AFIO Weekly Intelligence Notes #32-13 dated 20 August 2013

[Editors' Note: The WIN editors attempt to include a wide range of articles and commentary in the Weekly Notes to inform and educate our readers. However, the views expressed in the articles are purely those of the authors, and in no way reflect support or endorsement from the WIN editors or the AFIO officers and staff. We welcome comments from the WIN readers on any and all articles and commentary.]
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CONTENTS

Section I - INTELLIGENCE HIGHLIGHTS

Section II - CONTEXT & PRECEDENCE

Section III - COMMENTARY

Section IV - Jobs

Section V - Coming Events

Coming Educational Events

Current Calendar for Next Two Months ONLY

 

The Central Intelligence Agency
and Smith College Invite AFIO Members

to a special conference

Please RSVP for this no-cost CIA Document Release Event at Smith College

From Typist to Trailblazer
The Evolving View of Women in the CIA's Workforce

A CIA Historical Documents 'Release Event' Conference
co-hosted with Smith College, Northampton, Massachusetts

Wednesday, October 30, 2013, 4 - 6pm EDT

RSVP here

Smith College
Carroll Room, Campus Center
Northampton, Massachusetts

From Typist to Trailblazer: The Evolving View of Women in the CIA's Workforce is a collection of declassified documents shedding light on the CIA's efforts to examine and address the status of its women employees from 1947 to today. The first study to look at career opportunities for women was completed in 1953, just six years after the Agency's establishment. This Panel on career Service for Women was dubbed the "Petticoat Panel," and a lightly redacted version of their final report is included in the collection. From its inception, the CIA has been a forerunner in the federal government in women's and minority rights initiatives. These initiatives, along with numerous meeting minutes and memos, reflect conversations that were also happening on the national level. The timely release of these documents includes some discussion about what challenges remain for the Agency to day, and how it is currently working to implement change.

Features release of newly declassified documents [which will be made available later on a CIA website microsite - address supplied in the booklet], a printed booklet of the program, and a panel of distinguished speakers.

There is no fee to attend this event. Generous nearby no-cost parking.

Full details on the conference are here.

If you think you would like to attend this event, please RSVP here.


The Two Day Cryptographic History Event of the Year

"Technological Change and Cryptology: Meeting the Historical Challenges"

NSA's 2013 Cryptologic History Symposium, 17-18 October 2013
Laurel, Maryland

      The Center for Cryptologic History hosts a biennial international symposium in October during odd-numbered years. The speakers and audience are a mix of outside scholars, current practitioners, retired veterans, and interested members of the public. Past symposia have had presenters from over a dozen countries.

      The theme for the 2013 symposium, to be held on October 17-18 at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory's Kossiakoff Conference Center (just west of Laurel, Maryland) is "Technological Change and Cryptology: Meeting the Historical Challenges." The conference will include sessions on "A Tribute to Alan Turing," a "Roundtable on Cyber History," "Bletchley Park," "COMINT and the Civil War," "The Cryptologic Legacy of the Great War Era," "SIGINT and the Vietnam War Era," and "A Technological Advantage: Historical Perspectives on Cryptologic Research and Development."

      In all there will be 21 separate sessions and over 70 presentations. Speakers will include scholars such as David Kahn and cryptologic pioneers such as Whitfield Diffie.

      All symposium sessions are unclassified and open to the registered public. A complete agenda and registration information will be available here at the website or by contacting the Center for Cryptologic History at 301-688-2336 or via email at history@nsa.gov.

      Note also that the National Cryptologic Museum Foundation has an excellent program the day before - 16 October - at the same venue.


"Safeguarding Intelligence"

Theme of the National Cryptological Museum Foundation's Annual Membership Meeting

16 October 2013
Laurel, Maryland

Details on the speakers, agenda and other events will be provided as soon as they become available.

The Meeting will be held at the Kossiakoff Center, JHU/APL, 11100 John Hopkins Rd, Laurel, MD 20723, 240-228-7574

The fee for NCMF members is $20 and for non members $50 which includes one year membership in the NCMF.  The fee includes breakfast, lunch and refreshments at the morning break.  There will also be A.M and P.M. shuttle service to and from the parking lot.

You can register securely online here on the donation page, or you can download and complete the Registration form and mail to the NCMF at PO Box 1682, Ft. George G. Meade, MD 20755.  Call 301-688-5436 for assistance or send an email to cryptmf@aol.com


Traveling this year or next? Business of pleasure? Before you do....

A few spaces remain but you must register by Wednesday 21 Aug

This FRIDAY, 23 August 2013

Badge Pick-up at 10:30 a.m.
Register HERE

11 a.m. speaker

Luke Bencie

on
Counter-Espionage and Consulting: Spy vs. Spy in Globalized Business 

author

Among Enemies: Counter-Espionage for the Business Traveler.

For the past 15 years, Bencie has traveled to over 100 countries on behalf of the U.S. Intelligence Community and private defense industry. A veteran of espionage struggles, he knows intimately the threats business and government travelers face.

3-course Lunch at Noon


1 p.m. speaker

Letitia A. Long

Director
National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency

The National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) delivers geospatial intelligence to policymakers, warfighters, intelligence professionals, and first responders. NGA is a unique combination of intelligence agency and combat support agency. Anyone who sails a U.S. ship, flies a U.S. aircraft, makes national policy decisions, fights wars, locates targets, responds to natural disasters, or even navigates with a cellphone relies on NGA.

Check-in for badge pickup at 10:30 a.m.

Luke Bencie begins his presentation at 11 a.m. Lunch served at noon. NGA Director Long begins her presentation at 1 pm.

Morning and Afternoon programs are On The Record.

The latest intelligence books, and many others, for sale throughout event. Event closes at 2 p.m.

Complete a Registration Form HERE
EVENT LOCATION: The Crowne Plaza
1960 Chain Bridge Road, McLean, Virginia 22102
Driving directions here or use this link: http://tinyurl.com/boey9vf
 

Section I - INTELLIGENCE HIGHLIGHTS

In Declassified Document, CIA Acknowledges Role in '53 Iran Coup. Sixty years after the overthrow of Iranian Prime Minister Mohammad Mossadegh, a declassified CIA document acknowledges that the agency was involved in the 1953 coup.

