually migrate to Brazil and back and many have geo-locator attached to them.

Thank goodness purple martins don't fly over Turkey, less they be shot out of the sky with anti-aircraft fire! How chicken-livered can one be? Is Israel's Mossad training them to fly into jet aircraft engines?

Actually, I was quite amused at this bird-brained espionage claim leveled at Israel for creating a spy bird out of the European Bee-Eater. A little bird told me [AFIO's WIN] that Turkish authorities believe the dead bird found by a Turkish farmer in a field may have been conducting covert surveillance for Israel. I guess they thought it was getting a "bird's eye" view of their country. Yes, a European Bee-Eater was discovered by the Turkish farmer wearing a band on its leg with the word "Israel" written on it. This "crazy as a loon" claim is ironic, for my ornithology buddies in NW Pa. also tag their GPS geo-locators with identification tags.

Turkish Intel wears an albatross around its neck, for it is far from being as wise as an owl when connecting the espionage dots. It was duck soup to them...just look at the evidence! The bird had "unusually large nostrils," leading to their speculation that it was implanted with a surveillance device and sent to Turkey on an aerial espionage mission. The bird's remains were handed over to the Turkish Agriculture Ministry, which then turned them over to Ankara's security services. What a wild goose chase!

News of the feathered arrest spread to Israel, where the Society of Protection of Nature was eventually alerted. The group confirmed that the bird was banded about four years ago for research purposes.

Turkish authorities apparently count their chickens before they hatch in such "chicken and egg" situations. They should be professionals and analyze incoming-intelligence with methodical expertise...not like bird brains! "They can rest easy...it's not a spy", said Yoav Pearlman of the Israeli Birdwatching Center to Ynet News on Tuesday. The bizarre development follows a series of weird espionage allegations leveled at Israel by Iran, Egypt and Saudi Arabia in recent years... birds of a feather, do indeed, flock together. Can't the IC take them under their wings and teach them the intelligence analysis process...so they quit winging it all the time?!

Saudi Arabia appeared as silly as a goose when it announced in January 2011 that it "detained" a bird wearing an Israeli identification band. The bird was carrying a GPS transmitter from Tel Aviv University. OSINT News would like to thank Saudi Arabia for aiding Israeli ornithologists in their scientific quest to better understand the migratory patterns of our avian friends. At least the Tel Aviv University researchers gained some tracking information on the migratory habits of the particular species they were studying, even though it was labeled a "Zionist espionage plot". What a conclusion based on evidence as scarce as hen's teeth...was Saudi Arabian intelligence trying to kill two birds with one stone?

Even Iran laid an egg when they accused Israel of enlisting pigeons to spy on their nuclear sites. Were these 007 pigeons conducting some sort of "coo"? Will all the pigeons perching and relieving themselves atop the hundreds of statues of Iranian leaders be shot for "defacing and disrespecting" the mullahs? I hope these allegations are only a swan song.

The chickens are coming home to roost! Turkey's intelligence service used Israel's ornithology research project to feather its own nest. I'm proud as a peacock that this incident upsets the global birding community. Their anger won't disappear like water off a duck's back. Geolocators are placed on all kinds of endangered bird species in many countries.

So, it's time to talk turkey...I plead for you all to get your ducks in a row and keep our avian friends clear of international espionage issues. What's good for the goose is good for the gander, so let's all learn from Turkey's intel egg-in-the-face mistake and not foul our own nests by clipping the wings off the world's ornithology research.

Well, I must go. I am driving to NW Pa. to help researchers study purple martins. It's a good 4-hour drive, even as the crow flies, so I must be off. I feel as free as a bird and as happy as a lark when I visit them. 

Robert Morton, M.Ed., Ed.S.
Member AFIO


Coming Educational Events

EDUCATIONAL EVENTS IN COMING TWO MONTHS....

MANY Spy Museum Events in June, July, and beyond, with full details are listed on the AFIO Website at www.afio.com. The titles for some of these are in detail below and online.

