AFIO Weekly Intelligence Notes #26-14 dated 8 July 2014

[Editors' Note: The WIN editors attempt to include a wide range of articles and commentary in the Weekly Notes to inform and educate our readers. However, the views expressed in the articles are purely those of the authors, and in no way reflect support or endorsement from the WIN editors or the AFIO officers and staff. We welcome comments from the WIN readers on any and all articles and commentary. IMPORTANT: AFIO does not "vet" or endorse research inquiries, career announcements, or job offers. Reasonable-sounding inquiries and career offerings are published as a service to our members, and for researchers, educators, and subscribers. You are urged to exercise your usual caution and good judgment when responding, and should verify the source independently before supplying any resume, career data, or personal information.]
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CONTENTS

Section I - INTELLIGENCE HIGHLIGHTS

Section II - CONTEXT & PRECEDENCE

Section III - COMMENTARY

Section IV - Upcoming Events

Upcoming AFIO Events

Other Upcoming Events

    • WIN CREDITS FOR THIS ISSUE: The WIN editors thank the following special contributors:  pjk and fwr.  They have contributed one or more stories used in this issue.

 

Wednesday, 09 July 2014, noon - Washington, DC - Global Terrorism, Espionage and Cybersecurity Update, at the International Spy Museum

Be the first to learn the latest intelligence news! Join David Major, retired FBI agent and former director of Counterintelligence, Intelligence and Security Programs, for a briefing on the hottest intelligence and security issues, breaches, and penetrations. Presented in partnership with The Centre for Counterintelligence and Security Studies (CI Centre), these updates will cover worldwide events such as breaking espionage cases and arrest reports, cyber espionage incidents, and terrorist activity. Learn Snowden’s current status and what could happen next with this case. Major uses his expertise to analyze trends and highlight emerging issues of interest to both intelligence and national security professionals and the public. Cases are drawn from the CI Centre’s SPYPEDIA®, the most comprehensive source of espionage information in the world, containing events and information that may not be reported by mainstream media outlets. Major will also highlight and review the latest books and reports to keep you current on what is hitting think tank desks.
Tickets: Free! No registration required. Visit www.spymuseum.org


You are cordially invited to

A lecture on the topic of 

How to Conduct a Foreign Counterintelligence Investigation

with
Dennis D. Staszak
Former Deputy Unit Chief, Foreign Counterintelligence
and Counterterrorism Training Unit, FBI
Assistant Dean, Northern Virginia Community College

Tuesday, July 15, 4:30 PM

The Institute of World Politics
1521 16th Street NW, Washington, DC 20036
Please contact sdwyer@iwp.edu with any questions.

Dennis Staszak is a 33 year veteran of the Federal Bureau of Investigation and has investigated numerous criminal and national security matters. He specializes in foreign counterintelligence investigations, and previously served as the Deputy Unit Chief of the FBI's Foreign Counterintelligence and Counterterrorism Training Unit. Prior to retirement, Professor Staszak instructed new agents and senior police executives at the FBI Academy, FBI National Academy, and many international police training facilities. Starting March, 2007, Professor Staszak has taught a graduate course in Intelligence Theory and Applications for Law Enforcement Managers attending the FBI National Academy.
He currently serves as Assistant Dean and Professor of National Security and Administration of Justice studies at the Northern Virginia Community College, and an Adjunct Faculty member teaching Intelligence Analysis and Counterintelligence Concepts at George Mason University.
Prof. Staszak is a graduate of Criminal Justice Studies at the University of Wisconsin.  He received a Master of Arts degree in the area of International Transactions from George Mason University, Fairfax, Virginia, a Master of Science degree in Strategic Intelligence Studies from the National Intelligence University, Washington, D.C., and has done graduate work at the University of Virginia and The Institute of World Politics.
He previously served for three years on active duty in the United States Army during the Vietnam War era, and is a graduate of advanced language studies at the Defense Language Institute.


Section I - INTELLIGENCE HIGHLIGHTS

Germany Dumps 70-Year No-Spying Pact. Chancellor Angela Merkel's government is planning to scrap a no-spy agreement Germany has held with Britain and the United States since 1945 in response to an embarrassing US-German intelligence service scandal which has deeply soured relations between Berlin and Washington.

The unprecedented change to Berlin's counter-espionage policy was announced by Ms. Merkel's Interior Minister, Thomas de Maizière. He said that Berlin wanted "360‑degree surveillance" of all intelligence-gathering operations in Germany.

