AFIO Weekly Intelligence Notes #15-14 dated 15 April 2014

[Editors' Note: The WIN editors attempt to include a wide range of articles and commentary in the Weekly Notes to inform and educate our readers. However, the views expressed in the articles are purely those of the authors, and in no way reflect support or endorsement from the WIN editors or the AFIO officers and staff. We welcome comments from the WIN readers on any and all articles and commentary.]
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CONTENTS

Section I - INTELLIGENCE HIGHLIGHTS

Section II - CONTEXT & PRECEDENCE

Section III - COMMENTARY

Section IV -  Upcoming AFIO Events

Section VI - Other Upcoming Events

For Additional AFIO and other Events two+ months or more.... view our online Calendar of Events 

    • WIN CREDITS FOR THIS ISSUE: The WIN editors thank the following special contributors:  pjk and fwr.  They have contributed one or more stories used in this issue.

EARLY WARNING - AFIO Summer Luncheon, Friday, 13 June 2014

Morning speaker is Peter W. Finn, National Security Editor for The Washington Post (previously served as the Post's bureau chief in Moscow). His book, scheduled for release to public four days after this special event, discusses a 1960s CIA propaganda operation: The Zhivago Affair: The Kremlin, the CIA, and the Battle Over a Forbidden Book. The co-authors are Peter Finn and Petra Couvee [Couvee lives in Russia]. These authors take readers into the world of Soviet intelligentsia and Cold War politics to study how Boris Pasternak came to write and publish Doctor Zhivago (which first appeared in Italy in 1957). The authors use rich archival research, including previously classified CIA files, to depict the oppressive political conditions that gave rise to Pasternak's masterpiece, and the international firestorm that occurred when the novel was banned in the Soviet Union. The torturous ideological policing by the Soviets is discussed; for indeed, the tale of Doctor Zhivago itself is very much about the long psychic scar left by the Russian Revolution. The authors also present the role played by the Kremlin in persecuting Pasternak and his loved ones, as well as the role of the CIA in using his novel in a game of ideological warfare—overall, a triumphant reminder that successful covert and propaganda operations can fade into history devoid of any public recognition or credit for what became highly beneficial, pro-freedom outcomes.
Afternoon speaker is John "Jack" Devine, former CIA Deputy Director of Operations and Chief of the CIA Afghan Task Force, 1986-87. His book -- coming out day before our event -- is Good Hunting: A Spymaster's Story
"Jack Devine's unusually detailed accounting of, and insight into, intelligence operations from the height of the Cold War through the global war on terrorism puts a bright light on the intrigue of the inner workings of the CIA. Most important, though, are his principles for covert action. Our clandestine service officers and national leadership alike would do well to read and understand Devine's words and wisdom in this critical area." —Vice Admiral Thomas R. Wilson, U.S. Navy (Ret), former director, Defense Intelligence Agency

"The world of CIA clandestine operations and technologies is complex, tough, and often arcane and unforgiving, but also consummately professional and necessary. Jack Devine is a larger-than-life character who served a long and distinguished career, in the field and in headquarters, spanning important periods in CIA history. If you want a better understanding of the CIA; its complex, differentiated, and noble people; and its missions, this well-written book is for you." — Admiral William O. Studeman, U.S. Navy (Ret)

"Jack Devine's Good Hunting gives readers an inside look at CIA—the good and the bad— from someone who rose from the bottom of the Agency to the top, during some of its most turbulent times. There are new insights into covert operations from Chile to Afghanistan to Iran-Contra and the lessons that should be drawn from them by government leaders and the public at large. Beyond that, it's just a good read." —Walter Pincus, columnist for The Washington Post

"Good Hunting, like Jack Devine himself, is straightforward, clear, patriotic, fascinating, and at the center of decades of key events. Tired of angry or self-serving stereotypes about the CIA? Turn to Jack Devine. I did, and it was a great call." — Ambassador R. James Woolsey, former director of central intelligence, CIA

"Jack Devine has the intelligence officer's essential gift: the willingness to say no to bad ideas. Devine recounts the recurring pressure to do dumb things—from Central America to Afghanistan to Iran-Contra—which he usually was able to resist. His compelling memoir illustrates why the CIA is most successful when it sticks to the basics of 'good hunting' in espionage and covert action operations." —David Ignatius, columnist for The Washington Post and author of The Director

REGISTRATION: Early registration for this AFIO June 13 luncheon is .

 

AFIO Members are invited, at no cost, to this special Joint Event in Pennsylvania
A joint event by Dickinson College, the US Army Heritage and Education Center [part of the US Army War College] and the Central Intelligence Agency.

Cold War Forum: CIA Analysis and Collection

21 - 22 April 2014
Carlisle, PA

CONFERENCE SCHEDULE:The forum is centered on recent publication of two volumes by the CIA's Historical Collections: Penetrating The Iron Curtain: Resolving the Missile Gap and CIA Analysis of the Warsaw Pact Forces: The Importance of Clandestine Reporting. The authors and editors, John and Joan Bird will present and discuss the publications along with selected historians, authors and scholars in a series of panels.