Friday, 1 June 2012 - Tysons Corner, VA - AFIO Summer Luncheon featuring former Director, CIA NCS Jose A Rodriguez plus Latin America/Caribbean CIA expert, Brian Latell.

Register now for this special -- and, for a few, controversial -- AFIO Summer Luncheon which features former CIA National Clandestine Service Director Jose A. Rodriguez, Jr. on his long-anticipated book: HARD MEASURES: How Aggressive CIA Actions After 9/11 Saved American Lives, co-authored with Bill Harlow [author, former Director of the Office of Public Affairs, CIA], and Morning speaker: Distinguished former CIA Latin America/Caribbean expert, author of - Castro's Secrets: The CIA and Cuba's Intelligence Machine, Brian Latell, Ph.D.. Register NOW for this Special Event.

2 June 2012 - Monterey, CA - 70th Anniversary of Battle of Midway, Naval Postgraduate School

Reservations are now being accepted for the 70th Anniversary of the Battle of Midway Dining-Out at the Naval Postgraduate School on Saturday 2 June. This annual event is led by the NPS Student Council in coordination with the Monterey Bay Commander of the Naval Order of the United States, the Monterey Peninsula Council of the Navy League. The honoree President of the Mess is Vice Admiral Dan Oliver, USN (Ret), President of the Naval Postgraduate School, the President of the Mess is Captain Gerral David, USN, Commanding Officer, Naval Support Activity Monterey, and LT Ryan Birkelbach, USN is Mr. Vice. The guest speaker will be Admiral Gary Roughead, the 29th Chief of Naval Operations.

The 2012 Midway theme is the "Priceless Advantage: Winning the Battles of Coral Sea, Midway and the Aleutians with Communications Intelligence" and will focus on past, present, and future issues in communications intelligence, cryptanalytics, lingusitics, and information analysis to support decision making.
Admiral Roughead is currently the Annenberg Distinguished Visiting Fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University. He was an early leader establishing social media tools in the Navy, creating the Information Dominance and Assurance programs, the Navy Cyber Command, and standing up the Navy's 10th Fleet at Fort George G. Meade.
You might find it useful to read the history of winning Midway by a National Security Agency historian, Dr. Frederick D. Parker " A Priceless Advantage." The NSA Midway communications intelligence history download address is: http://1.usa.gov/L4aIia
A principal figure who led the OP20G team at Pearl Harbor 14th Naval District breaking the Imperial Japanese Navy code JN-25 and assembling sufficient intelligence to reveal the plans of the Japanese fleet was LCDR Joe Rochefort - he was the direct interface to the Pacific Fleet Commander Admiral Nimitz at the Combat Intelligence Center aka Station H or "HYPO". Supporting Rochefort was a young Navy Ensign, Donald "Mac" Showers who arrived in February 1942. Admiral Showers retired in 1971 as Director of Naval Intelligence, then spent another 12 years at the CIA on special assignments to the director. Our access to an eye-witness of this caliber, the only one still alive, is well beyond our expectations.
A special DVD will be produced which features Adm Mac Showers, now 92, who retired in 1971 as Director of Naval Intelligence, then spent 12 yrs at CIA. He will give his personal account of what happened during Midway. Dr. Summers has worked with most of the key parties involved in the code breaking operations at Pearl Harbor in 1942 to produce an outstanding documentary.
To register: http://www.nps.edu/midway/
Reservations are now being taken and know you will want to reserve a place at this historic event!
Upon making your reservations, your names will be added to the gate security access list.
Contact Captain Ken Johnson, USN (Ret.), 2012 Battle of Midway Team Coordinator nousmtyken@sbcglobal.net and 831-657-9793 for further details.