The intelligence services of the Allied victors, the United States, Britain and France, have hitherto been regarded as "friendly" to Germany. Their diplomatic and information-gathering activities were exempted from surveillance by Berlin's equivalent of M15 - the Bundesnachrichtendienst (BND).

But Mr. de Maizière told Bild that he was now not ruling out permanent German counter-espionage surveillance of US, British and French intelligence operations. His remarks were echoed by Stephan Mayer, a domestic security spokesman for Ms Merkel's ruling Christian Democrats. "We must focus more strongly on our so-called allies," he said. [Read more: Paterson/TheIndependent/7July2014]

Did Computers Stolen in Benghazi Attack Expose Sensitive Information? Computers were stolen from the U.S. compound in Benghazi during the 2012 terrorist attack, potentially exposing sensitive information and putting those who worked with American officials at risk, according to sources in Washington and on the ground in Libya.

"They took computers, computer devices. And I saw M-16 rifles, American rifles. I know they are American - we don't have them, we just have AK-47s - and a suitcase," said a Libyan who reported he had witnessed the attack.

He described what he saw on condition his identity was concealed.

His account of computers being stolen was confirmed by two sources in Washington familiar with the investigation into the attack. Fox News was told the computers are believed to be unclassified, and likely used for schedules and meetings as well as to document and process emails.

The hard drives would also contain a history of user names. [Read more: Herridge/FoxNews/2July2014]

Top-Secret Court to Weigh Ban on MI5 and GCHQ Spying on MPs in Public. Britain's most secretive court is to hold a rare public hearing to decide whether there is any legal force behind the long-standing political doctrine that the country's intelligence agencies cannot bug the phones or spy on the emails of members of parliament.

The Investigatory Powers Tribunal agreed to the hearing after two Green party parliamentarians - Caroline Lucas, MP for Brighton Pavilion, and Lady Jones of Moulsecoomb - complained that disclosures by the whistleblower Edward Snowden made it clear that GCHQ was capturing their communications in breach of the so-called Wilson Doctrine.

Kate Grange, counsel for GCHQ, MI5 and MI6, told the IPT on Tuesday that her clients wanted to reserve the right to make submissions on the issue in "closed" - or secret - session, with the public and the media excluded. "It may well be that we would want to say something in closed about the past policy or practice in relation to the Wilson Doctrine," she said.

The convention is named after former prime minister Harold Wilson, who pledged in 1966 that MPs' and peers' phones would not be tapped. In December 1997, then prime minister Tony Blair said the doctrine extended to electronic communication, including emails. [Read more: Cobain/TheGuardian/1July2014]

NSA's Internet Monitoring Said to Be Legal. The first time the bipartisan Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board dissected a National Security Agency surveillance program, it found fundamental flaws, arguing in a January report that the NSA's collection of domestic calling records "lacked a viable legal foundation" and should be shut down.

But in its latest study, the five-member board takes the opposite view of a different set of NSA programs revealed last year by former NSA systems administrator Edward Snowden.

The new report, which the board was to vote on Wednesday, found that the NSA's collection of Internet data within the United States passes constitutional muster and employs "reasonable" safeguards designed to protect the rights of Americans.

The board, whose members were appointed by President Barack Obama, largely endorsed a set of NSA surveillance programs that have provoked worldwide controversy since Snowden disclosed them. However, the board's report said some aspects of the programs raise privacy concerns meriting new internal intelligence agency safeguards. [Read more: Dilanian/AP/2July2014]

CIA Had Role in Germany Spy Affair. The Central Intelligence Agency was involved in a spying operation against Germany that led to the alleged recruitment of a German intelligence official and has prompted renewed outrage in Berlin, two U.S. officials familiar with the matter said on Monday.

CIA Director John Brennan has asked to brief key members of the U.S. Congress on the matter, which threatens a new rupture between Washington and a close European ally, one of the officials said.

It was unclear if and when Brennan's briefing to U.S. lawmakers would take place. The CIA declined any comment on the matter.

The office of Germany's Federal Prosecutor, based in the western city of Karlsruhe, late last week issued a statement saying that a 31-year old man had been arrested on suspicion of being a foreign spy, and that investigations were continuing. The statement offered no further details. [Read more: Hosenball/Reuters/7July2014]

Security Fears Loom Over CIA Report. Security concerns are complicating the release of a controversial report on "enhanced interrogations techniques," with officials fearing the document could inflame the Arab Street and put Americans in danger.