• The first of three panels and reception will take place in Room 106, Althouse Hall, Dickinson College, followed the next day by two more panel discussions at the Army Education and Heritage Center.

• Looking at the analysis, technical collection and clandestine reporting about the Warsaw Pact forces from a distance of 30-50 years allows us to better understand the evolution of the intelligence community in qualitative and quantitative terms. As the work went forward and built upon successes with sources and methods, the analytic quality improved greatly, as did the value to the nation. The other story to be told is of the heroism of the human sources. The Warsaw Pact publication tells the story of three men, Pyotr Popov, Oleg Penkovskiy, and Ryszard Kuklinski. A separate panel offers an opportunity to appreciate their heroism. The forum also offers a venue to discuss some of the more successful operations of the cold war, such as the U-2 and Corona programs and the Berlin Tunnel.
- Speakers include CIA Historian Dr David Robarge, Mr and Mrs John and Joan Bird (authors and editors of the publications), Dr R. Craig Nation (US Army War College and Dickinson College), Professor Frank Leith Jones (US Army War College). Additional speakers include Jerrold Schecter (co-author of The Spy Who Saved The World: How a Soviet Colonel Changed the Course of the Cold War), Mr Eugene Poteat, Mr Lou Mehrer, Mr Fred Kaplan (author of The Wizards of Armageddon), Mr Hayden Peake (CIA), and Dr Richard Immerman (the current DeSerio Chair and author of The Hidden Hand: A Brief History of the CIA.)

Panels Schedule:
Monday 21 April – Evening, at Dickinson College's Althouse hall, Room 106, 45 North College St., Carlisle, PA 17013 [Althouse is #13 on this map]
Panel I, 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. - "Resolving the Missile Gap"
Moderator – Major General William F. Burns, U. S. Army (Retired)
Panelists: John Bird, CIA (Retired); Gene Poteat, CIA (Retired), Association of Former Intelligence Officers; Fred Kaplan, Author; Dr Richard Immerman, PhD, DeSerio Chair, U.S. Army War College.

Tuesday, 22 April at the Army War College Heritage Center, 950 Soldiers Drive, Carlisle, PA.
Panel II – 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. - " CIA Analysis of the Warsaw Pact; The Importance of Clandestine Reporting"
Moderator – Dr David Robarge, PhD, CIA Historian
Panelists: John and Joan Bird, CIA (Retired); Dr Craig Nation, PhD, Dickinson College / U.S. Army War College; Frank Jones, U.S. Army War College
Panel III – 1:00 to 3:00 p.m. - " The Men (Popov, Penkovskiy, Kuklinski)" Moderator – John Bird
Panelists; Hayden Peake, CIA; Lou Mehrer, CIA (Retired); Jerrold Schecter, Author; David Forden, CIA (Retired) (invited)
Wrap-up – Dr David Robarge, CIA Historian

• Attendance Fee: None.

Lodging: Nearby hotels are listed here. Directions from the Dickinson Campus are here

RSVP: If you wish to attend, please respond directly to event organizer, Dr. Kaufman, at denis.kaufman@gmail.com or visit AHEC's webpage for additional information.


AFIO's 2014 Intelligence Symposium
All speakers confirmed.

1 - 3 May 2014

GEOINT, HUMINT, SIGINT: Expanding Capabilities; Growing Challenges and Risks

Day One at the new headquarters of the
National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency

Register .

Registration closes on 23 April.

For an application form to mail or print, download this 1-page PDF here
Agenda is <here. The Agenda was updated on 15 April 2014

You will hear and meet...

• Letitia A. Long, NGA Director; turned GEOINT into crucial player in most intelligence and CT operations;
• Michael Sulick, former Director, CIA's National Clandestine Service, Intelligence Historian;
• John J. Hamre, President CSIS, former Deputy Secretary of Defense;
• Michael Warner, Historian, DoD and CIA;
• James Hughes, CIA Mideast Expert;
• Paul R. Pillar, former senior CIA analyst, on Intelligence and U.S. Foreign Policy: Iraq, 9/11, and Misguided Reform
• Kai Bird, Mideast Expert, author of The Good Spy: The Life and Death of Robert Ames;
• Stewart Baker, former NSA & DHS legal expert on privacy and intel issues;
• John Bennett, former Director, CIA's National Clandestine Service;
• Spike Bowman, former NSA, NCIX/DNI, FBI, privacy and intel legal issues;
• David Ignatius, author, journalist Washington Post; the media view of privacy sensitivities; author of The Director
• John Sano, former Deputy Director, National Clandestine Service, CIA;
• David Major, former FBI/National Security Council; Eyes-open expert on dangers the U.S. faces.
and banquet speaker: • Dr. John M. Poindexter, ADM, USN(Ret), visionary, brave lightning rod, and heralded pioneer in digital, real-time security who showed how to connect-the-dots; a leader in protecting privacy in a data-driven society; the architect of Big Data systems that sent terrorists running for cover and to their lawyers and front groups to circumvent the new capabilities.

Day One of the Event [at NGA] is open to U.S. citizens only. Days Two and Three are open to all members, subscribers, and guests.
All three days will be conducted at UNCLASSIFIED level.