The independent National Security Archive research institute, which published the document Monday, says the declassification is believed to mark the CIA's first formal acknowledgment of its involvement.

The documents, declassified in 2011 and given to George Washington University research group under the Freedom of Information Act, come from the CIA's internal history of Iran from the mid-1970s and paint a detailed picture of how the CIA worked to oust Mossadegh.

In a key line pointed out by Malcom Byrne, the editor who worked through the documents, the CIA spells out its involvement in the coup. "The military coup that overthrew Mossadeq and his National Front cabinet was carried out under CIA direction as an act of U.S. foreign policy, conceived and approved at the highest levels of government," the document says, using a variation of the spelling of Mossadegh's name.

While this might be the CIA's first formal nod, the U.S. role has long been known. [Read more: Merica&Hanna/CNN/19August2013]

Obama Directs Intel Community to Examine Advances in Communications Capabilities. President Obama released a presidential memorandum on August 12 which instructed the Intelligence Community to examine whether advances in communications technologies in recent years have enabled the U.S. to improve its intelligence-gathering capabilities while continuing to safeguard individual liberties.

He ordered the Director of National Intelligence, James Clapper, to establish a "Review Group on Intelligence and Communications Technologies" that would study this question and provide its interim findings within 60 days and its final report by December 15, 2013.

"Recent years have brought unprecedented and rapid advancements in communications technologies, particularly with respect to global telecommunications," said the president. "These technological advances have brought with them both great opportunities and significant risks for our Intelligence Community: opportunity in the form of enhanced technical capabilities that can more precisely and readily identify threats to our security, and risks in the form of insider and cyber threats." [Read more: Goodwin/GSN/14August2013]

CACI International Announces $480M in National Intelligence Contracts. CACI International Inc. (NYSE: CACI) announced it has been awarded over $480 million in contracts with federal government clients in the Intelligence Community during the company's Fiscal Year 2014 first quarter, which began on July 1, 2013 and will end September 30, 2013. With these contracts for national-level intelligence organizations serving the nation's security, CACI continues to expand its business in its high-volume intelligence market area.

Intelligence continues to be an important market for CACI. These awards emphasize system engineering, migration, testing, and operations. Additionally, the company will be providing software development and integration to support intelligence analysis, program management services, technical analysis, geospatial products and support, network operations, technical collection, and general mission support services. While specifics are classified, the awards provide mission services and mission support to a number of Intelligence Community members and to classified intelligence programs within the Department of Defense. [Read more: StreetInsider/14August2013]

NSA Establishes $60 Million Data Analytics Lab at NC State. As the field of "big data" continues to grow in importance, N.C. State University has landed a big coup - a major lab for the study of data analysis, funded by the National Security Agency.

A $60.75 million grant from the NSA is the largest research grant in NCSU's history - three times bigger than any previous award.

The Laboratory for Analytic Sciences will be launched in a Centennial Campus building that will be renovated with money from the federal agency, but details about the facility are top secret. Those who work in the lab will be required to have security clearance from the U.S. government.

NCSU officials say the endeavor is expected to bring 100 new jobs to the Triangle during the next several years. The university, already a leader in data science, won the NSA contract through a competitive process.

NCSU university already has strengths in computer science, applied mathematics and statistics and a collaborative project with the NSA on cybersecurity. The university also is in the process of hiring four faculty members for its new data-driven science cluster, adding to its expertise.

"It is a big deal," said NCSU Chancellor Randy Woodson. "It's a natural fit for us because as an institution we've been about data analysis and big data for a long time. I think the National Security Agency realized that when they selected us as a university partner." [Read more: Stancill/RaleighNews/16August2013]

Osama Bin Laden Photo Flap Heading to Supreme Court. The dispute of whether the Central Intelligence Agency must release as many as 52 images of a dead Osama bin Laden is heading to the Supreme Court.

The agency maintains that the pictures are classified, and that releasing them "could trigger violence, attacks, or acts of revenge against the United States." A lower court and a federal appeals court sided with the President Barack Obama administration.

The legal tussle dates to 2011, when Judicial Watch lodged a Freedom of Information Act claim with the government shortly after the president announced the United States had killed the alleged mastermind of the 2001 terror attacks. In response to the FOIA, the CIA said the images were classified, and refused to turn them over.

Judicial Watch sued, and a federal judge and appeals court sided with the agency's classification assertions. [Read more: Kravets/Wired/19August2013]

Prosecutors: Alleged Spy Jumped at "False Flag" Bait. Eight days after Robert Patrick Hoffman II walked into the FBI's field office in Norfolk last October and asked for help nabbing some Russian spies he thought were trying to recruit him, the retired sailor sent his handler an email.

"The power is out," read the email's subject line - a phrase his handler had previously told him to use if something was wrong.

If all was well, the subject was supposed to read, "Flowers are blooming," according to court documents.

Prosecutors highlighted the email Monday in U.S. District Court while trying to debunk defense assertions that Hoffman was interested in helping the government catch the Russian agents.

Hoffman - a retired petty officer 1st class from Virginia Beach charged with attempted espionage - is accused of passing classified information to undercover FBI agents posing as Russian intelligence officers. The crime carries a possible death sentence, but federal prosecutors say they will not pursue that penalty. [Read more: Daugherty/VirginianPilot/20August2013]

The Future of Navy Spy Tech.  The Navy's X-47B unmanned combat jet captured headlines and imaginations earlier this summer when it took off and then landed on the aircraft carrier U.S.S. George H.W. Bush. The event marked the first time an unmanned, autonomous aircraft has pulled off such a feat. In doing so, the sleek, stealthy, robotic X-47B ginned up a great deal of hype and speculation surrounding the future of naval aviation and the role these aircraft - still in their prototype phase - might play in future conflicts.

But meanwhile, the more immediate future of unmanned, autonomous maritime aviation - and a critical piece of the U.S. military's "pivot" to the Asia-Pacific region - is shaping up in Palmdale, Calif., where the Navy's MQ-4C Triton completed its fourth successful test flight last week. Autonomous aircraft plying the skies over the world's oceans are closer than many might think.