The White House and the CIA are working on final redactions to a 481-page executive summary of the investigation, which was conducted by Democrats on the Senate Intelligence Committee but boycotted by Republicans, who dispute its findings.

A congressional staffer said the report wouldn't be ready for a "couple of weeks," while the CIA said the declassification process should be finished by August 29th. 

While an August release seems unlikely, putting the report out in early September might not be an option, as it would fall near the anniversary of the 9/11 attacks - a day when terrorist groups typically attempt to strike, as they did two years ago in Benghazi, Libya. [Read more: Wong/TheHill/6July2014]

Lawyer: Senator and Dominican Prostitutes Story Cooked up By Cuban Intelligence Agents. Sen. Robert Menendez, dogged by a federal corruption probe, was the target of a Cuban intelligence smear plot that managed to fool the FBI and media into investigating.

That's the allegation from Menendez's lawyer, who has asked the Justice Department to investigate, a person familiar with the request confirmed to CNN. 

It's a dramatic twist to an already sensational story that involved allegations that Menendez, a New Jersey Democrat, traveled to have sex with underage Dominican prostitutes. Those stories, shopped to journalists around Washington for months, were published on a conservative news website before the purported prostitutes recanted and the FBI found no merit in the matter. 

It also may throw a wrench into an already complicated investigation of Menendez by the FBI in New Jersey and overseen by the Justice Department's public integrity unit. Investigators are examining Menendez's relationship with a political donor whose ophthalmology practice in Florida has been scrutinized for its billing practices. [Read more: Perez/CNN/8July2014]


Section II - CONTEXT & PRECEDENCE

Soviet Defector's Trove of KGB Secrets Made Public. The papers spent years hidden in a milk churn beneath a Russian dacha and read like an encyclopedia of Cold War espionage.

Original documents from one of the biggest intelligence leaks in history - a who's who of Soviet spying - were released Monday after being held in secret for two decades.

The files smuggled out of Russia in 1992 by senior KGB official Vasili Mitrokhin describe sabotage plots, booby-trapped weapons caches and armies of agents under cover in the West - the real-life inspiration for the fictional Soviet moles in The Americans TV series.

In reality, top-quality spies could be hard to get. The papers reveal that some were given Communist honors and pensions by a grateful USSR, but others proved loose-lipped, drunk or unreliable.

Intelligence historian Christopher Andrew said the vast dossier, released by the Churchill Archives Centre at Cambridge University, was considered "the most important single intelligence source ever" by British and American authorities. [Read more: Lawless/AP/6July2014]

CIA Employee's Disclosure Push 'Destroyed My Entire Career'. His CIA career included assignments in Africa, Afghanistan and Iraq, but the most perilous posting for Jeffrey Scudder turned out to be a two-year stint in a sleepy office that looks after the agency's historical files.

It was there that Scudder discovered a stack of articles, hundreds of histories of long-dormant conflicts and operations that he concluded were still being stored in secret years after they should have been shared with the public.

To get them released, Scudder submitted a request under the Freedom of Information Act - a step that any citizen can take, but one that is highly unusual for a CIA employee. Four years later, the CIA has released some of those articles and withheld others. It also has forced Scudder out.

His request set in motion a harrowing sequence. He was confronted by supervisors and accused of mishandling classified information while assembling his FOIA request. His house was raided by the FBI and his family's computers seized. Stripped of his job and his security clearance, Scudder said he agreed to retire last year after being told that if he refused, he risked losing much of his pension. [Read more: Miller/WashingtonPost/5July2014]

Japan's Public Security Intelligence Agency Features Anime-style Characters in Recruitment Pamphlet. Public Security Intelligence Agency is Japan's primary counterintelligence/counterterrorism organization. Based on the Subversive Activities Prevention Act, the agency conducts intelligence activities regarding those organizations which have a potential for subversive terrorist activities. The surprising change in its latest recruitment pamphlet, which is now available on its official website, is that, unlike the previous years, it features two anime-style characters for the first time.