Tuesday, 12 June 2012, noon – 1:00 pm – Washington, DC - "The Art of Intelligence: Lessons from a Life in the CIA's Clandestine Service" at the International Spy Museum

In the days after 9/11, the CIA directed Henry Crumpton to organize and lead its covert action campaign in Afghanistan. Even at the height of combat against the Taliban in late 2001, there were fewer than five hundred Americans on the ground in Afghanistan. This group, a dynamic blend of CIA and Special Forces operators, assisted by only a few allied troops, managed to rout al Qaeda and the Taliban in less than 90 days after the Twin Towers fell. The Art of Intelligence draws from the full arc of Crumpton's espionage and covert action exploits to explain what America's spies do and why their service is more valuable than ever. Crumpton's enthralling story, covering his early years in Africa, to his liaison assignment at the FBI, his work at the CIA's Counterterrorism Center where he was involved in the development of the Predator UAV program, and his later work running all CIA clandestine operations inside the United States, has much to teach us about national security and love of country.
WHERE: International Spy Museum: 800 F Street, NW Washington, DC Gallery Place/Chinatown Metrorail Station
Free! No registration required! Directions at www.spymuseum.org

Wednesday, 13 June 2012, 1000-1130 - Annapolis Junction, MD - "The Camouflage Project" - part of the NCMF Cryptologic Program Series

The Ohio State University Drama Department's Theatrical Exhibition Team will perform The Camouflage Project as part of the National Cryptologic Museum Foundation's Cryptologic Program Series.
The performance is based on the mission of four female British agents who operated behind German lines in France during World War II. Through exhibition stations and a performance of mime and dance you will learn how the agents used camouflage and code systems training to conceal themselves and communicate with allied forces.
The project leaders are Professors Lesley Ferris and Mary Tarantino whose research led them to the gates of the Natzweiler-Struthof concentration camp, where the four women, who had assisted in the escape of British soldiers, were executed in July 1944. How and why were they captured? Were they sacrificed to protect D-Day? You will not want to miss this saga of clandestine warfare.
The presentation will be held on Wednesday, 13 June 2012, 1000-1130 at the L-3 Stratis Conference Center, 2720 Technology Dr, Annapolis Junction, MD in the National Business Park (NBP). Lunch will be served following the program.
FEE: The Camouflage Program fee is $15 for NCMF members. The guest fee is $40, which includes an NCMF membership. Please make your check payable to NCMF and send to: NCMF Cryptologic Program Series,
PO Box 1682, Ft. Meade, MD 20755-1682. Send by COB 11 June. Inquiries to cryptmf@aol.com

Tuesday, 19 June 2012, 6:30 – 9:30 pm – Washington, DC - Surveillance 101 with Eric O'Neill Workshop 2 at the International Spy Museum

Test your surveillance skills on the mean streets of DC!
What if you were assigned to watch the most damaging spy in US history? As a young operative in the FBI, Eric O'Neill was put into position as Robert Hanssen's assistant with the secret task of spying on his boss, who was under suspicion of working for Russia. O'Neill's background with the FBI was in surveillance, so he was up to the challenge. But how would you measure up? It's your chance to find out. O'Neill is prepared to share his hard-earned expertise with you. This intense small group introduction to surveillance will include learning the basics and conducting surveillance in the streets of DC. Will you be able to track the "Rabbit" without being "made?" You'll learn how to snap clandestine shots and keep your target in view so you won't miss operational acts or secret meetings. O'Neill will lead the exercise and help you learn how to blend into the shadows for the best spy results!

19 June 2012, 11:30 am - McLean, VA - Defense Intelligence Forum meets to hear Gary Ross on "The Conflict between National Security and Freedom of the Press."