The differences between the Navy's long-term plan to field semi-stealthy combat drones and its far more immediate initiative to field a persistent reconnaissance capability over the world's oceans are myriad, but the reason they're worth mentioning in the same sentence is that both platforms demonstrate the absolutely massive impact that autonomous flight will have on civilian and military aviation in the years ahead. [Read more: Dillow/CNN/19August2013]


Section II - CONTEXT & PRECEDENCE

CIA Acknowledges Area 51 - But Not UFOs or Aliens. UFO buffs and believers in alien encounters are celebrating the CIA's clearest acknowledgement yet of the existence of Area 51, the top-secret Cold War test site that has been the subject of elaborate conspiracy theories for decades.

The recently declassified documents have set the tinfoil-hat crowd abuzz, though there's no mention in the papers of UFO crashes, black-eyed extraterrestrials or staged moon landings.

Audrey Hewins, an Oxford, Maine, woman who runs a support group for people like her who believe they have been contacted by extraterrestrials, said she suspects the CIA is moving closer to disclosing there are space aliens on Earth.

"I'm thinking that they're probably testing the waters now to see how mad people get about the big lie and cover-up," she said.

For a long time, U.S. government officials hesitated to acknowledge even the existence of Area 51. [AP/16August2013]

Covering the Undercovers: CIA Fellow Chronicles Intense World of Work That is Counterterrorism. Bridget Rose Nolan went through intense scrutiny to work as a graduate fellow for the CIA: an eight-hour polygraph, a 500-question psychological exam, probing interviews of family, friends, and neighbors, and, on her first day, a sweep of her car for explosives by guards toting AK-47s. All standard protocol. 

But that was nothing compared to what Nolan, then a sociology doctoral student at the University of Pennsylvania, would endure after deciding to study the agency and write her dissertation on it. 

The CIA assigned Nolan to the National Counterterrorism Center in Virginia, formed after 9/11 to help the nation's 16 intelligence groups share, integrate, and analyze information. As a counterterrorism analyst, she pored over cryptic messages from a variety of sources and wrote reports for policy makers. 

Nolan worked at the agency for three summers before proposing her examination of the counterterrorism center, a high-pressure world of code language and secrets as quirky as it was dark. 

"Really, someone should study this place," Nolan said to another analyst over lunch one day. "Wait a minute. I should study this place!" She set out to explore the culture of the terrorism center and how it, and its counterparts, share information - or fail to. [Read more: Snyder/PhiladelphiaInquirer/19August2013]

5 Decades Later, JFK Probe Files Still Sealed. Five decades after President John F. Kennedy was fatally shot and long after official inquiries ended, thousands of pages of investigative documents remain withheld from public view. The contents of these files are partially known - and intriguing - and conspiracy buffs are not the only ones seeking to open them for a closer look.

Some serious researchers believe the off-limits files could shed valuable new light on nagging mysteries of the assassination - including what U.S. intelligence agencies knew about accused assassin Lee Harvey Oswald before Nov. 22, 1963.

It turns out that several hundred of the still-classified pages concern a deceased CIA agent, George Joannides, whose activities just before the assassination and, fascinatingly, during a government investigation years later, have tantalized researchers for years.

"This is not about conspiracy, this is about transparency," said Jefferson Morley, a former Washington Post reporter and author embroiled in a decade-long lawsuit against the CIA, seeking release of the closed documents. "I think the CIA should obey the law. I don't think most people think that's a crazy idea."

Morley's effort has been joined by others, including G. Robert Blakey, chief counsel for a House investigation into the JFK assassination in the 1970s. But so far, the Joannides files and thousands more pages primarily from the CIA remain off-limits at a National Archives center in College Park, Md. [Read more: Porter/AP/17August2013]

The Secret History of the U-2. On Feb. 21, 1955, Richard M. Bissell, a senior CIA official, wrote a check on an agency account for $1.25 million and mailed it to the home of Kelly Johnson, chief engineer at the Lockheed Company's Burbank, Calif., plant. According to a newly declassified CIA history of the U-2 program, obtained under the Freedom of Information Act by the National Security Archive, the agency was about to sign a contract with Lockheed for $22.5 million to build 20 U-2 aircraft, but the company needed a cash infusion right away to keep the work going. Through the use of "unvouchered" funds - virtually free from any external oversight or accounting - the CIA could finance secret programs, such as the U-2. As it turned out, Lockheed produced the 20 aircraft at a total of $18,977,597 (including $1.9 million in profit), or less than $1 million per plane. In other words, the project came in under budget, a miracle in today's defense contracting world.

A source of deep pride for the U.S. intelligence community, the U-2 program survived the May 1, 1960, shoot-down of Francis Gary Powers over the Soviet Union, and the plane went on to spy for the CIA until 1974 - and the Air Force still operates the latest version today. Nevertheless, the agency has been holding back information about the U-2 for years. At a 1998 CIA-sponsored symposium to celebrate the U-2 program, one of the conference speakers was asked to refrain from mentioning how Chinese Nationalist pilots, based in Taiwan, flew agency U-2s over and near the People's Republic to gather intelligence on the PRC, including its nuclear programs. The speaker ignored the request, but that did not stop the CIA from maintaining that such information should remain officially classified. That position was reflected in a heavily redacted volume, "The CIA and the U-2 Program," which the agency released to the public at the time of the conference. [Read more: Richelson/ForeignPolicy/19August2013]

Ex-Spy Battles to Get Job Back. Choosing the right time in a new romance to reveal you're a secret agent can be tricky. But now a former Canberra ASIO operative says he was sacked for getting the timing wrong.

It is a tale of love, counter-espionage and workplace rights that looks set for a showdown in the Federal Court as the ex-secret agent battles to get his job back.

The man has warned that thousands of ASIO employees remain unaware they have been stripped by legislative changes of some of their appeal rights in workplace disputes, leaving them out in the cold if they lose their jobs.

ASIO rejects its former agent's claims, saying anyone sacked by the agency has several avenues of appeal and will be treated with procedural fairness. [Read more: Towell/CanberraTimes/21August2013]


Section III - COMMENTARY

Italy Should Pardon Former CIA Official Robert Seldon Lady. I represent Robert Seldon Lady, a former CIA officer who faces a 6-year Italian prison sentence in connection with the 2003 extraordinary rendition of an Egyptian terrorist suspect, Abu Omar, in Milan, Italy.

In 2007, Lady was tried in absentia in an Italian court, along with 23 other American defendants, and convicted of helping abduct Abu Omar.