It is not uncommon anymore to find anime-style (sometimes very moe) characters in promotional campaigns by public agencies in Japan, like the mascot characters of Ministry of Public Management, Home Affairs, Posts and Telecommunications we recently reported. But from the public image of the agency, this approach is a surprise to many. What do you think? [Read more: Komatsu/CrunchyRoll/4July2014]

Writing Tips From the CIA's Ruthless Style Manual. Strunk & White, it turns out, were CIA sources. The authors of The Elements of Style, a classic American writing guide, are cited alongside Henry Fowler, Wilson Follett, and Jacques Barzun in the Directorate of Intelligence's Style Manual & Writers Guide for Intelligence Publications, whose eighth edition (from 2011) was posted online last week following a Freedom of Information Act request. So what role do partisans in the usage wars have in a guide produced by an intelligence agency with a hidden hand in many real-life conflicts?

Though the CIA may dissemble as a matter of course, it speaks plainly to policymakers and operations officers - its "customers," in the language of the manual. The foreword begins, "Good intelligence depends in large measure on clear, concise writing. The information CIA gathers and the analysis it produces mean little if we cannot convey them effectively."

As revealed in the manual, the CIA is a prescriptivist scold, a believer in the serial comma, and a champion of "crisp and pungent" language "devoid of jargon." It takes a firm stand against false titles used attributively and urges intelligence writers to lowercase the w in Vietnam war ("undeclared"). 

Like any style guide, whether it's produced for a magazine or a government agency, this one reflects its authors' environment and biases. The missile-related acronyms ABM, ICBM, IRBM, SAM, SLBM, and SRBM are all deemed well-known enough not to have to spell out. "US imperialism" gets scare quotes. Most jarring are the often bellicose usage examples, which are littered with protests, human rights positions, free enterprise, surface ship deployments, oilfields, and bombs.

For more insight into how the CIA writes - and thinks - Quartz collected some notable entries from the 190-page document: [Read more: Silverberg/Quartz/8July2014]

Meet Melita, the Spy Who Came In From the Co-Op. She was dubbed the Spy Who Came In From The Co-Op but for years Melita Norwood's neighbours regarded her as an ordinary, if eccentric, widow.

Aged 87 by the time she was unmasked as a former Soviet spy in 1999, Norwood would drink her tea from a Che Guevara mug and deliver copies of the communist daily newspaper, the Morning Star, to friends and neighbours of her home Bexleyheath, south east London.

But while her political leanings were clear, few would have suspected Norwood - codenamed Hola - was the most important female agent ever recruited by the USSR.

It was only when MI5 recruited Professor Christopher Andrew, an intelligence historian, to study the Vasili Mitrokhin archive that her secret identity was made public. [Read more: HeraldScotland/7July2014]

Who's the New Guy Running the NSA? Admiral Michael Rogers, the relatively new head of the National Security Agency (NSA), made headlines last week for publicly downplaying the significance of the Edward Snowden leaks.

Actually, he didn't really downplay them - he just didn't up-play them as much as his predecessor, General Keith Alexander, who called the leaks "the greatest damage to our combined nations' intelligence systems that we have ever suffered" and is going around calling Snowden a Russian spy.

By contrast, the new guy is playing it cool. Rogers has been on the job for about three months, and he's been exceedingly diplomatic and measured. "A broad dialogue about what we're doing and why is a good thing for our nation," he said at the Bloomberg Government Cybersecurity Summit. "I don't question that for one minute."

In addition to serving as the face of public relations for the Defense Department's "silent service," Rogers has taken on two formal roles that come bundled with the NSA director position: head of the Central Security Service, another arm of the US' 17-tentacled intelligence apparatus, and commander of US Cyber Command, the hub of the military's cyber efforts.

That means one man is in charge of the NSA's domestic and foreign surveillance, along with defending US government networks, coordinating cyberattacks against enemies, and supervising what is essentially the security IT department for the rest of the Defense Department.

So, who is he? [Read more: Jeffries/TheVerge/7July2014]


Section III - COMMENTARY

Putin's Secret Weapon. There are two ways an espionage agency can prove its worth to the government it serves. Either it can be truly useful (think: locating a most-wanted terrorist), or it can engender fear, dislike, and vilification from its rivals (think: being named a major threat in congressional testimony). But when a spy agency does both, its worth is beyond question.

Since the Ukraine crisis began, the Kremlin has few doubts about the importance of the GRU, Russia's military intelligence apparatus. The agency has not only demonstrated how the Kremlin can employ it as an important foreign-policy tool, by ripping a country apart with just a handful of agents and a lot of guns. The GRU has also shown the rest of the world how Russia expects to fight its future wars: with a mix of stealth, deniability, subversion, and surgical violence. Even as GRU-backed rebel groups in eastern Ukraine lose ground in the face of Kiev's advancing forces, the geopolitical landscape has changed. The GRU is back in the global spook game and with a new playbook that will be a challenge for the West for years to come.