Gary Ross is a Special Agent with the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. His academic background includes a Master of Science of Strategic Intelligence degree from the National Intelligence University and a Bachelor of Arts degree from Michigan State University, with a dual major in Criminal Justice and Psychology. He has completed advanced training at the National Foreign Affairs Training Center, the Joint Counterintelligence Training Academy, and the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center.
During his 20-year career in federal law enforcement, Mr. Ross has conducted and supervised criminal, counterintelligence, and counterterrorism investigations and operations with the Department of Homeland Security, the Office of the Director of National Intelligence, the Naval Criminal Investigative Service, and the Department of Labor. He was a recipient of the Department of Defense Team Award for National Security Investigations in 2007 and the Director of Central Intelligence Team Award for Countering Foreign Denial and Deception in 2003. His work has taken him to Japan, South Korea, Thailand, Sri Lanka, Singapore, Indonesia, Bahrain, England, Italy, and Mexico. Mr. Ross' speech is based on his book, Who watches the Watchmen? The Conflict between National Security and Freedom of the Press. One of the primary themes of this book is the attempt to reconcile the conflict between a journalist's motivation for publishing classified information and the perceived harm resulting from the loss of intelligence sources and methods. Thus, discussing these conflicts should foster an improved understanding of how these Security issues are being confronting by the Intelligence Community and the Public.
For this forum, you may attribute the speaker's remarks. Everything will be on the record.
The Defense Intelligence Forum is open to members of all Intelligence Community associations and their guests.
LOCATION: Pulcinella Restaurant, 6852 Old Dominion Drive, McLean, VA. Pay at the door with a check for $29 payable to DIAA, Inc. Registration starts at 11:30 AM, lunch at 12:00 PM
Make reservations by 18 June 2012 by email to diforum@diaalumni.org. Include names, telephone numbers, and email addresses. For each attendee, choose among (Chicken Cacciatore, Tilapia Puttanesca, Lasagna, Sausage with Peppers, and Fettuccini with Portabella for your luncheon selection.
Pay at the door with a check for $ 29.00 per person, payable to DIAA, Inc.
Check is preferred, but will accept cash; however, credit card payments are discouraged.

23 June 2012, 2 pm - Kennebunk, ME - "THE THIRD JIHAD" film will be shown and is theme of meeting of AFIO Maine Chapter

National security and political analyst Ryan Mauro will participate in a showing of the film "The Third Jihad." Mauro is Fellow and Associate Director of Media Relations at the Clarion Fund/ Radicalislam.org. He has made over 300 appearances on talk radio and television programs internationally from both political spectrums and is a regular guest expert on FOX News Channel and FOX Business Network programs. Mauro is regularly quoted in books and newspapers including the New York Times and Reuters.
A terrorism consultant to government agencies, Mauro founded WorldThreats.com in 2003 where he is chief editor. He is Adjunct Professor of Homeland Security at Regent University and Liberty University. Mauro has a Bachelor's degree in intelligence studies and a Master's degree in political science.
Mauro will introduce the film "The Third Jihad" which has been described as a blockbuster and will answer questions at the end of the showing. "The Third Jihad" is partially based on a document discovered by the FBI. The film discusses how radical Islam is spreading in the U.S. through the use of prison recruitment, the establishment of Islamist compounds on U.S. soil and the use of front groups to spread the radical form of Islam undermining traditional institutions.
The meeting will be held at 2:00 p.m. at the Brick Store Museum Program Center, 2 Dane Street, Kennebunk, and is open to the public.
Non-members are asked to make a donation of $5.00. The annual membership fee for AFIO/ME is $25.00. Become a member of the Maine Chapter and save $20.
For information call 207-967-4298.

Saturday, 23 June 2012, 1000 - 1430 - Milford, MA - AFIO New England Hears Christopher Hickey, USN, on USCG's COASTWATCH and the ONI's Terrorist Sea Search Programs.