Crowne Plaza Hotel, 1960 Chain Bridge Road, McLean, VA 22102, Phone: 1-888-233-9527

Use the following link: http://tinyurl.com/ko6ppau to enter a hotel reservation at the discounted $109/nite rate.

If there is any difficulty getting the AFIO $109/night rate, at the hotel ask for Kristina Dorough at 703-738-3114 M - F 7am - 5pm EST
We do NOT recommend calling the national reservation lines but suggest calling the hotel at the above number to get the special event rate now.


Section I - INTELLIGENCE HIGHLIGHTS

South Korean Intelligence Agency Faces 'Overhaul' Following Forgery Scandal. South Korea's president has apologized for the latest scandal to hit the country's intelligence service. This comes after three of its agents were charged with forging evidence against a suspected North Korean spy. 

President Park Guen-hye issued the apology at a meeting of her cabinet in Seoul on Tuesday.

"Regrettably, the National Intelligence Service's (NIS) wrongful practices and a system of lax oversight were revealed and caused concern among the public, and I would like to apologize for this," the president said.

"If such an event that deepens public distrust happens again, then it will be strictly held accountable," she added. [Read more: DeutscheWelle/15April2014]

Senate Intelligence Committee Investigating Leak to McClatchy, Feinstein Says. The Senate Intelligence Committee has opened an investigation into how McClatchy obtained the classified conclusions of a report into the CIA's use of waterboarding and other harsh interrogation tactics, the panel's chairwoman said Friday.

Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., said she was also referring the case to the Justice Department for investigation.

"If someone distributed any part of this classified report, they broke the law and should be prosecuted," Feinstein said in a prepared statement. "The committee is investigating this unauthorized disclosure and I intend to refer the matter to the Department of Justice."

Feinstein issued her statement a day after McClatchy reported on the 20 major conclusions of the committee's four-year, $40 million investigation into the top-secret detention and interrogation program that the CIA operated under the Bush administration. [Read more: Landay/McClatchy/11April2014]

Turkey Seeks to Enhance Intelligence's Structure. A draft bill to restructure the Turkish National Intelligence Organization (MİT) was introduced in the Turkish Parliament once again after it was proposed by the ruling AK Party in February. Even though it was close to being approved last week, disputes between the parties caused a delay in approval. The proposed draft bill aims to broaden the intelligence organization's reach following the black propaganda and smear campaigns against the organization carried out by the Gόlen Movement, which infiltrated key governmental bodies.

Raids on MİT trucks en route to Syria with humanitarian aid in January were among the main motives of strengthening Turkish intelligence.

The bill gives MİT the authority to conduct operations in the fields of foreign security, counterterrorism, national security, cybersecurity and eavesdrop on international and pay phone calls. It also introduces a jail term of up to nine years for the publication of the MİT's classified documents if leaked to media outlets. It also paves the way for the MİT to reach out to terrorist organizations that are threatening Turkey's security. [Alkan/DailySabah/15April2014]

Maltese Financial Intelligence Analysis Unit sees 132 new cases over 2013. Last year the Financial Intelligence Analysis Unit (FIAU) opened 121 new cases from the 143 Suspicious Transaction Reports (STRs) it had received, a 17 per cent increase over the number of STRs investigated during 2012. 

An additional 11 cases were opened after the unit received information from its counterpart financial intelligence units in other countries - making a grand total of 132 reports that were investigated.

Overall, the majority - 46 percent - of reports were made by credit institutions, 11 percent by remote gaming companies, 10 percent by financial institutions, seven percent by company service providers and six percent by trustees and fiduciaries.

According to the FIAU's annual report published this week, the main type of cases forwarded to the police last year were "undoubtedly the incorporation of companies in Malta by foreign nationals and the use of credit institutions by foreign nationals as a vehicle to launder the proceeds of criminal funds generated outside Malta". [Read more: MaltaIndependent/14April2014]

U.K. Appoints New Chief of GCHQ Spy Agency. The British government on Tuesday appointed Robert Hannigan as the new chief of its secretive GCHQ intelligence agency, a senior civil servant who has advised Prime Minister David Cameron on counterterrorism and security issues.

The appointment comes as the methods of the U.K.'s Government Communications Headquarters, known as GCHQ, face increased scrutiny after the revelations by former U.S. National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden raised questions about the tension between intelligence gathering by the U.S. and U.K. and people's privacy.

Mr. Hannigan has held a variety of government posts in the intelligence field, most recently as the Foreign Office's director general of defence and intelligence, the Foreign Office said in a statement. He has chaired the high-level emergency response "COBR" meetings on terror incidents, was responsible for the U.K.'s first cybersecurity strategy, and oversaw the national security strategy, it said.

The 49-year-old's career in the civil service began in the communications department of the Northern Ireland Office in 2000. He later worked as the main adviser to then Prime Minister Tony Blair on the Northern Ireland peace process with responsibility for negotiations with the province's political parties and other groups, and contacts with the Irish government and U.S. administration, the Foreign Office said. [Read more: Winning/WallStreetJournal/15April2014]

USS George Washington, CVW 5 Intelligence Team Wins Top Fleet Award. The U.S. Navy's forward-deployed aircraft carrier USS George Washington (CVN 73) and its embarked air wing, Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 5, earned the 2013 Excellence in Intelligence and Information Warfare Award (EIIWA), April 8.