Recent years had not been kind to the Main Intelligence Directorate of the General Staff, the Glavnoe Razvedyvatelnoe Upravlenie (GRU). Once, it had been arguably Russia's largest intelligence agency, with self-contained stations -- known as "residencies" -- in embassies around the world, extensive networks of undercover agents, and nine brigades of special forces known as Spetsnaz. [Read more: Gallioti/ForeignPolicy/7July2014]

A Double Agent in Germany. Germany is again complaining about possible U.S. intelligence activities on its soil. The boys at BND (Bundesnachrichtendienst) or Federal Intelligence Service, found a suspected double agent on their payroll working for U.S. intelligence. In what appears as a sloppy handling traced directly to the U.S. embassy, the German government accuses Washington of obtaining some 218 documents through one yet unnamed 31 year old, mid-level intelligence official (an employ in custody) who stole and sold information about Germany's parliamentary inquiry into the NSA.

Interestingly, the information was not even sensitive and naturally the U.S. would be curious at what Germany is doing; especially in regards to closed Parliamentary committee hearings. Basically, Germany is accusing the Americans of looking over their shoulder here in a friendly spat of curiosity and they demand clarification in the matter. Officially, however, they have not named the foreign power in connection to the arrest, while they have summoned Ambassador John B. Emerson.

'It would be an unheard of attack on the freedom of parliament and our democratic institutions in general," said the SPD parliamentary chief, Thomas Oppermann. "The US now has an obligation to clarify what happened."

That is one of the more ridiculous political statements you will find playing to the domestic German public outrage. The German intelligence agency spies on Congress and other "democratic" institutions like the UN on a regular basis. That is what foreign intelligence agencies do. Germany has been implemented as a partner in many intelligence and counterterrorism joint efforts involving the NSA. [Read more: Shehadey/InHomelandSecurity/7July2014]

Witch Hunts Aren't Cheap. Politico reports this morning that the House Republicans' new Benghazi committee hasn't made many headlines lately, "but the silence doesn't mean the investigation is fading away." On the contrary, the GOP's latest panel - the eighth congressional committee to investigate the 2012 attack in Libya - is reportedly "ramping up" behind the scenes, hiring aides, examining subpoenas, and reaching out to agencies for information.

For those who have no use for the discredited conspiracy theories, this may seem pointless. The committee's chairman says he has questions about the deadly assault in Benghazi, but all of those questions have already been answered. Given that there's real work Congress should at least try to do, investing energy in yet another committee to hold yet another round of hearings, going over the same information yet again, seems wasteful.

Sure, Republicans will get some fundraising letters out of this, and Fox News will be excited, but couldn't GOP lawmakers find a better use for their time?

USA Today's Paul Singer reported last night, however, that the Republican-led House isn't just investing time and energy into this endeavor. It turns out, witch hunts are expensive. [Read more: Benen/MSNBC/8July2014]

Iraq: Policy Failure, Not Intelligence Failure. Inaccurate analysis over the last week claims that the current crisis in Iraq is the result of a failure of U.S. intelligence.

An article in the Huffington Post on June 30 by Michael Brenner drops the bombshell that, "The big unreported story of the Iraqi crisis is the failure of American intelligence agencies to foresee the ISIS campaign. Indeed, the ISIS phenomenon from its emergence two years ago until now has largely passed under the radar of the CIA, NSA et al."

The Washington Free Beacon quoted Bill Cowan, a former Special Forces officer who worked as a contractor in Iraq, as saying, "This is an absolute intelligence failure on the part of the CIA."

Both those statements, and other echoes of the same sentiment, are dead wrong and woefully misinformed. [Read more: Ruth/CommDigiNews/2July2014]


Section IV - Upcoming Events


Upcoming AFIO Events


AFIO EDUCATIONAL EVENTS IN COMING TWO MONTHS....

Tuesday, 08 July 2014 - MacDill AFB, FL - The AFIO Suncoast Chapter hosts USCENTCOM Chief of the Joint Cyber Center on "the Rise of Cyber to a Warfighting Domain."