Our main speaker will be member Christopher Hickey. Chris will be speaking to us about two GWOT related programs, the Coast Guard's COASTWATCH and ONI's effort to find terrorists at sea. Chris has been intimately involved with both of these programs.
Christopher Hickey is the founder/principal of Prospect Street Consulting. With over 24 years experience in maritime security operations, intelligence collection & analysis operations, maritime domain awareness, crisis management, state & local intelligence fusion center operations, counter/anti terrorism analysis, and open source intelligence, Hickey is regarded as a leader in the fields of maritime and open source intelligence. His intelligence career encompasses 24+ years in the U.S. Navy and the national intelligence community in operational and key positions pertaining to counter terrorism, maritime and homeland security.
Chris is a graduate of the US Naval Academy, Naval War College, US Sports Academy, and the University of Maryland's School of Public Affairs.
This semester Chris is teaching two courses at Daniel Webster College. They are Intro to Intel Studies and a class on analytical methods using the new Heuer/Pherson book.
Note, as this meeting is a one day event we have not made any hotel arrangements.
Location: Courtyard by Marriott in Milford, Mass. The hotel web site is here http://www.marriott.com/hotels/travel/bosml-courtyard-boston-milford
Schedule: Registration & gathering, 1000 - 1130, membership meeting 1130 – 1200. Luncheon at 1200 followed by our speaker, with adjournment at 2:30PM.
For additional information contact us at afionechapter@gmail.com
Advance reservations are $25.00, $30.00 at the door - per person. ********Luncheon reservations must be made by 9 June 2012.**************
Mail your check and the reservation form to: Mr. Arthur Hulnick, 216 Summit Avenue # E102, Brookline, MA 02446, 617-739-7074 or hlnk@aol.com.

Wednesday, 27 June 2012, 6:30 – 8:30 pm – Washington, DC - "The Russian Illegals Two Years Later: What Did It Mean?" at the International Spy Museum

It's been two years since Americans were stunned to learn of the arrest of ten Russian "deep-cover" spies who had lived among us for decades. What's become of these one-time neighbors and Facebook friends and what have we learned about the success or failure of their mission to meet influential Americans and exploit them for their knowledge of government policy? "Illegals," like these spies, have been a Moscow specialty for years, but traditionally are used sparingly—for only the most sensitive of operations. What did we learn from these arrests? Seldom has the US government been able to find and arrest "illegals," so did this rare occurrence offer us important new information on Russian intelligence collection practices? H. Keith Melton, renowned intelligence historian, technical advisor to American intelligence agencies, author of Spycraft: The Secret History of the CIA's Spytechs, from Communism to Al-Qaeda, and International Spy Museum board member, will revisit the murky world of these "illegals:" who they were, how they operated, the threat they posed, and where they are now. With access to exclusive materials and images, he'll bring us up-to-date on the case. Retired KGB Major General Oleg Kalugin will also provide commentary based on his years of running agents in the United States.
WHERE: International Spy Museum: 800 F Street, NW Washington, DC Gallery Place/Chinatown Metrorail Station
Tickets: $12.50 Register at www.spymuseum.org
Tickets:  $94.  Space is limited to only 10 participants.  Advance registration required.  Call 202-654-0932 to register

Monday, 2 July 2012, 6:30 pm – "Revolutionary Spies: General Washington's Spycraft" at the International Spy Museum

This year when you celebrate the 4th of July you'll know it's really the 4th of SPY!
Diplomatic codes, savvy spy catchers, secret bankrolls, and seductive women sound like the perfect components of a 21st century spy ring, but they worked just as well during the American Revolution. Join John A. Nagy, award-winning author of Invisible Ink: Spycraft of the American Revolution, for this exploration of the spycraft that forged a nation. No one knows this period like Nagy, who has spent over 20 years doing primary research uncovering secrets about the founding fathers and the lengths to which they would go to ensure Britain's defeat. He recounts tales from Washington's "Deception Battle Plan" to how he obtained "the earliest and best Intelligence of the designs of the enemy" in British-controlled New York and Philadelphia. Nagy will share sources and methods and the previously unknown spies that he discovered.
Fee: Tickets: $9. Register at www.spymuseum.org

17-18 July 2012, 8:30-4:30 - Reston, VA - The CiCentre hosts Course 207: Introduction to the People's Republic of China (PRC) Intelligence and Counterintelligence Methodologies.