The EIIWA recognized the carrier and carrier air wing intelligence and information warfare team that best demonstrated superior afloat intelligence and information warfare readiness and performance in support of operations.

"This is a very significant award as it is George Washington's first time winning the [EIIWA]," said Cmdr. David Wolynski, George Washington's intelligence officer. "From an Intelligence and Information Warfare perspective, it is the top Fleet award."

George Washington and CVW 5 competed against all U.S. Pacific Fleet strike groups for this award. [Read more: Lesonik/DVIDS/11April2014]

'God's Eye' Spy System Hits Test Market Streets With Real-Time Recording. A new surveillance system that collects and records information in real-time - and then lets trackers rewind, zoom in and follow certain targets - has hit the test market streets of Baltimore, Md., and Dayton, Ohio, and in at least one crime-fighting unit in California.

More test markets are in the works, Breitbart reported, saying the system is being hailed as a sort of "God's eye" for intelligence and law enforcement agencies.

It's like a "live version of Google Earth, only with TiVo capabilities," said creator Ross McNutt, president of Persistent Surveillance Systems, in the online magazine Gizmodo.

The PSS system basically puts super high-resolution cameras aboard planes. The pilot can then capture a 25-square-mile segment of Earth on a live, ongoing basis for up to six hours, Gizmodo reported. Coming up next is a larger system with more information and data inputting ability that won't even let people drive out of the system's frames - because there won't be any frames, Gizmodo reported. [Read more: Chumley/WashingtonTimes/15April/2014]

House Intelligence Chair: Brennan's Kiev Visit Could Improve Coordination With Ukraine. The chairman of the House Intelligence Committee said on Monday that CIA director John Brennan's visit to Kiev over the weekend could help U.S. improve its intelligence sharing efforts with Ukraine.

"Hopefully Mr. Brennan's trip will lead to more intelligence sharing on Russian activities threatening Ukraine," House Intelligence chairman Mike Rogers said in a statement to BuzzFeed. The U.S. has neglected to share key intelligence with the Ukrainians during the political crisis that has resulted in the Russian annexation of Crimea. The Daily Beast reported last week that senior U.S. military officers had been told not to give details to their Ukrainian counterparts about Russian troop movements along the border with Ukraine.

Rogers also called for more non-lethal aid to the Ukrainians.

"My recent visit with Ukrainian leaders and intelligence officials made clear that the Ukrainians need more help," Rogers said. "Just as in Crimea, Russia has sent teams of intelligence agents and packs of thugs to provinces in Eastern Ukraine to provoke conflict." [Read more: Gray/BuzzFeed/14April2014]

Mercyhurst University Names New Intelligence School After Tom Ridge. Mercyhurst University announced that it will name its new school in intelligence and information science after Tom Ridge, the nation's first Secretary of Homeland Security and former 43rd Governor of Pennsylvania.

The Tom Ridge School of Intelligence Studies and Information Science aims to prepare students for careers in national security, law enforcement and business. Mercyhurst's innovative intelligence program draws students from across the nation and abroad and currently ranks as the university's top major.

"Graduates of Mercyhurst's intelligence studies program are well known and highly regarded inside the walls of our nation's intelligence and defense agencies in Washington," said Gov. Ridge. "I am honored that Mercyhurst University, an institution with which I have enjoyed a long and proud affiliation, would choose to attach my name to this new school. The young men and women who will leave with degrees will play a critical role in defending our nation's safety and securing our freedom."

Tom Ridge currently serves as CEO of Ridge Global, a Washington, DC-based security consulting firm. An Erie native and long-time friend of the University, Ridge donated his archives to Mercyhurst in 2013. According to dean and architect of the school, James Breckenridge, Mercyhurst chose to dedicate its new school to Ridge based on his "global mindset" and prominence in the national security realm. [Read more: Vicinanzo/HSToday/15April2014]


Section II - CONTEXT & PRECEDENCE

Eyes Around Us: Pacific Science Center Delves into World of Espionage. This is not for the claustrophobic. I'm crawling through a ventilation duct, peering through grates, trying to spy on a KGB agent. In a few moments I'll have to negotiate a laser maze to successfully complete my espionage mission.

I'm not training to become an NSA agent. It's all part of "Spy: The Secret World of Espionage" at Pacific Science Center in Seattle. It's the first public exhibition of spycraft artifacts and techniques from the collections of the CIA, the FBI and the National Reconnaissance Office (NRO).

While the (optional) duct crawl and laser maze are a bit of Hollywood, the rest of the show is a thorough, in-depth and fascinating look at the people who spy for us and spy on us.

Many of the 250 artifacts in "Spy" are the property of H. Keith Melton, an author, historian, AFIO member, and authority on spy technology. He is the technical adviser on the TV Cold War drama The Americans and has more than 10,000 spy artifacts in his collection. [Read more: Sailor/TheNewsTribune/4April2014]

Inside the FBI's Secret Relationship With the Military's Special Operations. When U.S. Special Operations forces raided several houses in the Iraqi city of Ramadi in March 2006, two Army Rangers were killed when gunfire erupted on the ground floor of one home. A third member of the team was knocked unconscious and shredded by ball bearings when a teenage insurgent detonated a suicide vest.