The case is a travesty of justice targeting Lady and others who have devoted their lives to protecting Americans as well as Italians and others from radical Islamic terrorism.

Some background: Egyptian cleric Hassan Mustafa Osama Nasr, also known as Abu Omar, was a member of al-Gama'a al-Islamiyya, an anti-government organization that has been linked to the murder of Anwar Sadat in 1981 and the 1997 Luxor massacre that cost the lives of 62 people in Egypt, mostly tourists.

The cleric Omar Abdel-Rahman is the spiritual leader of the movement. He was accused of participating in the 1993 World Trade Center bombings and is serving a life sentence in the United States.

After Egypt declared the movement illegal, Abu Omar sought asylum in Italy. [Read more: Spencer/NewsMax/14August2013]

Time for Answers from the NSA. It's time to ask tough questions about the National Security Agency's surveillance activities - even for conservatives who have given the NSA the benefit of every doubt up until now.

The Washington Post opened a can of worms last Friday when it reported that, in 2012, an internal NSA audit found that the agency had violated privacy rules 2,776 times within just one year. The audit counted only violations at NSA's Washington facilities - nearly 20 other NSA facilities were not included. In the wake of the Post's report, the NSA insisted that the violations were "inadvertent," but it failed to explain why it had not shared the report with Senate Intelligence Committee chair Dianne Feinstein or other congressional oversight authorities.

Yet some NSA defenders continue to insist that nothing is wrong. Back in July, House Intelligence Committee chair Mike Rogers claimed that there have been "zero privacy violations" on the part of NSA. After the leaked audit made news on Friday, he retreated to saying that "there was no intentional and willful violation of the law."

Other NSA stalwarts have even decided to go on the attack against critics. [Read more: Fund/NationalReview/19August2013]

What did Edward Snowden Get Wrong? Everything. Edward Snowden is now out of his limbo at Moscow's airport, presumably ensconced in some Russian dacha, wondering what the next phase of his young life will bring. Having spent 30 years in the intelligence business, I fervently hope the food is lousy, the winter is cold, and the Internet access is awful. But I worry less about what happens to this one man and more about the damage Snowden has done - and could still do - to America's long-term ability to strike the right balance between privacy and security.

Ever since Snowden, a former contractor for the National Security Agency, leaked top-secret material about its surveillance programs, he and the U.S. government have locked horns about the nature of those programs.

But those following the Snowden saga should understand two key points.

First, though many things need to be kept secret in today's dangerous world, the line between "secret" and "not secret" is fuzzy rather than stark, and if the goal is security, the harsh truth is that we should often err toward more secrets rather than fewer.

Second, despite the grumbling from Snowden and his admirers, the U.S. government truly does make strenuous efforts not to violate privacy, not just because it respects privacy (which it does), but because it simply doesn't have the time to read irrelevant emails or listen in on conversations unconnected to possible plots against American civilians.

Incidents like the Snowden affair put my former colleagues in the intelligence community in an impossible position. [Read more: Lipman/LATimes/15August2013]

At NSA, Diversity, Lawfulness are Core Values: Column. As debate swirls around the legitimacy of National Security Agency's surveillance programs, some may wonder whether certain minorities, especially Muslim Americans, are racially profiled or targeted by the NSA. The flip side of that is a suspicion that a place like NSA would never truly welcome Muslim employees.

As an intelligence analyst and former chair of the agency's Islamic Cultural Employee Resource Group, I think it's time to shed more light than heat on several of these issues. NSA constantly fights a negative image, fueled in part by Hollywood and those who aim to deliberately mislead the public ‚?? creating a sinister impression of NSA's lawful activities to protect the nation.

What I know for sure is that NSA's focused compliance regime attracts many minorities to the mission, which is centered on defending the country against foreign adversaries, saving lives, protecting vital networks, and giving both policymakers and war fighters critical information in time to make a real difference.

The agency recruits and hires exceptional individuals from diverse backgrounds and areas of expertise. It then develops and mentors them in the skills necessary to meet today's national security challenges. But an understanding of NSA is incomplete without the recognition of how the agency protects privacy rights as an integral part of its day-to-day activities ‚?? from the commitment of its people to the procedures, laws, and rules that govern its operations.

NSA does not set its own agenda. [Read more: Rizvi/USAToday/15August2013]

No More Spies. If you're an instructor in cover - how to pass as someone you aren't - at the CIA training facility near Williamsburg, Va., what the hell do you tell your students about life in the field?

Edward Snowden's exploitation of the NSA's surprisingly penetrable firewalls, Bradley Manning's large-scale collection of State Department cables, and the inability of the U.S. government to contain secrets are of course features of the open-source revolution that is changing how citizens interact with their government. We can hold our government more accountable. And that's good.

A caveat in honor of Evgeny Morozov goes here: That interaction may not be for the better, of course; the flip side is the ease with which political dissidents can be tracked, imprisoned, and killed. In other countries, the "open" society is nothing of the sort.

Since I'm an intelligence community junkie, I want to mention two examples of how the same principle, the same technological reality, can become a powerful weapon of governments and be a significant detriment to the core mission of their intelligence services. [Read more: Ambinder/TheWeek/15August2013]

IV - Jobs
 [IMPORTANT: AFIO does not "vet" or endorse these research inquiries or job offers. Reasonable-sounding inquiries and career offerings are published as a service to our members, and for researchers, educators, and subscribers. You are urged to exercise your usual caution and good judgment when responding or supplying any information.]

Three Online Academic Adjunct Faculty Positions: Intelligence Studies; National Security Studies; and Military Studies - American Public University/American Military University

American Public University System openings for Online Adjunct Faculty

Intelligence Studies - Required Areas of Expertise and Experience (at least one):
Cyber Intelligence
Counter Terrorism
Opensource Intelligence
Signals Intelligence
Human Intelligence
Intelligence Profiling
Intelligence Analytics
Deception, Propaganda and Disinformation

National Security Studies - Required Experience
Doctoral degree or Juris Doctorate in National Security Studies or a closely related field from a regionally accredited institution is required.
Five or more years of experience in a National Security field is required.
Experience teaching research method courses is preferred.
Experience as a thesis advisor is preferred.
Proficient in Microsoft Office Suite programs required.
Record of excellence in teaching.
College-level teaching experience is required.
Online teaching experience is preferred.