This course provides an introductory review of PRC intelligence and counterintelligence practices.
It focuses on the significant differences as well as the similarities between Chinese intelligence collection and counterintelligence practices and Western and European models.
The course looks at Chinese cultural considerations and PRC historical events which are essential to understanding collection practices and counterintelligence operations employed by the Chinese.
In addition to coverage of traditional espionage, the seminar also discusses the Chinese economic espionage threat.
Companies and government agencies concerned with the theft of dual-use, proprietary information and technology will find this seminar particularly useful in understanding that growing threat.
Information & registration here. Fee is $1,000. Course will be held in Reston, Virginia. For more information or to register contact: Adam Hahn

24-25 July 2012, 8:30 - 4:30 - Reston, VA - The CiCentre hosts Course 203: Vulnerabilities of Global Travel: Personnel & Information Protection

In today's international market place and global national security environment, global travel is an essential and absolute requirement for the corporate, military or government employee/contractor.
US personnel who travel internationally for personal or professional reasons, face enhanced threat realities from foreign intelligence collectors, unscrupulous business competitors and terrorists driven by many ideologies and objectives.
This essential seminar provides practical information and usable tactics to assist the global traveler.
This seminar covers pre-travel preparation planning, strategies to decrease individual profiles while traveling, plus arrival and personal conduct advice while at the travel destination(s) to enhance their personal safety.
Included in this seminar are strategies to recognize recruitment and elicitation operations, technical collection operations to assess the traveler and/or compromise their information, and/or criminal/terrorist pre-attack profile recognition.
Information & registration here. Fee is $1,000. Course will be held in Reston, Virginia. For more information or to register contact: Adam Hahn

Wednesday, 25 July 2012, 6:30 – 8:30 pm – "Lie Detection 101 Workshop" at the International Spy Museum

How to Use Your Eyes as Lie Detectors!
Every top interrogator learns how to catch a liar; now it's your turn. Join Gregory Hartley and Maryann Karinch as they debut the tools used to detect deception featured in their new edition of How to Spot a Liar. Hartley earned honors with the US Army as an interrogator and interrogation instructor and both teach law enforcement, business, and consumer audiences how to get the truth. Meet and assess new people at the Spy School Workshop, learn to spot the messages and emotions that people are really sending whether they know it or not, and enjoy your inner truth teller. You'll find out how to put your new understanding of prevarication to good use, whether you're trying to navigate a tough situation or simply want to win at poker.
Tickets: $20. Register at www.spymuseum.org

4 August 2012, 11:30 am - Melbourne, FL - AFIO Florida Satellite Chapter hosts CIA's James Fletcher on "Three HUMINT Cases from Life."

Speaker will be James B. Fletcher, former CIA operations officer and executive whose topic will be Three HUMINT Cases From Life and How Their Intelligence Was Used.
Location: Indian River Colony Club, Melbourne, FL.
To attend or for more information contact: Donna Czarnecki, donnacz12@aol.com

22-24 August 2012 - Raleigh, NC - "Dramatic Revelations - J. Edgar Hoover, Castro, Deep Throat, Carlos the Jackal, and Secret from CIA" the theme of the 8th Annual Raleigh Spy Conference

Dramatic Revelations: J. Edgar Hoover, Castro, Deep Throat, Carlos the Jackal, and Secrets from the CIA. The event underscores how recently declassified information re-writes history.
The FBI is not simply the nation's top cop agency, says RSC founder Bernie Reeves. The Bureau serves as America's domestic security service, responsible for tracking down spies in America and running counter-intelligence operations. And J. Edgar Hoover, the man who shaped and ran the FBI from 1924 to his death in 1972, was the nation's top domestic intelligence officer.
But who was the real Hoover?  FBI Historian John Fox will present a session on Hoover's role as chief intelligence officer – and share the latest declassified data on one of the most significant figures in US history.