In a review of the nighttime strike for a relative of one of the dead Rangers, military officials sketched out the sequence of events using small dots to chart the soldiers' movements. Who, the relative asked, was this man - the one represented by a blue dot and nearly killed by the suicide bomber?

After some hesitation, the military briefers answered with three letters: FBI.

The FBI's transformation from a crime-fighting agency to a counterterrorism organization in the wake of the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks has been well documented. Less widely known has been the bureau's role in secret operations against al-Qaeda and its affiliates in Iraq and Afghanistan, among other locations around the world. [Read more: Goldman&Tate/WashingtonPost/10April2014]

Students Abroad Warned of Foreign Intelligence Threat. Three years ago, Glenn Duffie Shriver, a Michigan resident and former college student who had studied in the People's Republic of China (PRC), was sentenced to federal prison in the U.S. for attempting to provide national defense information to PRC intelligence officers. 

According to the Institute of International Education, more than 280,000 American students studied abroad last year. These experiences provide students with tremendous cultural opportunities and can equip them with specialized language, technical, and leadership skills that make them very marketable to U.S. private industry and government employers.

But this same marketability makes these students tempting and vulnerable targets for recruitment by foreign intelligence officers whose long-term goal is to gain access to sensitive or classified U.S. information. Glenn Shriver - prodded by foreign intelligence officers into eventually applying for U.S. government jobs- cited his naivety as a key factor in his actions.

The FBI - as the lead counterintelligence agency in the U.S. - has ramped up efforts to educate American university students preparing to study abroad about the dangers of knowingly or unknowingly getting caught up in espionage activities. As part of these efforts, we're making available on this website our Game of Pawns: The Glenn Duffie Shriver Story video, which dramatizes the incremental steps taken by intelligence officers to recruit Shriver and convince him to apply for jobs with the U.S. State Department and the Central Intelligence Agency. We'd like American students traveling overseas to view this video before leaving the U.S. so they're able to recognize when they're being targeted and/or recruited. [Read more: FBI.gov/14April2014]

Former Intelligence Officers Talk Spying. Students and visitors caught a glimpse of the complex and deadly world of counterintelligence Monday evening at "Spy Games: The Art of Counterintelligence" as two espionage experts discussed security issues the U.S. faces at home and abroad.

James Olson, former chief of counterintelligence at the CIA and senior lecturer at Texas A&M's Bush School, and Michael Waguespack, former senior counterintelligence executive with the FBI, described how the U.S. faces a threat rarely seen or heard of by the public - spying.

"There are friendly countries, but there are no friendly intelligence services," Olson said.

Olson and Waguespack described a world hidden from the public, where countries use sophisticated spy networks to steal U.S. political and technological secrets and to compromise U.S. spy networks abroad.

Olson named China, Russia and Cuba as the primary threats in U.S. counterintelligence.

"Never in my memory has our country been more in peril at home and abroad than it is right now," Olson said. [Read more: Rangel/TheBattilion/14April2014]

In From the Cold: CIA in Hot Seat With Senate and Fallout From Snowden Disclosures. The art of a good spy is to go undetected.

But as tensions continue between Congress and the CIA over allegations that the intelligence agency improperly spied on Senate staffers, the nation's spy agency has found itself squarely in the spotlight. Veteran CIA officer Peter Earnest told The Fine Print that the conflict between the nation's spies and its legislators is nothing new.

"There's often tension... over access," Earnest told The Fine Print during an interview at the International Spy Museum in Washington, where Earnest is now executive director. "Should we give them this? Should we give them that? In other words, do they have a right to have this? This is about sources. This is method. Whereas the overseers think we should be able to have that."

Earnest, who worked as an operative and as the CIA's liaison to the Senate, said the CIA has historically taken a "bad rap" from Congress and that recent attention on the agency, from the likes of Democratic Sen. Dianne Feinstein and Republican Sen. Rand Paul, is just the present day manifestation of the strained relationship.

"Even if you go back to the time of the Church committee the question was raised, very much like Rand Paul, 'is this an out-of-control agency?'" he said. "The question then was 'Is this a rogue agency?' And the findings in the end were no. The issue if there is one is it's highly responsive to the direction that it's given." [Read more: YahooNews/9April2014]


Section III - COMMENTARY

Is the U.S. Waging a War of Ideas? I was struck by two recent, seemingly unrelated news articles that have unexpected relevance to the struggle against violent jihadism.

The first of these concerns revelations from a new book about how in the 1950s the CIA helped disseminate Boris Pasternak's novel Dr. Zhivago to undermine the appeal of communism. 

The second concerns efforts by Rajiv Shah, head of the U.S. Agency for International Development, to retool his outfit, born of the Cold War, to meet new challenges.