Military Studies - Required Experience
Doctoral degree in Military Studies or a closely related field from a regionally accredited institution is required.
Military Studies subject matter expert required.
Experience as a graduate thesis advisor is preferred.
Experience in a senior military position is preferred.
Experience teaching research method courses is preferred.
College-level teaching experience is preferred.
Online teaching experience is preferred.
Record of excellence in teaching.

Full details on any of the above three positions is available here.


Section V - Coming Educational Events

EDUCATIONAL EVENTS IN COMING TWO MONTHS....

MANY more International Spy Museum Events in 2013 with full details are listed on the AFIO Website at www.afio.com. The titles for some of these are in detail below and online.

Thursday, 22 August 2013, 6:30 pm - Washington, DC - James Bond, All-American Hero: Exquisitely Evil Programs, at the International Spy Museum

Leave your affected British accent at the door!
When Ian Fleming created the character James Bond he made him English to the core, from his Aston Martin to his quick wit and loyalty to the Queen. Historian Jonathan Nashel contends that as Bond has become a global phenomenon something very curious has happened to 007: he has become an all-American hero. Nashel argues that as Bond was idolized by millions of American men during the Cold War, he set the standard for many of them - including President John F. Kennedy. Bond showed how a man should carry himself and especially how he should act when confronted with danger. And English or American, would James Bond have been as fascinating without the evildoers in his films? Nashel will show how the evolving Bond and his responses to these villains and threats influenced the values and mores behind US Cold War policy and affected the image of red, white, and blue Cold War masculinity.
Tickets: $10 Visit www.spymuseum.org to register or more information.

Friday, 23 August 2013, 10:30 am - 2 pm - Tysons Corner, VA - Letitia Long, Director, National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency, and Luke Bencie on Counterespionage for Travelers.

AFIO National Summer Luncheon features Letitia Long, the Director of the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency, and Luke Bencie, author of AMONG ENEMIES: Counter-Espionage for the Business Traveler.

The National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) delivers geospatial intelligence to policymakers, warfighters, intelligence professionals, and first responders. NGA is a unique combination of intelligence agency and combat support agency. Anyone who sails a U.S. ship, flies a U.S. aircraft, makes national policy decisions, fights wars, locates targets, responds to natural disasters, or even navigates with a cellphone relies on NGA. NGA enables all of these through timely, relevant, accurate and actionable GEOINT. NGA manages a global consortium of more than 400 commercial and government relationships. Director Long serves as the functional manager for GEOINT, the head of the National System for Geospatial Intelligence (NSG), and the coordinator of the global Allied System for Geospatial Intelligence (ASG). In these multiple roles, NGA receives guidance and oversight from DOD, the Director of National Intelligence (DNI), and Congress. Headquartered in Springfield, Virginia, NGA has two major locations in St. Louis and Arnold, Mo. Hundreds of NGA employees serve on support teams at U.S. military, diplomatic, and allied locations around the world.

Check-in for badge pickup at 10:30 a.m. Luke Bencie begins his presentation at 11 a.m. Lunch served at noon, NGA Director Long begins her presentation at 1 pm. Morning and Afternoon programs are On The Record The latest intelligence books, and many others, for sale throughout event. Event closes at 2 p.m.
EVENT LOCATION: The Crowne Plaza, 1960 Chain Bridge Road, McLean, Virginia 22102; Driving directions here or use this link: http://tinyurl.com/boey9vf
Register HERE

Wednesdays, 04 September - 25 September 2013, 10:15 a.m. - 11:45 a.m. - Washington, DC - James Bond: Fact Into Fiction (and Back) 4-Session Daytime Course, at the International Spy Museum.

No one has introduced more people to the secret realm of espionage than James Bond. The man we know as 007 has been the face of clandestine operations for more than half a century, giving readers and movie audiences glimpses of a hidden world few are able to imagine.
Bond and his onscreen exploits represent fiction informed by some truth - some of it drawn from author Ian Fleming's own experiences in covert operations as a WWII British naval intelligence officer. In books and onscreen, the ablest agent of British secret intelligence service MI6 faces threats - from Cold War cliffhangers in the Caribbean to mass-media manipulation in the 1990s - that seemed fantastic at the time, but occasionally foreshadowed future headlines.
In Bond's flamboyant adventures, he deploys techniques and technologies that genuine spies use - or perhaps will, should fact catch up with cinematic imagination. His onscreen gadgets are said to have inspired innovations in disguise and communications technologies by real intelligence agency technical services units.

In this series, experts and former intelligence officers explore the intersecting powers of James Bond in fiction and fact, presented in conjunction with the International Spy Museum's continuing exhibition Exquisitely Evil: 50 Years of Bond Villains. They place Bond and his nemeses in historical context, exploring how the evildoers and their plots have changed to reflect their times. (The series price includes a ticket to tour Exquisitely Evil.)

Sept. 4 - Bond Begins: A Cold War Spy
When Ian Fleming created James Bond in 1953, he drew on his own espionage career with British naval intelligence during WW II. Explore the roots of Fleming and Bond with Alexis Albion, PhD, an intelligence historian who served as a guest co-curator of Exquisitely Evil and is a former 9/11 Commission staff member. Learn how the Bond of Fleming's novels evolved to become the superspy universally known for impeccable taste, wit, and physical prowess. Dr. Albion is joined by Burton Gerber, a former CIA Clandestine Service officer and station chief in critical Cold War hotspots, who uncovers the realities of operating behind the Iron Curtain.

Sept. 11 - Bond After the Fall
Bond's fictional world changed after the fall of Communism - just as the collapse of the Soviet Union brought the Western intelligence community a range of challenges, from the absence of a major adversary to slashed funding. Hear from the Museum's Executive Director Peter Earnest, a former CIA Clandestine Service officer, on the transition from the Cold War to the post-Soviet era, and how Bond's adventures mirror the real-world issues and villains of the late-20th century. Jack Platt, another former Clandestine Service officer, provides firsthand observations of the fall of the Soviet Union, the decline of the Russian economy and way of life, and the growth of syndicated crime and corruption in that country.