Fidel Castro casts a long shadow over modern American history. He led a revolution, unexpectedly embraced communism and invited the Soviets to Cuba who installed offensive nuclear weapons 90 miles from the United States.
Brian Latell, formerly a Cuba hand for the CIA, has plowed through newly declassified documents - and interviewed secret Cuban agents who can now talk for the first time –  for his new book Castro's Secrets, revealing that the Cuban intelligence services were highly sophisticated. Cuban operatives duped the CIA and planted nearly 50 double agents in the US intelligence services. Latell also reveals from  secret sources that Castro had prior knowledge of the assassination of John F. Kennedy.

Max Holland, editor of the insider website Washington Decoded - and a prolific and respected author on key events of the modern era – has dug into newly declassified documents to reveal the true story of the motivation that compelled FBI assistant director Mark Felt to disguise himself as the infamous Deep Throat, the source that allegedly brought down a presidency and elevated two obscure journalists to super-star status. Watergate remains a watershed event in American history –and Mark Felt was the man who made it happen.

David Waltrop, an active CIA officer currently serving as a Program Manager for the Agency's Historical Collections Division (who formerly worked in the National Reconnaissance Office and as curator for the Defense Intelligence Agency) will reveal one of the most secret CIA operations of the Cold War, the Trieste 11 Deep Sea Vehicle. Now called An Underwater Ice Station Zebra, the true mission of the Trieste 11 expedition was hidden in rumor and speculation – until now.

Albert Garajales, INTERPOL Director of Public Relations and assistant coordinator of anti-Terrorism for Puerto Rico, will present an insider's assessment of the profile of the modern terrorist, beginning with Carlos the Jackal up to today's dangerous operatives.

Go to www.raleighspyconference.com for more information and to register. Or call  Carlie Sorosiak at the Metro Magazine office: 919-831-0999 or email carlie@metromagazine.net.   
The Raleigh Spy Conference was founded in 2003 by Bernie Reeves, editor and publisher of Raleigh Metro Magazine (www.metronc.com). Discounts are offered for intelligence workers, members of the armed forces, students, and seniors.
Bernie Reeves and Raleigh Metro Magazine will be hosting this 8th Raleigh Spy Conference at the NC Museum of History in downtown Raleigh.
And if you missed the 7th Raleigh Spy Conference, a beautifully prepared set of DVDs of event are available here.

14 September 2012 - Jersey City, NJ - New Jersey City University hosts 2nd Northeast Regional Security Education Symposium on "Tradecraft Primer Skills Acquisition"

In concert with launching the inaugural LC #1 degree program described above, NJCU will be hosting a regional Security Symposium on September 14, 2012. Please save the date. This is NJCU's second regional symposium since being designated a National Center of Academic Excellence in 2009 by the ODNI. CEUs and limited vendor tables will be available. The one-day conference costs are being finalized (ca. $150-225). Corporate sponsorships are being pursued as well. Invited Speakers: National Security Agency – Signal Intelligence; Federal Bureau of Investigation; NJ Department of Homeland Security; ASIS – International (Headquarters – not Regional); Office of the Director for National Intelligence; Local Participants of The Bus mission [See http://www.space.com/12996-secret-spy-satellites-declassified-nro.html ] For forthcoming details and a registration form, contact (201) 200-2275.

8-11 October 2012 - Orlando, FL - GEOINT 2012 Symposium

Hosted by the US Geospatial Intelligence Foundation (USGIF). The USGIF expects another agenda with insightful keynote speakers, interesting panels and breakout sessions, cutting-edge exhibitions from 250 organizations, and invaluable networking opportunities.
Event is being held at the Gaylord Palms Hotel & Convention Center
For more information visit http://geoint2012.com/


For Additional Events two+ months or greater....view our online Calendar of Events


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