COL John Burger is Chief of the Joint Cyber Center at United States Central Command responsible for the planning, integration and execution of cyberspace operations in the USCENTCOM AOR. He leads a staff of 115 military, civilians and contractors to assure the CDRs freedom of maneuver in cyberspace and deny the same to our adversaries. He designs and Implements information assurance programs to secure cyber key terrain, and develops defensive cyberspace plans to “see, block, and maneuver” defensive forces against threats to friendly networks. Working with our Allies and Partners, he develops Cyber Security Cooperation plans to enable our partners to protect themselves in cyberspace. He integrates cyberspace force application with the air, land, and maritime domains in support of OPLANs. He interacts daily with the Joint Staff, USCYBERCOM, the Intelligence Community, and the Interagency. COL Burger serves as principal advisor to the CENTCOM Commander on all cyberspace matters.
Following his graduation from the US Military Academy at West Point, COL Burger began his career in A Co, 13th ENGR BN, Fort Ord, CA., and then was assigned tours with 10th ENGR BN, Schweinfurt, Germany. COL Burger arrived at MacDill AFB in 2009 as the Regional Manager Southeast Regional Support Center, Defense Intelligence Agency, followed by assignments as Chief, Cyber Security Division, and then Chief, Joint Cyber Center, US Central Command.
COL Burger will address the rise of cyber to a DoD warfighting domain with particular emphasis on the intelligence aspects.

LOCATION: MacDill AFB Surf’s Edge Club, 7315 Bayshore Blvd, MacDill AFB, FL 33621. Please RSVP to the Chapter Secretary no later than Wednesday, July 2, for yourself and include the names and email addresses of any guests. Email or call Michael Shapiro at michaels@suncoastafio.org, the Chapter Secretary. You will receive a confirmation via email. If you do not, contact the Chapter Secretary to confirm your registration. Check-in at noon; opening ceremonies, lunch and business meeting at 1230 hours, followed by our speaker.
FEE: You must present your $20 check payable to “Suncoast Chapter, AFIO” (or cash) at check-in to cover the luncheon. If you make a reservation, don’t cancel and get a cancellation confirmation by the response deadline and then don’t show up, you will be responsible for the cost of the luncheon.

10 July 2014, 1830 hrs - Miami, FL - The New Ted Shackley Miami-Dade County Chapter Hosts Organizational Meeting.

We invite all current AFIO members in the Miami/Ft Lauderdale/Homestead areas to attend an event planning meeting on July 10, 2014 at 1830 in the Doral area of Miami. Purpose of the meeting is to gather input on the organization of a stellar inaugural event, to be held later in the summer with some very special invitees.
Those wishing to attend should kindly RSVP to tsmdc.afio@gmail.com in order to receive a formal personal invitation. Please include your national membership number and updated contact information in your correspondence.
Chapter membership applications will be available at this and all future meetings, as well as on our website (when launched). We look forward to your participation in advancing interest in and knowledge about the Intelligence Community.
Email: tsmdc.afio@gmail.com
Address: 11410 NW 20 St., Suite 220, Miami, FL 33172
Facebook Page: /AFIO-Ted-Shackley-Miami-Dade-Chapter
Twitter: @AFIOMiamiDade

Thursday, 17 July 2014, 11:30 am - Palmer Lake, CO - The AFIO Rocky Mountain Chapter hears Sheriff-Elect Bill Elder.

Our speaker is Bill Elder, Sheriff-Elect at the caucus who is running unopposed in November; therefore, he will be our next Sheriff of El Paso County unless a huge write-in campaign is undertaken. This is an excellent chance to meet the new Sheriff and get to know more about him and his background.
Location: The Inn on the Palmer Divide, 443 S Highway 105, Palmer Lake, CO 80133 ~ Phone: 719-481-1800.
Exit I-25 at Exit 161 for Monument and Palmer Lake. Go North of SH 105 towards Palmer Lake. You will receive additional directions when you RSVP to Tom Van Wormer at robsmom@pcisys.net. The lunch will cost $12.00. You can pay at the door.

14 August 2014, 11:30 a.m. - San Francisco, CA - The AFIO San Francisco "Andre LeGallo" Chapter hosts Capt. Welton Chang, DoD Analyst and Ph.D. student at the University of Pennsylvania.

Topic: Predicting War and Peace: Inside the Massive IARPA Political Forecasting Experiment - Exploring the Frontiers of Optimal Political Forecasting. In 2011, IARPA sponsored a tournament to test a big idea: can people predict political outcomes? If so, how? Come learn how the tournament has progressed over the last three years from a participant in the project. Capt. Welton Chang will discuss the experimental set up, findings, and implications for intelligence and policy making. 