Sept. 18 - 21st-Century Bond
The museum's historian and Exquisitely Evil co-curator Mark Stout, PhD, a former CIA intelligence analyst, brings you up to speed on the latest Bond villains and their connections to reality. How does Skyfall's Raoul Silva reflect Julian Assange of Wikileaks? How has radicalism and terrorism altered both Bond plotlines and our approach to intelligence? Cindy Storer, a former CIA officer in the Counterterrorism Center, adds perspective on how the intelligence business has changed in response to terrorism.

Sept. 25 - Bond's Women: More Than Meets the Eye
The museum's Adult Programs Director Amanda Ohlke explores the role of women in Bond's universe, from beautiful-but-deadly villains like Elektra King to Judi Dench's steely take on spy boss M. Former CIA officer Melissa Mahle discusses what it was like to undertake an espionage career in the shadow of the femme fatale. Did the Bond girl mystique help or hinder her career? She shares how she took control of the stereotypes and turned them upside down.

Tickets: $120. Obtain yours now via phone: 202.633.3030; or online at www.SmithsonianAssociates.org. Internet Quick Tix code for the program: 1M2-675.
Includes admission to Exquisitely Evil: 50 Years of Bond Villains commemorating the 50th anniversary of the Bond films. See over 100 film artifacts from the archives of EON Productions, the Bond film producers.

Tuesday, 10 September 2013, noon - Washington, DC - "Cyber War Will Not take Place," at the International Spy Museum with author Thomas Rid.

Is cyber war really coming? Scholar Thomas Rid of the Department of War Studies at Kings College London argues that the focus on war distracts from the real challenge of cyberspace: non-violent confrontation that may rival or even replace violence in surprising ways. In this provocative talk, the author will trace the most significant hacks and attacks and explore some key questions: What are cyber weapons? How have they changed the meaning of violence? How likely and how dangerous is crowd-sourced subversive activity? Why has there never been a lethal cyber-attack against a country's critical infrastructure? How serious is the threat of cyber-espionage? And who is most vulnerable in the cyber realm?
Join this British author for an informal chat and book signing. Tickets: Free! No registration required. For more information visit www.spymuseum.org

Wednesday, 11 September 2013, 11:30 - 1:30 - Scottsdale, AZ - AFIO Arizona Chapter features LTG Zahner on Future Instability & Threat Analysis - Solving a "Big Data" Problem

Guest Speaker: Lieutenant General (ret.) RICHARD P. ZAHNER speaks on Future Instability & Threat Analysis - Solving a "Big Data" Problem.
Synopsis: The Intelligence Community has just achieved an Initial Operating Capability for its next-generation analytic platform, one that leverages "CLOUD" technology to support the entire National Intelligence Program Information Technology needs.
While GOOGLE, AMAZON, APPLE and a host of other recently created US technology giants have shown the power of "CLOUD" in commerce:
Does CLOUD hold the same promise for the intelligence discipline? Does vastly greater volumes of data, derived from an extensive range of sources and delivered within seconds solve the problems of intelligence prediction that have bedeviled the IC and policy leadership? What does the impact of a post-WikiLeaks/Snowden environment have on creation and retention of "ig Data" across the IC? Is CLOUD central to the future of intelligence or momentary fad or distraction? The talk will NOT delve into the complexities of CLOUD computing, but will assess the impacts of this IT revolution on existing and emergent analytic frameworks and national strategy and decision-making.
L ocation: McCormick Ranch Golf Course, 7505 McCormick Parkway, Scottsdale AZ 85258 ~ Phone 480.948.0260
RSVP September 9, 2011 (no later please)
As always, for reservations or questions, please email Simone: simone@afioaz.org or simone@4smartphone.net. To call, please leave a message on 602.570.6016. If you are going to bring a guest, please send me their full names and with a note if they are paying or you, the member will be paying.

Wednesday, 11 September 2013, 6 p.m. - Las Vegas, NV - The AFIO Las Vegas Chapter hears Col James Harvey, USAF on "Silent Shield"

Our featured speaker for the evening will be: COL James P. Harvey, USAF
Topic: SILENT SHIELD: AFSOC's Direct Support Operators. As a result of a hostile fire incident during Operation JUST CAUSE, AFSOC and AIA established a program called SILENT SHIELD. This program uses a special group of airborne cryptologic linguists (called Direct Support Operators) to provide a direct threat warning "shield" around special operations aircraft. Over the decades, the SILENT SHIELD mission has grown into a joint, special operations capability featuring airborne cryptologic linguists and their language skills as a weapon and extending the shield around ground and maritime special operations forces. During operations ENDURING and IRAQI FREEDOM, these intelligence professionals even became a "go no-go" criteria for many critical special operations ground missions.
In November 1991, Knife 01 crashed in Afghanistan with one of these special operations intelligence professionals on board. The DSO's actions in the air and on the ground saved the lives of the crew and several Afghan civilians.
Presenter: Col J.P. Harvey is an AFSOC plank-holder, was an MH-60G pilot from 1987-1991, and commanded the 25th Intelligence Squadron (SILENT SHIELD) from 2006-2008.
Colonel James P. Harvey is the Air Force Intelligence Surveillance and Reconnaissance Agency's representative to the Commander, USAF Warfare Center, Nellis AFB, Nevada, and serves as the Center's Director of Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance. The USAFWC is responsible for assuring combat air, space, and information operations forces are trained and equipped to conduct integrated combat operations. As the A2, Colonel Harvey integrates ISR across the Center's air, space and cyberspace advanced testing, tactics development and training efforts.
Colonel Harvey was commissioned in May 1986 and following Undergraduate Helicopter Training, he served as a pilot in the 55th Special Operations Squadron. Following this assignment, he instructed at the Air Force Academy as a Course Director and Assistant Professor. Colonel Harvey then attended the Intelligence Officers Course, completed as the Honor Graduate, and has held numerous joint, interagency and Air Force positions leading to his current post.
at Nellis Air Force Base Officers' Club
(Guest names must be submitted along with their birth date to me by 4:00 p.m., Monday, August 19, 2013
Please join us at 5 p.m. in the "Robin's Roost" bar area for liaison and beverages.

Place: The Officers' Club at Nellis Air Force Base. All guests must use the MAIN GATE, located at the intersection of Craig Road and Las Vegas Blvd. Address: 5871 Fitzgerald Blvd., Nellis AFB, NV 89191 Phone: 702-644-2582.