In my view the first article implicitly suggests what the CIA and other agencies of the US government should be doing today to wage the current version of the Cold War - a struggle not against communism (whose appeal does not extend beyond a few Western college campuses) but against Islamism. In the Cold War, the CIA saw its mission as waging ideological war, which meant publishing "subversive" books among other things. Is the CIA doing anything similar today? [Read more: Boot/CommentaryMagazine/9April2014]

From Athens to Sparta.  Exactly one year ago, I ran the Boston Marathon. Today, I took my oath to become an intelligence officer in the United States Navy.

It's often said that in works of fiction, action reveals character. But, much as I like to imagine myself as the protagonist in some fantastic rom-com, sci-fi-suspense-thriller, the same cannot be said of real life. It is the character of an action that reveals character. In other words, how one makes big decisions makes all the difference. The thoughts and conversations that led up to my decision to join the military are worth consideration for many other Harvard students.

I joined for many reasons, not least of which were the events I witnessed in Boston one year ago. We talk a lot about privilege at Harvard, but some privileges are more often overlooked than others. In the United States we all share in our relative freedom and safety, but it is easy to forget them in the absence of a major disruption of these privileges, especially when someone else is picking up the check.

It's easy to pay lip service to grand platitudes about the honor of military service, but sometimes the details worry me. I'll miss the snooze button on my alarm, my long hair, and being able to sleep on an unmoving flat surface. But my circadian rhythm will adapt, my hair will grow back, and I'll get my sea legs. Sometimes the little things encourage me. I'm going to wear the uniform, read Moby Dick on an aircraft carrier, and constantly make seaman puns. Also I have it on good authority that service members pay a discount price at Disney World.

Honestly, the difficulty of getting into Harvard and running marathons did not compare to the enormity of signing on that dotted line. [Read more: Siskind/HarvardCrimson/15April2014]

Real Spying is Much More Boring Than Depicted on The Americans. The big bad bear from Moscow is back, and not just in Crimea. FX's The Americans, about deep-cover KGB "illegals" living in Washington, D.C., in the early 1980s, is now midway through its second season. There's much to like about the show, from top-notch performances by Keri Russell and Matthew Rhys, to their reliance on clunky, retro-spy technology, to the clever manipulation of a common fear felt, no doubt, by most children at one point or another that their parents have secret identities (it ain't paranoia if it's true).

But I was in the intelligence business too, and a fundamental part of the series irks me. Even though the CIA hired me after the 9/11 attacks to fight a new menace - terrorism and Islamic extremism - the corridors at Langley still echo with the footsteps of old timers who recall the protean fight against the Soviets. And regardless of how that conflict is portrayed in Joe Weisberg's captivating series, it was not a sequence of increasingly lethal encounters between U.S. and Russian intelligence services.

To be sure, much about the show is based on reality. The premise - that Russian spooks were living double lives in the suburbs - was inspired in part by a real-life network of Russian illegals (made famous by the bombshell Anna Chapman) that was busted by the FBI in 2010. Then there is the series of background events - the assassination attempt on President Ronald Reagan, Alexander Haig's controversial statement that "I'm in control here" - that situate the drama on an authentic historical timeline.

But The Americans' fidelity to fact often ends there: The KGB certainly ran significant intelligence-gathering operations during the Cold War - and even carried out "dirty tricks," like organizing a racist letter-writing campaign, purportedly by American white supremacists, against African diplomats at the United Nations, and desecrating American synagogues and Jewish cemeteries to stir up discord and prove that the United States was a lousy place to live.

At the end of the day, however, the KGB never actually killed anyone in America. [Read more: Peritz/HeraldOnline/14April2014]


Section IV Coming AFIO Events

AFIO EDUCATIONAL EVENTS IN COMING TWO MONTHS....

Friday, 18 April 2014, noon - San Diego, CA - AFIO San Diego Chapter to hold meeting on Domestic Cyber Threats.

We will have a very engaging, DOD offensive cyber expert as a speaker on domestic cyber threats. Please let me know if you have any questions, and if you plan (at least tentatively) on attending.
Replies to Alex Carrillo, AFIO San Diego Chapter President, alexander.carrillo@hotmail.com or call (858) 531-7433.
Exact location TBD.

1 - 3 May 2014 - Tysons Corner, VA - AFIO 2014 Intelligence Symposium.

AFIO 2014 Intelligence Symposium - Agenda and Registration Now Available Online- All speakers are confirmed. Theme is GEOINT, HUMINT, SIGINT: Expanding Capabilities; Growing Challenges and Risks

Day One at the new headquarters of the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency. Registration closes on 23 April.
Register . Agenda is <here. The Agenda was updated on 15 April 2014. For an application form to mail or print, download this 1-page PDF here

You will hear/meet...