11:30AM no host cocktails; meeting starts at noon. Please note new meeting location: Basque Cultural Center, 599 Railroad Avenue, South San Francisco, CA 94080. RSVP required by 8/1/14 to Mariko Kawaguchi: e-mail afiosf@aol.com with meal choice (Salmon with Champagne Sauce or Veal Roast au Jus) and mail check made out to "AFIO" to: Mariko Kawaguchi, P.O. Box 117578, Burlingame, CA 94011. Members and students: $25; non-member guests $35.

21 August 2014, 12:30pm - Los Angeles, CA - AFIO – Los Angeles hosts LAPD Police Chief Bernard Parks on Aerial Surveillance Platforms

The chapter will host Bernard Parks, former Chief of Police of the L.A.P.D. (Los Angeles Police Dept.) and current member of the Los Angeles City Council, to discuss the current state of safety in the city of Los Angeles and future limited use of aerial surveillance platforms (UAV-Drones), and the impact it will have on the future of local law enforcement in L.A.
Location for the meeting: LAPD-ARTC 5651 W Manchester Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90045, Start Time:12.30 PM, Room 1E.
Please RSVP for attendance: afio_LA@yahoo.com

For Additional Events two+ months or greater....view our online Calendar of Events

Other Upcoming Events

MANY more International Spy Museum Events in 2014 with full details are listed on the AFIO Website at www.afio.com.

Wednesday, 09 July 2014, noon - Washington, DC - Global Terrorism, Espionage and Cybersecurity Update, at the International Spy Museum

Be the first to learn the latest intelligence news! Join David Major, retired FBI agent and former director of Counterintelligence, Intelligence and Security Programs, for a briefing on the hottest intelligence and security issues, breaches, and penetrations. Presented in partnership with The Centre for Counterintelligence and Security Studies (CI Centre), these updates will cover worldwide events such as breaking espionage cases and arrest reports, cyber espionage incidents, and terrorist activity. Learn Snowden’s current status and what could happen next with this case. Major uses his expertise to analyze trends and highlight emerging issues of interest to both intelligence and national security professionals and the public. Cases are drawn from the CI Centre’s SPYPEDIA®, the most comprehensive source of espionage information in the world, containing events and information that may not be reported by mainstream media outlets. Major will also highlight and review the latest books and reports to keep you current on what is hitting think tank desks.
Tickets: Free! No registration required. Visit www.spymuseum.org

Friday, 11 July 2014, 1 - 4 pm - Washington, DC - Meet former FBI/CIA Counterintelligence Officer, Christopher Lynch

Christopher Lynch was a Counterintelligence Officer, first in the FBI, and then in the CIA, for thirty years. As an Operations Analyst, he specialized in the KGB in assessing tradecraft and in detecting hostile control.
Free. No registration required. More info and directions at www.spymuseum.org

Tuesday, 15 July 2014, noon - Washington, DC - Kenneth Daigler discusses Spies, Patriots, and Traitors: American Intelligence in the Revolutionary War at the International Spy Museum

Nathan Hale and Benedict Arnold may be the most famous spies of the American Revolution, but they were hardly alone. George Washington’s use of spy networks and wider intelligence efforts were critical to the fight for independence. In Spies, Patriots, and Traitors, former CIA officer Kenneth Daigler closely examines American intelligence activities during the era of the Revolutionary War from 1765 to 1783. Daigler will explain how America’s founders learned and practiced their intelligence role, providing insight from an intelligence professional’s perspective and revealing how many of the principles of the era’s intelligence practice are still relevant today. After the talk, see the Museum’s famous George Washington spy letter.
Free. No registration required. More info and directions at www.spymuseum.org

Tuesday, 15 July 2014, 4:30pm - Washington, DC - "How to Conduct a Foreign Counterintelligence Investigation" by Dennis D. Staszak, Former Deputy Unit Chief, Foreign Counterintelligence and Counterterrorism Training Unit, FBI