Nellis Air Force Base Access:
If you have provided your name, date of birth and either a drivers' license number or a social security number, your name will be at the guarded main gate at the entrance of Nellis Air Force Base. If not, please provide this information to me by Monday August 19, 2013, or you will not be admitted on base. If you currently have adequate base access, you do not need to provide this information.

RSVP to Mary Bentley (mary.bentley@doe.gov) or call her at 702-295-0417, if you have any questions. We look forward to seeing you!

Wednesday, 11 September 2013, noon - Washington, DC - "Global Terrorism, Espionage and Cybersecurity" (a Monthly Update), at the International Spy Museum featuring David Major.

Presented in partnership with the CI Centre, these monthly briefings will provide you with the opportunity to be the first to learn of the most current worldwide happenings in the field of intelligence and terrorism. Drawn from the Centre's SPYPEDIAģ, a comprehensive online subscription database of espionage information, each of these updates covers important events and information which may not be reported by mainstream media outlets. Such as: espionage penetrations and arrests, cyber espionage reporting, and terrorist events. Briefings led by CI Centre founder David Major will include trend analysis and coverage of new emerging issues of value to the intelligence and security professional and individuals with an interest in national security matters. Major will also highlight and review, as appropriate, new books and reports to keep you current with breaking developments in the national security arena.
Tickets: Free! No registration required. For more information visit www.spymuseum.org

Wednesday, 11 September 2013, 7 pm - 10 pm - Washington, DC - "Dinner with a Spy," An Evening with Malcolm Nance.

He's been undercover in terrorist hotspots, passed hostile border crossings in disguise, submitted to waterboarding, and now he's prepared to dine with you. Malcolm W. Nance is a counterterrorism and terrorism intelligence expert with wide-ranging field and combat experience. A frequent guest commentator on breaking news, he's the author of The Terrorist Recognition Handbook among other books. Drawing on his experience as a 20-year veteran of the US intelligence community's Combating Terrorist program, he's been a consultant for the US government on special operations, homeland security, and intelligence. As a master Survival, Evasion, Resistance and Escape (SERE) instructor, he can handle any tricky situation including testifying before the US Congress. You will be one of only 20 guests at Poste for a three-course dinner where you'll talk with him about his extraordinary experiences and thoughts on today's intelligence issues.
Tickets: $225. Please call 202.654.0932 or email lhicken@spymuseum.org to register and provide any special dietary needs.
Ticket includes hors d'oeuvres and three-course dinner with wines. Registration required, space is limited! For more information visit www.spymuseum.org.
Location: Poste, 555 8th St NE, Washington, DC 20002

Monday, 16 September 2013, 5:30 - 8 pm - New York, NY - "Putin's Russia" featuring KGB Maj Gen Oleg D. Kalugin, addressing AFIO NY Metro Chapter

Gen. Kalugin was one of the youngest generals in the history of the KGB, and his intelligence career spanned the better part of the Cold War. As deputy resident at the Soviet embassy in Washington, DC, he oversaw Moscow's spy network in the United States, and as head of KGB foreign counter-intelligence, he directed several Soviet covert actions against the West. In his memoirs, Spymaster, KGB Major General Oleg Kalugin (Ret.) provided an unparalleled look at the inner workings of Moscow's famed spy agency. Join Kalugin to hear firsthand of his assessment of how Russia and its intelligence organs have fared under Russian president Vladimir Putin, including the death of Russian intelligence defector Alexander Litvinenko in London in 2006, up to the present quandary dealing with the Edward Snowden leaker affair.
Location:  Society of Illustrators Building  128 East 63rd Street (between Park Ave and Lexington Avenue). 
Times:  Registration starts at 5:30 PM with 6 PM meeting start. 
Fee: $50/pp - advanced registration required at afiometro@gmail.com or call 646-717-3776.

Thursday, 19 September 2013, 11:30 am - Colorado Springs, CO - The Rocky Mountain Chapter presents Mark Pfoff, Detective El Paso County Sheriff's Office

The Rocky Mountain Chapter presents Mark Pfoff, Detective, El Paso County Sheriff's Office will talk on a case he has been working since 2006 regarding an Online Predator that is finally coming to a close. This event will take place on 19 Sep 2013 at 11:30am. To be held at The Inn at Palmer Divide, 443 S. Highway 105 Palmer Lake, CO, Exit 161 westbound off I-25, West on Highway 105. Please RSVP to Tom VanWormer at robsmom@pcisys.net

Saturday, 21 September 2013 - Kennebunk, ME - The AFIO Maine Chapter hears Robert Wallace on "Who's Really Spying On You?"

The chapter opens its fall programs with Robert W. Wallace addressing "WHO IS REALLY SPYING ON YOU?" Is individual freedom being undermined by a government constituted to preserve liberty? The speaker describes the post WWII development of surveillance tools and communications technology and the implications of the “big data” phenomena for intelligence capabilities, national policy, and individual behavior.
Bob Wallace’s 32-year career with CIA (1971-2003) included assignments as operations officer, station chief, resource manager, and director of clandestine technical programs. Between 1991 and 2003 he held senior positions including Director of CIA’s Office of Technical Services (OTS). After his retirement in 2004 he founded ArtemusConsulting Group, a network of intelligence professionals which offers management counsel and strategic planning.
He is author of SPYCRAFT: the Secret History of the CIA’s Spytechs from Communism to al-Qaeda, contributor to Vaults, Mirrors & Masks: Rediscovering U.S. Counterintelligence and co-author of The Official CIA Manual of Deception and Trickery. His presentations include such diverse groups as The Smithsonian, National Archives, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the International Spy Museum and, of course, AFIO/ME.
Because of the increasing interest in and attendance at our meetings, beginning September 21 our meetings will be held at the Kennebunk High School main auditorium located at 89 Fletcher Street (Route 35), Kennebunk. The building is 1 ½ miles north from US Route 1 (Junction of Rte 35 & 1) and ½ mile south from Maine Turnpike Exit 25. The auditorium is at the south end of the building through the door marked #3. Park along Fletcher St in front of the building or behind the south side of the building. The meeting is open to the public. For information call 207-967-4298.