• Letitia A. Long, NGA Director; turned GEOINT into crucial player in most intelligence and CT operations;
• Michael Sulick, former Director, CIA's National Clandestine Service, Intelligence Historian;
• John J. Hamre, President CSIS, former Deputy Secretary of Defense;
• Michael Warner, Historian, DoD and CIA;
• James Hughes, CIA Mideast Expert;
• Paul R. Pillar, former senior CIA analyst, on Intelligence and U.S. Foreign Policy: Iraq, 9/11, and Misguided Reform
• Kai Bird, Mideast Expert, author of The CIA in Beirut;
• Stewart Baker, former NSA & DHS legal expert on privacy and intel issues;
• John Bennett, former Director, CIA's National Clandestine Service;
• Spike Bowman, former NSA, NCIX/DNI, FBI, privacy and intel legal issues;
• David Ignatius, author, journalist Washington Post; the media view of privacy sensitivities;
• John Sano, former Deputy Director, National Clandestine Service, CIA;
• David Major, former FBI/National Security Council; Eyes-open expert on dangers the U.S. faces.
and banquet speaker: • Dr. John M. Poindexter, ADM, USN(Ret), visionary, brave lightning rod, and heralded pioneer in digital, real-time security who showed how to connect-the-dots; a leader in protecting privacy in a data-driven society; the architect of Big Data systems that sent terrorists running for cover and to their lawyers and front groups to circumvent the new capabilities.

ay One of the Event [at NGA] is open to U.S. citizens only. Days Two and Three are open to all members, subscribers, and guests.
All three days will be conducted at UNCLASSIFIED level.

Crowne Plaza Hotel, 1960 Chain Bridge Road, McLean, VA 22102, Phone: 1-888-233-9527

Use the following link: http://tinyurl.com/ko6ppau to enter a hotel reservation at the discounted $109/nite rate.

If there is any difficulty getting the AFIO $109/night rate, at the hotel ask for Kristina Dorough at 703-738-3114 M - F 7am - 5pm EST
We do NOT recommend calling the national reservation lines but suggest calling the hotel at the above number to get the special event rate.

Saturday, 3 May 2014 - Orange Park, FL - AFIO North Florida Chapter hosts meeting

Location: Country Club of Orange Park. Questions and reservations: Quiel Begonia at qbegonia@comcast.net or call 352-332-6150. Cost will be $16 each, pay the Country Club at the luncheon.

Saturday, 10 May 2014, noon - 2 - Indian Harbor Beach, FL - The AFIO Florida Satellite Chapter hosts Dick Kerr discussing Robert Gates' book: Duty.

CIA veteran Dick Kerr will discuss Robert Gates' book Duty: Memoirs of a Secretary at War. The meeting will convene at the Eau Gallie Yacht Club, 100 Datura Drive, Indian Harbor Beach, FL. For information and reservations, please contact Barbara Keith, bobbie6769@juno.com, or 321 777 5561.

Wednesday, 14 May 2014, 6 - 9 pm - Scottsdale, AZ - AFIO AZ Chapter's 2nd Annual James Bond 007 Black Tie Event

AFIO's Arizona Chapter's scholarship fundraiser helps support the students of the defense and security studies at ASU.
Attire: Black Tie Optional
EVENT: Shaken not Stirred Martini Bar, Sit down dinner with hosts at each table representing the CIA Clandestine Service, FBI, Military Intelligence, and Law Enforcement Intelligence who will share war stories and answer questions; Bond Girls; live entertainment and dancing; Aston Martin (minus Machine Guns); Charitable fundraising auction of intelligence & spy paraphernalia; related art objects.
Tickets: $62.50 per person; $125 per couple until April 30
$75 per person; $150 per couple May 1 to May 11.
RSVP: 0072014@afioaz.org. Send check to: AFIO AZ 8614 E Appaloosa Trail, Scottsdale, AZ 85258. Select Chicken Provencal or Poached Salmon, and indicate full name of each guest.

15 May 2014, noon - 2 pm - San Francisco, CA - The AFIO James Quesada Chapter hosts Farhad Mansourian, former officer in the Imperial Iranian Army. He will discuss the current Iranian government and intelligence related to terror structure and nuclear activities.

11:30AM no host cocktails; meeting starts at noon. United Irish Cultural Center, 2700 45th Avenue, SF (between Sloat/Wawona). RSVP required by 5/1/14 to Mariko Kawaguchi: e-mail afiosf@aol.com and mail check made out to "AFIO" to: Mariko Kawaguchi, P.O. Box 117578, Burlingame, CA 94011. Members and students: $25; non-member guests $35 (must be accompanied by member).

15 May 2014, 11:30am - 2 pm - Englewood, CO - The AFIO Rocky Mountain Chapter hears from Thomas Ravenelle, FBI SAC Denver

AFIO will hold a joint meeting with FBI's InfraGard featuring Thomas Ravenelle, FBI Denver Division Supervising Agent in Charge. SAC Ravenelle will talk about a case briefing and overview of a closed EOD case. The meeting will be held at the Perfect Landing Restaurant, which is upstairs at the Denver Jet Center FBO, 7625 S. Peoria Street, Englewood CO 80112. Phone: 303-649-4478. There are seating limitations of 45 seats so we will accept reservations on a first come first serve basis. You will receive directions when you RSVP to Tom Van Wormer at robsmom@pcisys.net. The lunch will cost $15.00. You can pay at the door.

Friday, 13 June 2014, 10:30am - 2pm - Tysons Corner, VA - AFIO Summer Luncheon featuring Good Hunting by Jack Devine, former CIA director of operations and chief of the CIA Afghan Task Force, 1986-87. The morning speaker is Peter Finn, National Security Editor for The Washington Post. His book, The Zhivago Affair: The Kremlin, the CIA, and the Battle Over a Forbidden Book, discusses a risky, highly successful 1960s CIA propaganda operation.