Dennis Staszak is a 33 year veteran of the Federal Bureau of Investigation and has investigated numerous criminal and national security matters. He specializes in foreign counterintelligence investigations, and previously served as the Deputy Unit Chief of the FBI's Foreign Counterintelligence and Counterterrorism Training Unit. Prior to retirement, Professor Staszak instructed new agents and senior police executives at the FBI Academy, FBI National Academy, and many international police training facilities. Starting March, 2007, Professor Staszak has taught a graduate course in Intelligence Theory and Applications for Law Enforcement Managers attending the FBI National Academy.
He currently serves as Assistant Dean and Professor of National Security and Administration of Justice studies at the Northern Virginia Community College, and an Adjunct Faculty member teaching Intelligence Analysis and Counterintelligence Concepts at George Mason University.
Prof. Staszak is a graduate of Criminal Justice Studies at the University of Wisconsin. He received a Master of Arts degree in the area of International Transactions from George Mason University, Fairfax, Virginia, a Master of Science degree in Strategic Intelligence Studies from the National Intelligence University, Washington, D.C., and has done graduate work at the University of Virginia and The Institute of World Politics.
He previously served for three years on active duty in the United States Army during the Vietnam War era, and is a graduate of advanced language studies at the Defense Language Institute.
Where: The Institute of World Politics, 1521 16th St NW, Washington, DC 20036.
Please contact sdwyer@iwp.edu with any questions.

15 July 2014, 11:30 am - McLean, VA - Defense Intelligence Forum hears Cal Carnes on "The Insider Threat."

Mr. Cal Carnes will speak on “The Insider Threat.” His presentation will show that the Insider Threat is a malicious threat to an organization that comes from people within the organization, such as employees, former employees, contractors or business associates, who have inside information concerning the organization’s security practices, data and computer systems. He appreciates the gravity of this threat because of his long involvement in counterintelligence issues. His work in intelligence began in January 1968 at Arlington Hall Station where he worked Military Capabilities. In 1972 he worked at the National Photographic Interpretation Center and in 1974 he moved to the Military Intelligence Center at the Pentagon. After this time he worked counterintelligence issues at the Soviet/Warsaw Pact Division, DIA Counterintelligence Division, FBI and Naval Investigative Service. Cal retired from the Army 902d MI Group in 2001 after working for the Army Counterintelligence Center. As a defense contractor, he worked for the Defense HUMINT Service and the Counterintelligence Field Activity. He is now a part-time independent contractor for the Joint Counterintelligence Training Academy and the Joint Military Attaché School as a role player. He holds master degrees from Georgetown University in National Security Studies and the National Intelligence College.

This forum will follow a modified Chatham House rule. You may use the information, but with the exception of speaker's name and subject, you may make no attribution. Everything will be off the record.

Location: Pulcinella Restaurant, 6852 Old Dominion Drive, McLean, VA Pay at the door with a check for $29.00 payable to DIAA, Inc
Registration starts at 1130 AM, lunch at 1200 PM.

Make reservations by 12 JULY 2014 by email to diforum@diaalumni.org. Include names, telephone numbers, and email addresses. For each attendee, choose among chicken cacciatore, tilapia puttanesca, lasagna, sausage with peppers, or fettuccini with portabella for your luncheon selection.
Pay at the door with a check for $ 29.00 per person, payable to DIAA, Inc.

Wednesday, 16 July 2014, 6:30 pm - Washington, DC - Exploring the Covert Capital with Prof. Friedman - at the International Spy Museum

“His Monument is Around You.” - Dulles memorial inscription at CIA Headquarters
Washington, DC, may be the United States’ official capital, but the northern Virginia area is the covert capital of a secret empire. Anchored at one end on the Pentagon and at the other on CIA headquarters, the area has been profoundly affected in its architecture, culture, and politics by the covert business done there, business which touches every part of the globe. Join Professor Andrew Friedman of Haverford College for a fascinating discussion of an aspect of the secret world of espionage that you probably never considered: architecture. Afterwards, Professor Friedman will sign his book Covert Capital: Landscapes of Denial and the Making of U.S. Empire in the Suburbs of Northern Virginia, and you can examine photographs from the secret files of the International Spy Museum showing long-gone classified CIA facilities around the Washington area.
Reservations at www.spymuseum.org Tickets: $8

Friday, 25 July 2014, 1 - 4 pm - Washington, DC - Meet A Spy: Tony & Jonna Mendez, the real CIA Officers behind the movie ARGO

Meet the Mendezes - Tony and Jonna - both are former CIA Chiefs of Disguise, responsible for changing the identity and appearance of thousands of clandestine operatives around the world. Tony is most famous for his rescue of American diplomats from Tehran during the Iranian Hostage Crisis as depicted in the film ARGO.
Free. No registration required. More info and directions at www.spymuseum.org


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