Thursday, 26 September 2013, 6:30 pm - Washington, DC - "Enemies Within: Inside the NYPD's Secret Spying Unit and bin Laden's Final Plot Against America," at the International Spy Museum

Six months after the 9/11 attacks, New York Police Commissioner Ray Kelly initiated a straightforward, yet audacious, antiterrorist plan to be implemented in the Big Apple, dispatching a vast network of undercover officers and informants to track suspected terrorists. In Enemies Within, Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative journalists Matt Apuzzo and Adam Goldman for Associated Press reveal the effectiveness of the domestic spying plan. Based on hundreds of previously unpublished New York Police Department internal memos and exclusive interviews with intelligence sources, including 25-year FBI veteran Don Borelli who assisted with the book, they found that many of those strategies aren't even close to being useful, functional, or successful. As Assistant Special Agent in Charge in the New York Joint Terrorism Task Force (JTTF), Borelli was responsible for top investigations and counterterrorism missions that spanned the globe. Join Apuzzo and Borelli for an unbridled look at the breathtaking race to avert a second devastating terrorist attack on American soil.
Join the co-author and contributor for an informal chat and book signing.
Tickets: Free! No registration required. For more information visit www.spymuseum.org.

Tuesday, 01 October 2013, 6 pm - Washington, DC - "Witness to History: The Investigation of Robert Hanssen," at the International Spy Museum

International Spy Museum events In 1979, FBI special agent Robert Hanssen volunteered to spy for Soviet Military Intelligence (GRU). To enrich his lifestyle and that of his family, the counterintelligence expert shared US intelligence community secrets, the identities of dozens of secret intelligence agents working for the US around the world, caused deaths of Russians aiding the US, and leaked the existence of an FBI eavesdropping tunnel under the Russian Embassy in DC. Hanssen remained anonymous to his Soviet handlers and to the US government for over 20 years. Building the case against Hanssen was a joint effort between the FBI, CIA, Department of State, and the Justice Department. Hanssen's arrest and conviction led to a full security review of the FBI. Panelists for this inside look at the case include: Mike Rochford, (ret.) FBI Section Chief, Russian Overseas Espionage and David Wise, Author of Spy: The Inside Story of How the FBI's Robert Hanssen Betrayed America
Light hors d'oeuvres at 6:00PM. Panel begins at 6:45pm. Free! Registration required, space is limited! For more information visit www.spymuseum.org.

10 - 11 October 2013 - Charleston, SC - The Citadel - The Military College of South Carolina presents the Southeast Region Security & Intelligence Conference with the theme: "Securing Our Intelligence & Protecting Our Ports" 

Keeping with the tradition of The Citadel's historic role in defending the country, the Criminal Justice Department and the School of Humanities is pleased to announce the next chapter in Homeland Security. The Citadel will hold its first conference dedicated to Homeland Security and Intelligence. The conference will feature professionals and academics from various disciplines and agencies related to homeland security and intelligence. Keynote speakers include: Letitia Long, Director of the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency; Robert Cardillo, Deputy Director for Intelligence Integration, Office of the Director of National Intelligence; Stu Shea, Chief Operating Officer, SAIC, and many other senior officials and experts. http://www.citadel.edu/root/criminaljustice-sersi-conference
Conference Registration: https://foundation.citadel.edu/sersi

16 October 2013 - Laurel, Maryland - "Safeguarding Intelligence" - Theme of the National Cryptological Museum Foundation's Annual Membership Meeting

Details on the speakers, agenda and other events will be provided as soon as they become available.

The Meeting will be held at the Kossiakoff Center, JHU/APL, 11100 John Hopkins Rd, Laurel, MD 20723, 240-228-7574

The fee for NCMF members is $20 and for non members $50 which includes one year membership in the NCMF.  The fee includes breakfast, lunch and refreshments at the morning break.  There will also be A.M and P.M. shuttle service to and from the parking lot.

You can register securely online here on the donation page, or you can download and complete the Registration form and mail to the NCMF at PO Box 1682, Ft. George G. Meade, MD 20755.  Call 301-688-5436 for assistance or send an email to cryptmf@aol.com

17-18 October 2013 - Laurel, MD - "Technological Change and Cryptology: Meeting the Historical Challenges" is theme at the Biennial Cryptologic History Symposium

The Two Day Cryptographic History Event of the Year - "Technological Change and Cryptology: Meeting the Historical Challenges" - NSA's 2013 Cryptologic History Symposium, 17-18 October 2013 Laurel, Maryland

The Center for Cryptologic History hosts a biennial international symposium in October during odd-numbered years. The speakers and audience are a mix of outside scholars, current practitioners, retired veterans, and interested members of the public. Past symposia have had presenters from over a dozen countries.
The theme for the 2013 symposium, to be held on October 17-18 at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory's Kossiakoff Conference Center (just west of Laurel, Maryland) is "Technological Change and Cryptology: Meeting the Historical Challenges." The conference will include sessions on "A Tribute to Alan Turing," a "Roundtable on Cyber History," "Bletchley Park," "COMINT and the Civil War," "The Cryptologic Legacy of the Great War Era," "SIGINT and the Vietnam War Era," and "A Technological Advantage: Historical Perspectives on Cryptologic Research and Development."
In all there will be 21 separate sessions and over 70 presentations. Speakers will include scholars such as David Kahn and cryptologic pioneers such as Whitfield Diffie.
All symposium sessions are unclassified and open to the registered public. A complete agenda and registration information will be available here at the website or by contacting the Center for Cryptologic History at 301-688-2336 or via email at history@nsa.gov.

Note also that the National Cryptologic Museum Foundation has an excellent program the day before - 16 October - at the same venue described above.

2 November 2013 - Indialantic, FL - AFIO Florida Satellite Chapter Hears from FBI Sr Resident Agent Russell Hayes

The AFIO Florida Satellite Chapter will host Russell Hayes, Supervisory Senior Resident Agent, Brevard Resident Agency, Federal Bureau of Investigation, a sub-office of the FBI Tampa Division. Mr. Hayes also heads the Brevard (County) Joint Terrorism Task Force and will address a variety of topical issues. The meeting will take place at the Eau Gallie Yacht Club, Indialantic, FL, and the Meet and Greet will begin at 1130. For information and reservations, please contact Bobbie Keith, 321.777.5561 or bobbie6769@juno.com.

For Additional Events two+ months or greater....view our online Calendar of Events


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