John "Jack" J. Devine addresses his colleagues and other AFIO members at this luncheon upon the release of his book, Good Hunting: An American Spymaster's Story. Devine served in the CIA for more than three decades, participating in covert operations that took him from Allende's Chile through Iran-Contra and Charlie Wilson's Afghanistan to George Tenet's Iraq, eventually rising to the position of Director of the DO [today's National Clandestine Service]. This book is a master class in spying.

Peter Finn's book, co-authored with Petra Couvee [Couvee lives in Russia], discusses the world of Soviet intelligentsia and Cold War politics to study how Boris Pasternak came to write and publish Doctor Zhivago (which first appeared in Italy in 1957). The authors use previously classified CIA files to depict the oppressive political conditions that gave rise to Pasternak's masterpiece, and the international firestorm that occurred when the novel was banned in the Soviet Union. The torturous ideological policing by the Soviets mirrored the tale of Doctor Zhivago itself which harbored a long psychic scar from the Russian Revolution. The authors also present the role played by the Kremlin in persecuting Pasternak and his loved ones, as well as the role of the CIA in using his book in a game of ideological warfare—overall, a triumphant reminder that successful covert and propaganda operations, though they can fade into history devoid of public recognition or credit, played significant roles and led to some highly beneficial, pro-freedom outcomes.

Early registration is .

27 June 2014 - Los Angeles, CA - AFIO Los Angeles hears from Dr. Erik Nemeth on "Cultural Intelligence in International Affairs and Foreign Policy."

Dr. Erik Nemeth from the RAND Corporation will be the guest speaker for the June 27, 2014 meeting. Dr. Nemeth will present "Cultural Intelligence in International Affairs & Foreign Policy" - The politics of historical & cultural property and the intelligence gathering to assess the political significance of looting and repatriation of cultural property. Please RSVP for attendance: AFIO_LA@Yahoo.com

For Additional Events two+ months or greater....view our online Calendar of Events

Section VI - Other Upcoming Events

MANY more International Spy Museum Events in 2014 with full details are listed on the AFIO Website at www.afio.com.

Wednesday, 23 April 2014, 6:30 - 9:30pm - Washington, DC - Spy School Workshop: Surveillance 101 with Eric O'Neil, at the International Spy Museum

Spring into surveillance!
As a young operative in the FBI, Eric O'Neill was used to conducting surveillance; he was even put into the position of spying on his boss. The boss was Robert Hanssen, who was under suspicion of working for Russia, and O'Neill was up to the challenge. Now he'll share his expertise with you. O'Neill has conducted many outdoor surveillance exercises for the Museum, and he's ready to take those with the right skills up a notch. You'll be trailing the "Rabbit" through a complicated urban setting with red herrings and false leads. O'Neill will rate your clandestine prowess while you spy on secret meetings and operational acts and see if you can uncover the spy skullduggery that's afoot while you are on foot. There is no guarantee that your "Rabbit" won't escape!
Tickets: $94. Space is limited to only 10 participants -- advance registration required! Call Laura Hicken at 202.654.0932 to register.

Tuesday, 13 May 2014 , 6:30pm - Washington, DC - Why Intelligence Fails, at the International Spy Museum

"What you're surprised with depends on who you are - " --Philippe Silberzahn
Who lives in caves, only holy men or primitive cavemen? Dr. Milo Jones, visiting professor at IE Business School in Madrid, Spain, thinks that the answer to that question helps explain the intelligence failure of 9/11. He comes to the International Spy Museum to argue that the CIA's repeated intelligence failures are a result of the fact that the CIA thinks that intelligence analysis is science while it is really a social process in which identity and culture play a major role. Also joining us for the evening will be Dr. Mark Lowenthal, CEO of the Intelligence and Security Academy and former assistant director of Central Intelligence for Analysis and Production. He will engage with Dr. Jones on the provocative conclusions of the book Constructing Cassandra: Reframing Intelligence Failure at the CIA, 1947-2001, that Jones co-authored with Philippe Silberzahn of EMLYON Business School in France.
Tickets: $10. Visit www.spymuseum.org

Thursday, 12 June 2014 - CIA Technology Exposition - CIA Headquarters in Langley, VA 

Hosted by the Office of the CIO, the CIA Technology Expo returns to the CIA Original Headquarters this June! This exclusive event is one of the very few opportunities to showcase your products and services inside the walls of the CIA. This is a great opportunity to network with CIO personnel as well as over 1,000 other CIA personnel. Over 100 applications will be collected but only 55 will be hand-selected by CIA to exhibit.
The CIA Technology Council will review all applications, make selections, and notify NCSI of accepted exhibitors. Please keep your answers concise and explain exactly the products and services you have to offer the CIA. The application process is free, you will only be charged if you are selected to exhibit!
In order to ensure that your application is processed, please complete both the 2014 Tech Expo Contract and the CIA Application. All applications must be received by 12:00 PM EST on April 4, 2014! All responses must be typed including electronic signatures and sent electronically. 
Please contact your NCSI sales representative at 443-561-2400 for application and contract forms and additional information. 
www.ncsi.com


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